Archive for the ‘Milo Yiannopoulos’ Category

Milo Yiannopoulos’ ‘Free Speech Week’ At Berkeley Falls Apart …

After days of uncertainty, an event at the University of California, Berkeley, touted as “Free Speech Week” by organizers including far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos has been canceled. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

After days of uncertainty, an event at the University of California, Berkeley, touted as “Free Speech Week” by organizers including far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos has been canceled.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

“Free Speech Week,” a four-day, right-wing rally at the University of California, Berkeley, has been called off, student organizers of the event tell member station KQED.

Another organizer, controversial far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos, will reportedly hold a press conference on Saturday formally canceling the event, which was scheduled to start Sunday. A spokesperson for Yiannopoulos told KQED on Friday that he “couldn’t confirm” the event would happen.

The event fell apart after the co-organizers The Berkeley Patriot, an online publication, and Yiannopoulos failed to confirm the guest list and book multiple indoor venues on campus.

Tensions and confusion mounted this week ahead of the event, which organizers said was planned in response to Berkeley’s efforts to shut down conservative speakers.

A fierce debate about free speech on campus ignited in February when the university canceled an appearance by former Breitbart editor Yiannopoulos because of security concerns.

Steve Bannon, former adviser to President Trump, and conservative commentator Ann Coulter were reportedly scheduled to speak at this weekend’s event, but their appearances were never confirmed. Coulter had also been scheduled to appear at Berkeley in April, but her speech was abruptly canceled and protests followed.

The confusion around whether Bannon and Coulter would appear is “part of the whole chaos” in the runup to the Berkeley event, said John Sepulvado, host of KQED’s The California Report.

“It is part of the M.O. of these activities … to be as confusing and disorienting as possible,” Sepulvado told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson earlier this week.

Since Yiannopoulos’ appearance was canceled earlier this year, students and right-wing groups have criticized Berkeley widely considered to be one of the centers of the free speech movement in the 1960s for shutting down conservative speech. Berkeley officials say the school is committed to preserving free speech but at the same time must protect safety on campus.

Yiannopoulos posted a YouTube video this week saying the university is using “slippery and bureaucratic tactics” to try to prevent the event from happening.

The university did not try to cancel the event outright, as Yiannopoulos suggests, but a group of about 130 professors, graduate students and lecturers called for a boycott of classes and university events next week.

An open letter argued that many students, faculty and staff would feel unsafe at school because of the anti-immigrant, anti-female, anti-gay rhetoric of many of the speakers. They also expressed fears that there might be an “uncontrollable confrontation” during the week.

What about the legality of such rhetoric? Hate speech is protected under the First Amendment, in part because there isn’t a legal definition of it, says Santa Clara University law professor Margaret Russell.

A person can only be prosecuted for a specific crime associated with the hate speech but not the speech on its own, she explains.

“I think the law is pretty clear, at least to the extent that hate speech is not considered, by itself, to be unprotected under the First Amendment,” Russell told Hobson in February. “So, if people want to enact laws or if people want to prosecute people who violate the law, the prosecution can’t be based on the viewpoint of the person. It has to be based on the underlying crime.”

The free speech debate has grown more contentious in light of the growing number of nationwide protests since Trump took office. In August, a woman was killed after a group of white supremacists and neo-Nazis at a “Unite the Right” rally violently clashed with counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va.

Sepulvado of KQED says it’s no coincidence the far-right is using Berkeley one of the most liberal cities in the U.S. as the center of this debate.

“It’s become a center of far-right speech because the far-right has taken the tactic and Milo Yiannopoulos being the prime example of essentially trolling people who wouldn’t want to hear it and that’s what this is,” Sepulvado said. “When I talked to Berkeley Patriot, and I said, you know, ‘What is the academic value of having Ann Coulter or Milo Yiannopoulos speak on campus?’ They say there isn’t any. They are the first to acknowledge that there is no academic value.”

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December 5, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos Resigns From Breitbart After … – NPR

Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a news conference Tuesday in which he announced his resignation as a senior editor with Breitbart News. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a news conference Tuesday in which he announced his resignation as a senior editor with Breitbart News.

Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos has resigned amid a social media backlash over comments he made that appeared to condone pedophilia.

In a news conference Tuesday, Yiannopoulos said his resignation was effective immediately and praised the website as “a significant factor in my success.”

He also explained his views on sex with minors, insisting that he does not condone statutory rape.

“I do not believe any change in the legal age of consent is justifiable or desirable,” Yiannopoulos said. He was referring to comments in live-streamed interviews more than a year ago in which he said, “We get hung up on this kind of child abuse stuff,” and referenced, “this arbitrary and oppressive idea of consent.”

“I said some things on those Internet live streams that were simply wrong,” he said Tuesday.

He also said that he had been sexually abused as a child.

Yiannopoulos’ resignation comes one day after he lost both a prominent speaking gig at a conservative meeting and a book deal.

As The Two Way reported:

“First, Monday afternoon the American Conservative Union rescinded its invitation to the right-wing provocateur noted for his political posts on the Internet to speak at its annual Conservative Political Action Conference this upcoming weekend. Then, a few hours later, Simon & Schuster announced that it was canceling the publication of Yiannopoulos’ upcoming book, Dangerous.

“These actions come in the wake of a social media backlash against Yiannopoulos after the conservative news outlet The Reagan Battalion tweeted videos on Sunday in which Yiannopoulos appears to condone statutory rape and sexual relationships between boys and men.”

Yiannopoulos had tried to clarify his comments Monday on Facebook, defending his remarks and referencing his own sexual history while also blaming his own “sloppy phrasing” and “deceptive” video editing.

He said Tuesday that other publishers had expressed interest in his book, and that he expected it to be published this year. He also said he was founding an “independently funded media venture” and would be going on a “live tour in the coming weeks,” including appearances on college campuses.

Earlier this month, a Yiannopoulos speaking engagement at the University of California, Berkeley was canceled after students protests turned violent.

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Milo Yiannopoulos Resigns From Breitbart After … – NPR

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December 1, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO – YouTube

Shame they cut it short!

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DANGEROUS: The Audiobook available now on Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/y75s2p84

MILO’s book DANGEROUS, published by Dangerous Books, available now at https://DANGEROUS.com

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MILO – YouTube

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

The Milo Yiannopoulos shtick shows the disconnect between …

For many, the lasting image of Milo Yiannopoulos in his fizzled Free Speech Week appearance on the UC Berkeley campus will be of the selfie he took as he was surrounded by a small throng of admirers and journalists.

For me, however, it will be the vast, empty space of Sproul Plaza, barricaded by orange Jersey barriers, moments after Yiannopoulos left.

On the very spot in 1964 where Mario Savio, surrounded by thousands, famously commandeered the roof of a police car to demand that students be allowed to express their political opinions, there was nothing and nobody, a potent metaphor for a ginned-up Free Speech Week starring the puerile Yiannopoulos. (How puerile is he? One of the signs he held high on Sunday said, Feminism is cancer.)

Courtesy of UC Berkeley

This is what free speech looks like: Mario Savio on top of police car on Sproul Plaza on Oct 1. 1964

This is what free speech looks like: Mario Savio on top of police car on Sproul Plaza on Oct 1. 1964 (Courtesy of UC Berkeley)

You could say Free Speech Week backfired; after all, none of the high-profile speakers (Stephen K. Bannon, Ann Coulter) touted by Yiannopoulos turned up, none of the proper permits were secured by the tiny student group that sponsored him, nor any of the required fees paid.

Sure, Yiannopoulos still came on campus after all, speakers cannot be barred from the public square but he would have no microphone, no bullhorn and really, not much of an audience because few people were able to get past the single security checkpoint by the time he arrived on campus just after noon.

For Yiannopoulous, though, it was a ringing success. He not only highlighted the hypocrisy of students who give lip service to free speech while trying to curtail it, but got a spectacular amount of publicity to boot.

The most expensive photo op in UC Berkeley history, declared the university spