Archive for the ‘Milo Yiannopoulos’ Category

Milo Yiannopoulos ’10 Things I Hate About Mexico’ speech …

Conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos has had another campus speech cancelled, only this time it was college Republicans who pulled the plug.

The UCLA Bruin Republicans nixed the event Wednesday, just one day after announcing that Mr. Yiannopoulos would appear Feb. 26 to deliver a speech entitled, 10 Things I Hate About Mexico.

The invitation ignited an outcry, including an open letter from UCLA associate professor Gabriel Rossman, who has supported the Bruin Republicans but said he would disassociate himself from the student group if it went ahead with the event.

The campus organization said it decided to disinvite Mr. Yiannopoulos over dissension within its ranks.

The decision to host Milo has polarized the leadership of the organization between those wishing to move forward with the event and those who wish to cancel it, said the Bruin Republicans in a Wednesday post on Facebook.

The club recently hosted climate skeptic Alex Epstein, author of The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels, while conservative author Dinesh DSouza spoke in January at an event hosted by the UCLA Freedom Coalition.

In order for an organization to be able to function properly, it must do so with the unequivocal support of all its members, said the clubs notice. This does not mean that we all must agree 100% on all issues but we must have at least a clear majority. Consequently, we have decided not to move forward with the event.

Mr. Yiannopoulos was disappointed by the cancellation. I despair at the trajectory of Californian universities. Even the students who describe themselves as Republicans seem hopelessly lost and weak, he said on Facebook.

He also vowed to continue arranging speeches in California. His February 2017 talk at the University of California Berkeley was abruptly cancelled after leftist protesters rioted, setting fires and causing $100,000 in damage to the campus.

Unlike previous generations of conservative and libertarian activists I refuse to simply hand over the keys to the wacko left, Mr. Yiannopoulos said. In the meantime I urge parents to reconsider sending your kids to these schools. Theyre not getting educated theyre getting indoctrinated.

Chancellor Gene Block praised the decision to rescind the invitation. I hope we will all continue to resist such provocations and nurture our campus culture, which values ideas over hatred, he said in a campus email, as reported by the Daily Bruin.

Mr. Rossman was also pleased. That the university respects free speech rights and that it was the clubs decision to make, is just as important as the outcome, he said in a post on the Weekly Standard.

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Milo Yiannopoulos ’10 Things I Hate About Mexico’ speech …

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February 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’ UCLA talk on what he hates about Mexico …

“The title of the talk referenced what the speaker ‘hated’ about Mexico a country with deep ties to our city, our state and our nation. This is also a country that is an important part of the heritage of many Bruins,” he said. “The expression of disdain did not appear to be an attempt to engage in reasoned discussion, but rather a move by the speaker to gain notoriety through a mean-spirited, racially tinged publicity stunt.”

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos to Visit UCLA This Month for Talk, 10 …

Milo Yiannopoulos, the right-wing rabble-rouser whose campus appearances have sparked widespread protests, is headed to UCLA this month this time to talk about what he hates about Mexico.

Conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos is headed to UCLA this month to talk about what he hates about Mexico. (Credit: Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

Yiannopolos said he intends to take on Mexican patriarchy in his Feb. 26 talk, 10 Things I Hate About Mexico, which is being hosted by the Bruin Republicans. He said the talk is timely now as Congress moves to tackle immigration reform.

[President] Trump and the Republicans make an economic and law-and-order case against uncontrolled immigration from Mexico. Im going to make the social justice case against importing any more of this particular culture into America, Yiannopoulos said in a text Wednesday. In other words, what would a third wave intersectional feminist, if she was being honest, say about Mexican society and culture, and in particular the rampant misogyny, corruption and patriarchal oppression that runs rampant throughout its ruling classes?

To put it another way: What would runaway immigration from Mexico mean for women, people of color, queer people and trans folk?

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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Milo Yiannopoulos to Visit UCLA This Month for Talk, 10 …

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Open Letter to the Bruin Republicans who invited Milo …

Editors note: On February 13, UCLAs college Republican group, the Bruin Republicans, announced that they would be hosting Milo Yiannopoulos on campus to give a talk titled “10 Things I Hate About Mexico.” Gabriel Rossman is a professor of sociology at UCLA who recently became a friend and informal advisor to the Bruin Republicans. This is his response to the Yiannopoulos invitation.

An open letter to the Bruin Republicans,

I was very glad to meet everyone at a recent lunch. You seem to be a great group of students with serious aspirations and a strong interest in conservatism. As you will recall, in my remarks I expressed the hope that you would follow the traditional debating society model of the Harvard Republicans rather than the epater les SJWs performance art model of the University of Colorado Republicans as described in Binder and Woods Becoming Right. You will also recall a very specific corollary I mentioned: Do not invite Milo Yiannopoulos. It was for this reason that I was surprised when I learned Tuesday that you were doing exactly that, and for a talk entitled 10 Things I Hate About Mexico.

One thing I left out of my remarks about the impact of the ideological skew of academia is that the dearth of conservative faculty means a lack of mentorship for conservative students. Which is part of the reason you see students at places such as University of Colorado engaging in ill-conceived political theater that can be amusing and provocativebut is ultimately counter-productive.

As one of the few conservative faculty at UCLA, and one of a very few who knows the campus club, I feel obligated to provide some mentorship here: I strongly urge you to rescind your invitation to Yiannopoulos. Allow me to explain why.

The most important reason not to host such a talk is that it is evil on the merits. Your conscience should tell you that you never want anything to do with someone whose entire career is not reasoned argument, but shock jock performance art. In the 1980s conservatives made fun of artists who defecated on stage for the purpose of upsetting conservatives. Now apparently, conservatives are willing to embrace a man who says despicable things for the purpose of triggering snowflakes. The change in performance art from the fecal era to the present is yet another sign that no matter how low civilization goes, there is still room for further decline.

I want to be clear that my point here is not that some people will be offended, but that the speaker is purely malicious.

Many speakers and many speeches will offend people, especially given the sense among many on the campus left that they are entitled to complete isolation from ideas with which they disagree.

This is different.

Looking at the fall quarter calendar, I see Richard Sander, Rafael Dagnesses, Keith Fink, and Ben Shapiro recently gave talks sponsored by your group. Lots of people disagree with these speakers, and I disagree with some of them about certain points, but none of them are malicious.

I can understand why some people were offended by Heather Mac Donalds ideas when she spoke on campus last year. But reasonable people can disagree about whether all Americans, and especially African Americans, on net benefit from aggressive policing. More to the point, Mac Donald expresses her pro-police position without animus, so sponsoring her talk was an entirely legitimate and honorable thing to do.

If the Bruin Republicans were considering a talk with a journalist or scholar giving a temperate and reasoned lecture on ten reasons why Mexicos social development lags, then it could be a very reasonable event to host, even if people were offended by it.

I would also caution you to expect that speakers who take ideas seriously are often repelled by association with deliberately offensive speakers. For instance, when the organizers of Free Speech Week at Berkeley circulated a list of (proposed) speakers, Charles Murray told the Chronicle of Higher Education that he would never under any circumstances appear at an event that included Milo Yiannopoulos. Obviously, Murray is someone whose ideas many people find offensive, but he expresses them without hatred and so declines to appear with someone he (correctly) considers a despicable asshole. Likewise, I know many conservative writers, but I imagine an invitation would be much less attractive to them (nor would I extend it) if they had to bring Lysol to clean the podium from the prior occupant.

There are other reasons not to associate yourselves with Yiannopoulos. Whether or not anyone notices, you want to be on the side of the person getting attacked for being a Jew (such as Ben Shapiro, who you have hosted before), not the person who mocks that Jew by dressing midgets in kippahs (and on a separate occasion debases America the Beautiful by singing it to an audience of giggling Nazis as they throw sieg heils).

The merits are more important than appearances, of course, but the fact is that people will notice if the Bruin Republicans host someone offering nothing more than alt-right camp and this is a secondary reason not to do so.

You need to ask yourselves, what is your goal as an organization? If youre in it for the lulz and just want to see the world burn, then I guess go ahead and bring in a vapid provocateur.

But if your mission is to spread conservative ideas, you should recognize that hosting Yiannopoulos will only render your organization and our ideas toxic. The left often suspects that principled conservative positions are actually born of racism. Conservatives have traditionally pushed back against this criticism. Here at UCLA, that will be a much less tenable argument for Bruin Republicans to make if they host a talk by someone whose sole recommendation is that his offensiveness to others is his big idea.

My understanding of the proposed Yiannopoulos event is that it is intended in part to be a fundraiser. Remember the question Jesus asks in the synoptic gospels, For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? In the case of the Bruin Republicans, the question is not poignant but pathetic: What does it profit a club to cover the costs of an eventand maybe get enough to cover an end-of-year partyif they lose their integrity and reputation.

I am a strong believer in freedom of political speech. However, there is a distinction between tolerating speech and sponsoring speech. Neither I, nor you, nor Chancellor Block have the right to say that Milo Yiannopoulos cannot give a speech on campus.

But neither does that mean that I, or you, or Chancellor Block needs to actively invite him and actively promote his childish provocations. If he wants to stand on Bruin Walk ranting with the other creeps and lunatics, he can do so. I believe people have the right to do all sorts of things in the privacy of their own homes, but that doesnt mean that I would invite them to do them in my living room for an audience of me and my dinner guests.

If you go through with hosting Yiannopoulos, I will vociferously support your right to do soand the duty of the UCPD to use force if necessary to maintain order and prevent a hecklers veto. However, I must just as vehemently and publicly disagree with your decision to host him.

Specifically, should the event go forward, I will decline to have any association with the Bruin Republicans until it has experienced a complete turnover in membership. I hope that will not be the case and that I can continue to support you.

Sincerely,Gabriel Rossman

Gabriel Rossman is an associate professor of sociology at UCLA.

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Ann Coulter Shrugs Off ‘Law & Order: SVU’ Episode: ‘Why Don’t They Follow My Approach and Not Care?’


Thursday on Fox News Channel’s “The Ingraham Angle,” conservative commentator Ann Coulter reacted to an episode of NBC’s “Law & Order: SVU” from a night earlier that depicted the rape of a fictional conservative pundit that resembled her. Coulter referenced the Twitter banning of Milo Yiannopoulos allegedly for criticisms of “Saturday Night Live” cast member Leslie Jones and recommended celebrities follow her example and “not care.” She also called those involved with the creation of “Law & Order: SVU” hypocrites for their depiction of conservatives on immigration. “Why don’t they follow my approach and not care?” Coulter said. “But I do think it’s worth bringing up at this point also what just raging frauds and hypocrites they are. One of the things I read, I mean I read it in a Newsbusters write-up, wants to deport DREAMers. OK, Laura, I promise you the writers, the actors and the producers of this TV show — they will move heaven and earth to make sure their kids don’t go to school any place near a DREAMer. Their only contact with illegal aliens is the woman who cleans their toilet whose name they don’t know. Oh, but they’re going to stand up for the illegal aliens. So

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Ann Coulter Shrugs Off ‘Law & Order: SVU’ Episode: ‘Why Don’t They Follow My Approach and Not Care?’

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February 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Antifa vs. Milo Yiannopoulos: Who won? – Salon.com

This dramatic decline in his public appearances over the past year is directly correlated with the precedent set in February 2017 at Berkeley. Love it or hate it, images of targeted property destruction in northern California provided a powerful incentive for venues to avoid potential headaches.

Reasonable people will disagree about the influence of the Berkeley protest on Yiannopoulos plummet. What is not debatable, however, is that media predictions about the inevitable ascent of Milo Yiannopoulos after getting shut down in Berkeley were wrong. A year later, already banned from Twitter, Yiannopoulos now has no access to media platforms like Breitbart and the Daily Caller, no publisher for his books, no mega-donors to bankroll him and dwindling opportunities for public speaking. In an age of social media and 24-hour cable news cycles, Yiannopoulos is already old news. The short-lived nature of his stardom is even evident on Google Trends which shows that after spiking in early 2017, the frequency of subsequent Google searches for his name have plunged to 2016 levels.

Yet, this discussion misses the most crucial aspect of protests at Berkeley, Rutgers, DePaul, UCLA and other campuses. Pundits asked how protests would affect Milo Yiannopoulos public profile. They failed to ask more important questions: How do Yiannopoulos events and the rhetoric he spews endanger those he targets, and how can they fight back? How these protests affect Yiannopoulos (or otherfar-right figures like Richard Spencer or Ann Coulter) is interesting; how they affect resistance to the far right is essential. Lost in such debates is the astoundingmobilization over recent years of a broad anti-racist movement encompassing Black Lives Matter groups, labor unions, faith communities, immigrants rights coalitions, anti-fascist networks, feminist collectives and LGBTQ organizations that will not just ignore attempts to make white supremacy great again. We must situate the property destruction at Berkeley, heckling at UMASS Amherst, the air horns at Minnesota, the blockade at UC Davis, and other acts of disruption within this process of movement-building to understand their full effect.

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Antifa vs. Milo Yiannopoulos: Who won? – Salon.com

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February 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos will represent himself in Simon & Schuster …

(Photo: Getty Images, Lisa Maree Williams)

In the entire U.S. legal system, the biggest power move you can makeother than bringing in bags and bags of letters to Santais to fire your legal counsel and go rogue. It sends a very clear message that youre someone who knows exactly what to do, has no interest in messing around, and will only be held back by professional advice. Unfortunately, its also an indication that you might be dangerously overconfident, and youre willing to let your narcissism torpedo your entire case.

Anyway, Milo Yiannopoulos has reportedly split from his lawyer in his big Simon & Schuster lawsuit, with The Hills Will Sommer reporting that Yiannopoulos and the lawyer had some kind of fundamental disagreement that has made the relationship untenable. Naturally, Yiannopouloswho is suing the publisher for cancelling his book dealwill now be representing himself in the $10 million lawsuit, and whether it ends up working in his favor or not, it should be pretty entertaining to watch. This also comes not long after the editors notes for the book were released, proving that Yiannopoulos editor had just about as much patience for his bullshit as the rest of us.

Theres no word on if hes planning to bring in letters to Santa yet, though.

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Berkeley cancels Milo Yiannopoulos talk after violent …

The university blamed “150 masked agitators” for the unrest, saying they had come to campus to disturb an otherwise peaceful protest.

Two Berkeley College Republicans “were attacked while conducting an interview” on the campus on Thursday, UC Berkeley also said in a prepared statement. The attackers, who were not affiliated with the university, were taken into custody by UC Berkeley police.

Administrators decided to cancel the Wednesday event about two hours before the Breitbart editor’s speech. UC Berkeley said it removed him from campus “amid the violence and destruction of property and out of concern for public safety.”

Black-clad protesters wearing masks threw commercial-grade fireworks and rocks at police. Some even hurled Molotov cocktails that ignited fires. They also smashed windows of the student union center on the Berkeley campus where the Yiannopoulos event was to be held.

At least six people were injured. Some were attacked by the agitators — who are a part of an anarchist group known as the “Black Bloc” that has been causing problems in Oakland for years, said Dan Mogulof, UC Berkeley spokesman.

More than 1,500 protesters had gathered at Sproul Plaza, chanting and holding signs that read: “No safe space for racists” and “This is war.”

As the scene spiraled out of control, university police warned protesters to disperse and issued a lockdown for campus buildings.

“While Yiannopoulos’ views, tactics and rhetoric are profoundly contrary to our own, we are bound by the Constitution, the law, our values and the campus’s Principles of Community to enable free expression across the full spectrum of opinion and perspective,” it stated.

As police dispersed the crowd from campus, a remaining group of protesters moved into downtown Berkeley and smashed windows at several local banks.

No arrests were made throughout the night.

Yiannopoulos on college speaking tour

Yiannopoulos had been invited to speak by the Berkeley College Republicans. He has been on a college speaking tour and had planned to speak about cultural appropriation on Wednesday.

In a Facebook Live video, Yiannopoulos described what happened as “an expression of political violence.”

“I’m just stunned that hundreds of people … were so threatened by the idea that a conservative speaker might be persuasive, interesting, funny and might take some people with him, they have to shut it down at all costs.”

President Donald Trump weighed in on Twitter, suggesting the possibility of cutting federal funds to the public university.

“If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view — NO FEDERAL FUNDS?” Trump tweeted Thursday morning.

Later, Yiannopoulos posted Trump’s tweet to Facebook and proclaimed himself “the catalyst for this change.”

“American universities are on notice. The President is watching,” he wrote. “The days you could silence conservative and libertarian voices on campus and still expect to collect their tax money are coming to an end.”

But some protesters said the Yiannopoulos event wasn’t a matter of free speech, because he espouses hate speech.

UC Berkeley said it had prepared security measures following what had happened at Yiannopoulos’ previous events. One of his planned speaking engagements at UC Davis was also canceled last month in response to protests.

“Ultimately, and unfortunately, however, it was impossible to maintain order given the level of threat, disruption and organized violence,” UC Berkeley said in a statement.

Most UC Berkeley students who spoke with CNN said they were relieved that Yiannopoulos wasn’t able to speak, but this was not how they wanted to accomplish that goal.

One student told CNN that he didn’t agree with what happened.

“It’s a sad irony in the fact that the Free Speech Movement was founded here and tonight, someone’s free speech got shut down. It might have been hateful speech, but it’s still his right to speak,” said Shivam Patel, a freshmen who stood outside of Sproul Plaza.

The Free Speech Movement started at UC Berkeley in 1964 after students protested en masse when administrators tried to restrict their political activities on campus.

Patel said he supported peaceful protests, but disagreed with the way things turned out on Wednesday.

“It allows people on the right to say, ‘Look at all these liberal Berkeley snowflakes. They’re intolerant of speech.’ I don’t think it’s productive at all. It does nothing to help this country.”

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January 12, 2018   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’ book – theguardian.com

Court documents filed in the US have revealed the editorial concerns of the publisher Simon & Schuster about the manuscript of the alt-right controversialist Milo Yiannopouloss autobiography Dangerous.

Having reportedly secured the book for an advance of $255,000 (200,000), Simon & Schuster cancelled the deal in February after a recording emerged that appeared to show Yiannopoulos endorsing sex between younger boys and older men.

In July, Yiannopoulos set out to sue Simon & Schuster for $10m for breach of contract. As part of the case, Simon & Schuster have submitted documents that reveal the problems they had with the book. Among other criticisms, the publishers notes say Yiannopoulos needed a stronger argument against feminism than saying that they are ugly and sexless and have cats and that another chapter needs a better central thesis than the notion that gay people should go back in the closet.

In addition to the documents, a full copy of an early manuscript of the book, complete with the Simon & Schuster editor Mitchell Iverss notes, is available to download from the New York state courts website.

The tone is set in notes on the prologue to the manuscript. Ivers writes to Yiannopoulos: Throughout the book, your best points seem to be lost in a sea of self-aggrandizement and scattershot thinking, and adds: Careful that the egotistical boasting doesnt make you seem juvenile.

Add something like this only less self-serving reads another comment early in the manuscript.

Ivers frequently calls on Yiannopoulos to back up his assertions in the text. In the first nine pages of chapter one, notes include: Citations needed, Do you have proof of this?, Unsupportable charge and Cite examples.

Yiannopoulos was permanently banned from Twitter in 2016 after his role in the online harassment of the Ghostbusters actor Leslie Jones. The editor makes several notes asking the author to tone down racism in the text. Delete irrelevant and superfluous ethnic joke, Ivers writes of a passage about taxi drivers. Lets not call South Africa white is another request, while elsewhere Yiannopoulos is reprimanded for using the phrase dark continent about Africa.

Yiannopoulos, who was filmed singing America the Beautiful while the white nationalist leader Richard Spencer and others gave the Hitler salute in the audience, is also criticised for attempting to suggest that the Hollywood left is more racist than Nazis. I dont like using Nazi analogies. Ever, is the editors note.

Yiannopoulos is repeatedly warned his choice of words is undermining any argument he is attempting to make. The use of phrases like two-faced backstabbing bitches diminishes your overall point, reads one comment. Too important a point to end in a crude quip is another. Unclear, unfunny, delete, reads another.

The early sections of a chapter on feminism prompt the note: Dont start chapter with accusation that feminists = fat. It destroys any seriousness of purpose. Yiannopoulos goes on to criticise contemporary feminism as merely a capitalist con-job a money-grab designed to sell T-shirts to Taylor Swift and Beyonc fans with asinine slogans. Um like your MILO SWAG? the editor responds.

Iverss evident exasperation becomes clear by page 84, where Yiannopouloss call for lesbians to be thrown out of academia altogether simply elicits the all-upper-case comment: DELETE UGH.

On Wednesday, Ivers retweeted without comment Publishing Perspectives Editor-in-Chief Porter Anderson pointing out that Ivers overall review described the book as at best, a superficial work full of incendiary jokes with no coherent or sophisticated analysis of political issues.

However, the emergence of the notes have not allowed Simon & Schuster to escape continued criticism for their initial striking of a deal with Yiannopoulos, or their editorial efforts to make his ideas more palatable to the market.

The comments from Ivers came to wider attention when excerpts were posted to Twitter by software engineer Sarah Mei, who suggested some of them might make great observations to use in the future.

Dangerous was eventually self-published in July 2017. While Yiannopoulos claimed that it had sold 100,000 copies in its first few days on sale, data revealed that it had in fact sold fewer than 20,000.

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Milo Yiannopoulos ’10 Things I Hate About Mexico’ speech …

Conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos has had another campus speech cancelled, only this time it was college Republicans who pulled the plug. The UCLA Bruin Republicans nixed the event Wednesday, just one day after announcing that Mr. Yiannopoulos would appear Feb. 26 to deliver a speech entitled, 10 Things I Hate About Mexico. The invitation ignited an outcry, including an open letter from UCLA associate professor Gabriel Rossman, who has supported the Bruin Republicans but said he would disassociate himself from the student group if it went ahead with the event. The campus organization said it decided to disinvite Mr. Yiannopoulos over dissension within its ranks. The decision to host Milo has polarized the leadership of the organization between those wishing to move forward with the event and those who wish to cancel it, said the Bruin Republicans in a Wednesday post on Facebook. The club recently hosted climate skeptic Alex Epstein, author of The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels, while conservative author Dinesh DSouza spoke in January at an event hosted by the UCLA Freedom Coalition. In order for an organization to be able to function properly, it must do so with the unequivocal support of all its members, said the clubs notice. This does not mean that we all must agree 100% on all issues but we must have at least a clear majority. Consequently, we have decided not to move forward with the event. Mr. Yiannopoulos was disappointed by the cancellation. I despair at the trajectory of Californian universities. Even the students who describe themselves as Republicans seem hopelessly lost and weak, he said on Facebook. He also vowed to continue arranging speeches in California. His February 2017 talk at the University of California Berkeley was abruptly cancelled after leftist protesters rioted, setting fires and causing $100,000 in damage to the campus. Unlike previous generations of conservative and libertarian activists I refuse to simply hand over the keys to the wacko left, Mr. Yiannopoulos said. In the meantime I urge parents to reconsider sending your kids to these schools. Theyre not getting educated theyre getting indoctrinated. Chancellor Gene Block praised the decision to rescind the invitation. I hope we will all continue to resist such provocations and nurture our campus culture, which values ideas over hatred, he said in a campus email, as reported by the Daily Bruin. Mr. Rossman was also pleased. That the university respects free speech rights and that it was the clubs decision to make, is just as important as the outcome, he said in a post on the Weekly Standard.

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February 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’ UCLA talk on what he hates about Mexico …

“The title of the talk referenced what the speaker ‘hated’ about Mexico a country with deep ties to our city, our state and our nation. This is also a country that is an important part of the heritage of many Bruins,” he said. “The expression of disdain did not appear to be an attempt to engage in reasoned discussion, but rather a move by the speaker to gain notoriety through a mean-spirited, racially tinged publicity stunt.”

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos to Visit UCLA This Month for Talk, 10 …

Milo Yiannopoulos, the right-wing rabble-rouser whose campus appearances have sparked widespread protests, is headed to UCLA this month this time to talk about what he hates about Mexico. Conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos is headed to UCLA this month to talk about what he hates about Mexico. (Credit: Christina House / Los Angeles Times) Yiannopolos said he intends to take on Mexican patriarchy in his Feb. 26 talk, 10 Things I Hate About Mexico, which is being hosted by the Bruin Republicans. He said the talk is timely now as Congress moves to tackle immigration reform. [President] Trump and the Republicans make an economic and law-and-order case against uncontrolled immigration from Mexico. Im going to make the social justice case against importing any more of this particular culture into America, Yiannopoulos said in a text Wednesday. In other words, what would a third wave intersectional feminist, if she was being honest, say about Mexican society and culture, and in particular the rampant misogyny, corruption and patriarchal oppression that runs rampant throughout its ruling classes? To put it another way: What would runaway immigration from Mexico mean for women, people of color, queer people and trans folk? Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Open Letter to the Bruin Republicans who invited Milo …

Editors note: On February 13, UCLAs college Republican group, the Bruin Republicans, announced that they would be hosting Milo Yiannopoulos on campus to give a talk titled “10 Things I Hate About Mexico.” Gabriel Rossman is a professor of sociology at UCLA who recently became a friend and informal advisor to the Bruin Republicans. This is his response to the Yiannopoulos invitation. An open letter to the Bruin Republicans, I was very glad to meet everyone at a recent lunch. You seem to be a great group of students with serious aspirations and a strong interest in conservatism. As you will recall, in my remarks I expressed the hope that you would follow the traditional debating society model of the Harvard Republicans rather than the epater les SJWs performance art model of the University of Colorado Republicans as described in Binder and Woods Becoming Right. You will also recall a very specific corollary I mentioned: Do not invite Milo Yiannopoulos. It was for this reason that I was surprised when I learned Tuesday that you were doing exactly that, and for a talk entitled 10 Things I Hate About Mexico. One thing I left out of my remarks about the impact of the ideological skew of academia is that the dearth of conservative faculty means a lack of mentorship for conservative students. Which is part of the reason you see students at places such as University of Colorado engaging in ill-conceived political theater that can be amusing and provocativebut is ultimately counter-productive. As one of the few conservative faculty at UCLA, and one of a very few who knows the campus club, I feel obligated to provide some mentorship here: I strongly urge you to rescind your invitation to Yiannopoulos. Allow me to explain why. The most important reason not to host such a talk is that it is evil on the merits. Your conscience should tell you that you never want anything to do with someone whose entire career is not reasoned argument, but shock jock performance art. In the 1980s conservatives made fun of artists who defecated on stage for the purpose of upsetting conservatives. Now apparently, conservatives are willing to embrace a man who says despicable things for the purpose of triggering snowflakes. The change in performance art from the fecal era to the present is yet another sign that no matter how low civilization goes, there is still room for further decline. I want to be clear that my point here is not that some people will be offended, but that the speaker is purely malicious. Many speakers and many speeches will offend people, especially given the sense among many on the campus left that they are entitled to complete isolation from ideas with which they disagree. This is different. Looking at the fall quarter calendar, I see Richard Sander, Rafael Dagnesses, Keith Fink, and Ben Shapiro recently gave talks sponsored by your group. Lots of people disagree with these speakers, and I disagree with some of them about certain points, but none of them are malicious. I can understand why some people were offended by Heather Mac Donalds ideas when she spoke on campus last year. But reasonable people can disagree about whether all Americans, and especially African Americans, on net benefit from aggressive policing. More to the point, Mac Donald expresses her pro-police position without animus, so sponsoring her talk was an entirely legitimate and honorable thing to do. If the Bruin Republicans were considering a talk with a journalist or scholar giving a temperate and reasoned lecture on ten reasons why Mexicos social development lags, then it could be a very reasonable event to host, even if people were offended by it. I would also caution you to expect that speakers who take ideas seriously are often repelled by association with deliberately offensive speakers. For instance, when the organizers of Free Speech Week at Berkeley circulated a list of (proposed) speakers, Charles Murray told the Chronicle of Higher Education that he would never under any circumstances appear at an event that included Milo Yiannopoulos. Obviously, Murray is someone whose ideas many people find offensive, but he expresses them without hatred and so declines to appear with someone he (correctly) considers a despicable asshole. Likewise, I know many conservative writers, but I imagine an invitation would be much less attractive to them (nor would I extend it) if they had to bring Lysol to clean the podium from the prior occupant. There are other reasons not to associate yourselves with Yiannopoulos. Whether or not anyone notices, you want to be on the side of the person getting attacked for being a Jew (such as Ben Shapiro, who you have hosted before), not the person who mocks that Jew by dressing midgets in kippahs (and on a separate occasion debases America the Beautiful by singing it to an audience of giggling Nazis as they throw sieg heils). The merits are more important than appearances, of course, but the fact is that people will notice if the Bruin Republicans host someone offering nothing more than alt-right camp and this is a secondary reason not to do so. You need to ask yourselves, what is your goal as an organization? If youre in it for the lulz and just want to see the world burn, then I guess go ahead and bring in a vapid provocateur. But if your mission is to spread conservative ideas, you should recognize that hosting Yiannopoulos will only render your organization and our ideas toxic. The left often suspects that principled conservative positions are actually born of racism. Conservatives have traditionally pushed back against this criticism. Here at UCLA, that will be a much less tenable argument for Bruin Republicans to make if they host a talk by someone whose sole recommendation is that his offensiveness to others is his big idea. My understanding of the proposed Yiannopoulos event is that it is intended in part to be a fundraiser. Remember the question Jesus asks in the synoptic gospels, For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? In the case of the Bruin Republicans, the question is not poignant but pathetic: What does it profit a club to cover the costs of an eventand maybe get enough to cover an end-of-year partyif they lose their integrity and reputation. I am a strong believer in freedom of political speech. However, there is a distinction between tolerating speech and sponsoring speech. Neither I, nor you, nor Chancellor Block have the right to say that Milo Yiannopoulos cannot give a speech on campus. But neither does that mean that I, or you, or Chancellor Block needs to actively invite him and actively promote his childish provocations. If he wants to stand on Bruin Walk ranting with the other creeps and lunatics, he can do so. I believe people have the right to do all sorts of things in the privacy of their own homes, but that doesnt mean that I would invite them to do them in my living room for an audience of me and my dinner guests. If you go through with hosting Yiannopoulos, I will vociferously support your right to do soand the duty of the UCPD to use force if necessary to maintain order and prevent a hecklers veto. However, I must just as vehemently and publicly disagree with your decision to host him. Specifically, should the event go forward, I will decline to have any association with the Bruin Republicans until it has experienced a complete turnover in membership. I hope that will not be the case and that I can continue to support you. Sincerely,Gabriel Rossman Gabriel Rossman is an associate professor of sociology at UCLA.

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February 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Ann Coulter Shrugs Off ‘Law & Order: SVU’ Episode: ‘Why Don’t They Follow My Approach and Not Care?’

Thursday on Fox News Channel’s “The Ingraham Angle,” conservative commentator Ann Coulter reacted to an episode of NBC’s “Law & Order: SVU” from a night earlier that depicted the rape of a fictional conservative pundit that resembled her. Coulter referenced the Twitter banning of Milo Yiannopoulos allegedly for criticisms of “Saturday Night Live” cast member Leslie Jones and recommended celebrities follow her example and “not care.” She also called those involved with the creation of “Law & Order: SVU” hypocrites for their depiction of conservatives on immigration. “Why don’t they follow my approach and not care?” Coulter said. “But I do think it’s worth bringing up at this point also what just raging frauds and hypocrites they are. One of the things I read, I mean I read it in a Newsbusters write-up, wants to deport DREAMers. OK, Laura, I promise you the writers, the actors and the producers of this TV show — they will move heaven and earth to make sure their kids don’t go to school any place near a DREAMer. Their only contact with illegal aliens is the woman who cleans their toilet whose name they don’t know. Oh, but they’re going to stand up for the illegal aliens. So

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February 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Antifa vs. Milo Yiannopoulos: Who won? – Salon.com

This dramatic decline in his public appearances over the past year is directly correlated with the precedent set in February 2017 at Berkeley. Love it or hate it, images of targeted property destruction in northern California provided a powerful incentive for venues to avoid potential headaches. Reasonable people will disagree about the influence of the Berkeley protest on Yiannopoulos plummet. What is not debatable, however, is that media predictions about the inevitable ascent of Milo Yiannopoulos after getting shut down in Berkeley were wrong. A year later, already banned from Twitter, Yiannopoulos now has no access to media platforms like Breitbart and the Daily Caller, no publisher for his books, no mega-donors to bankroll him and dwindling opportunities for public speaking. In an age of social media and 24-hour cable news cycles, Yiannopoulos is already old news. The short-lived nature of his stardom is even evident on Google Trends which shows that after spiking in early 2017, the frequency of subsequent Google searches for his name have plunged to 2016 levels. Yet, this discussion misses the most crucial aspect of protests at Berkeley, Rutgers, DePaul, UCLA and other campuses. Pundits asked how protests would affect Milo Yiannopoulos public profile. They failed to ask more important questions: How do Yiannopoulos events and the rhetoric he spews endanger those he targets, and how can they fight back? How these protests affect Yiannopoulos (or otherfar-right figures like Richard Spencer or Ann Coulter) is interesting; how they affect resistance to the far right is essential. Lost in such debates is the astoundingmobilization over recent years of a broad anti-racist movement encompassing Black Lives Matter groups, labor unions, faith communities, immigrants rights coalitions, anti-fascist networks, feminist collectives and LGBTQ organizations that will not just ignore attempts to make white supremacy great again. We must situate the property destruction at Berkeley, heckling at UMASS Amherst, the air horns at Minnesota, the blockade at UC Davis, and other acts of disruption within this process of movement-building to understand their full effect.

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February 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos will represent himself in Simon & Schuster …

(Photo: Getty Images, Lisa Maree Williams) In the entire U.S. legal system, the biggest power move you can makeother than bringing in bags and bags of letters to Santais to fire your legal counsel and go rogue. It sends a very clear message that youre someone who knows exactly what to do, has no interest in messing around, and will only be held back by professional advice. Unfortunately, its also an indication that you might be dangerously overconfident, and youre willing to let your narcissism torpedo your entire case. Anyway, Milo Yiannopoulos has reportedly split from his lawyer in his big Simon & Schuster lawsuit, with The Hills Will Sommer reporting that Yiannopoulos and the lawyer had some kind of fundamental disagreement that has made the relationship untenable. Naturally, Yiannopouloswho is suing the publisher for cancelling his book dealwill now be representing himself in the $10 million lawsuit, and whether it ends up working in his favor or not, it should be pretty entertaining to watch. This also comes not long after the editors notes for the book were released, proving that Yiannopoulos editor had just about as much patience for his bullshit as the rest of us. Theres no word on if hes planning to bring in letters to Santa yet, though.

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January 14, 2018   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Berkeley cancels Milo Yiannopoulos talk after violent …

The university blamed “150 masked agitators” for the unrest, saying they had come to campus to disturb an otherwise peaceful protest. Two Berkeley College Republicans “were attacked while conducting an interview” on the campus on Thursday, UC Berkeley also said in a prepared statement. The attackers, who were not affiliated with the university, were taken into custody by UC Berkeley police. Administrators decided to cancel the Wednesday event about two hours before the Breitbart editor’s speech. UC Berkeley said it removed him from campus “amid the violence and destruction of property and out of concern for public safety.” Black-clad protesters wearing masks threw commercial-grade fireworks and rocks at police. Some even hurled Molotov cocktails that ignited fires. They also smashed windows of the student union center on the Berkeley campus where the Yiannopoulos event was to be held. At least six people were injured. Some were attacked by the agitators — who are a part of an anarchist group known as the “Black Bloc” that has been causing problems in Oakland for years, said Dan Mogulof, UC Berkeley spokesman. More than 1,500 protesters had gathered at Sproul Plaza, chanting and holding signs that read: “No safe space for racists” and “This is war.” As the scene spiraled out of control, university police warned protesters to disperse and issued a lockdown for campus buildings. “While Yiannopoulos’ views, tactics and rhetoric are profoundly contrary to our own, we are bound by the Constitution, the law, our values and the campus’s Principles of Community to enable free expression across the full spectrum of opinion and perspective,” it stated. As police dispersed the crowd from campus, a remaining group of protesters moved into downtown Berkeley and smashed windows at several local banks. No arrests were made throughout the night. Yiannopoulos on college speaking tour Yiannopoulos had been invited to speak by the Berkeley College Republicans. He has been on a college speaking tour and had planned to speak about cultural appropriation on Wednesday. In a Facebook Live video, Yiannopoulos described what happened as “an expression of political violence.” “I’m just stunned that hundreds of people … were so threatened by the idea that a conservative speaker might be persuasive, interesting, funny and might take some people with him, they have to shut it down at all costs.” President Donald Trump weighed in on Twitter, suggesting the possibility of cutting federal funds to the public university. “If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view — NO FEDERAL FUNDS?” Trump tweeted Thursday morning. Later, Yiannopoulos posted Trump’s tweet to Facebook and proclaimed himself “the catalyst for this change.” “American universities are on notice. The President is watching,” he wrote. “The days you could silence conservative and libertarian voices on campus and still expect to collect their tax money are coming to an end.” But some protesters said the Yiannopoulos event wasn’t a matter of free speech, because he espouses hate speech. UC Berkeley said it had prepared security measures following what had happened at Yiannopoulos’ previous events. One of his planned speaking engagements at UC Davis was also canceled last month in response to protests. “Ultimately, and unfortunately, however, it was impossible to maintain order given the level of threat, disruption and organized violence,” UC Berkeley said in a statement. Most UC Berkeley students who spoke with CNN said they were relieved that Yiannopoulos wasn’t able to speak, but this was not how they wanted to accomplish that goal. One student told CNN that he didn’t agree with what happened. “It’s a sad irony in the fact that the Free Speech Movement was founded here and tonight, someone’s free speech got shut down. It might have been hateful speech, but it’s still his right to speak,” said Shivam Patel, a freshmen who stood outside of Sproul Plaza. The Free Speech Movement started at UC Berkeley in 1964 after students protested en masse when administrators tried to restrict their political activities on campus. Patel said he supported peaceful protests, but disagreed with the way things turned out on Wednesday. “It allows people on the right to say, ‘Look at all these liberal Berkeley snowflakes. They’re intolerant of speech.’ I don’t think it’s productive at all. It does nothing to help this country.”

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January 12, 2018   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’ book – theguardian.com

Court documents filed in the US have revealed the editorial concerns of the publisher Simon & Schuster about the manuscript of the alt-right controversialist Milo Yiannopouloss autobiography Dangerous. Having reportedly secured the book for an advance of $255,000 (200,000), Simon & Schuster cancelled the deal in February after a recording emerged that appeared to show Yiannopoulos endorsing sex between younger boys and older men. In July, Yiannopoulos set out to sue Simon & Schuster for $10m for breach of contract. As part of the case, Simon & Schuster have submitted documents that reveal the problems they had with the book. Among other criticisms, the publishers notes say Yiannopoulos needed a stronger argument against feminism than saying that they are ugly and sexless and have cats and that another chapter needs a better central thesis than the notion that gay people should go back in the closet. In addition to the documents, a full copy of an early manuscript of the book, complete with the Simon & Schuster editor Mitchell Iverss notes, is available to download from the New York state courts website. The tone is set in notes on the prologue to the manuscript. Ivers writes to Yiannopoulos: Throughout the book, your best points seem to be lost in a sea of self-aggrandizement and scattershot thinking, and adds: Careful that the egotistical boasting doesnt make you seem juvenile. Add something like this only less self-serving reads another comment early in the manuscript. Ivers frequently calls on Yiannopoulos to back up his assertions in the text. In the first nine pages of chapter one, notes include: Citations needed, Do you have proof of this?, Unsupportable charge and Cite examples. Yiannopoulos was permanently banned from Twitter in 2016 after his role in the online harassment of the Ghostbusters actor Leslie Jones. The editor makes several notes asking the author to tone down racism in the text. Delete irrelevant and superfluous ethnic joke, Ivers writes of a passage about taxi drivers. Lets not call South Africa white is another request, while elsewhere Yiannopoulos is reprimanded for using the phrase dark continent about Africa. Yiannopoulos, who was filmed singing America the Beautiful while the white nationalist leader Richard Spencer and others gave the Hitler salute in the audience, is also criticised for attempting to suggest that the Hollywood left is more racist than Nazis. I dont like using Nazi analogies. Ever, is the editors note. Yiannopoulos is repeatedly warned his choice of words is undermining any argument he is attempting to make. The use of phrases like two-faced backstabbing bitches diminishes your overall point, reads one comment. Too important a point to end in a crude quip is another. Unclear, unfunny, delete, reads another. The early sections of a chapter on feminism prompt the note: Dont start chapter with accusation that feminists = fat. It destroys any seriousness of purpose. Yiannopoulos goes on to criticise contemporary feminism as merely a capitalist con-job a money-grab designed to sell T-shirts to Taylor Swift and Beyonc fans with asinine slogans. Um like your MILO SWAG? the editor responds. Iverss evident exasperation becomes clear by page 84, where Yiannopouloss call for lesbians to be thrown out of academia altogether simply elicits the all-upper-case comment: DELETE UGH. On Wednesday, Ivers retweeted without comment Publishing Perspectives Editor-in-Chief Porter Anderson pointing out that Ivers overall review described the book as at best, a superficial work full of incendiary jokes with no coherent or sophisticated analysis of political issues. However, the emergence of the notes have not allowed Simon & Schuster to escape continued criticism for their initial striking of a deal with Yiannopoulos, or their editorial efforts to make his ideas more palatable to the market. The comments from Ivers came to wider attention when excerpts were posted to Twitter by software engineer Sarah Mei, who suggested some of them might make great observations to use in the future. Dangerous was eventually self-published in July 2017. While Yiannopoulos claimed that it had sold 100,000 copies in its first few days on sale, data revealed that it had in fact sold fewer than 20,000.

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December 29, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed


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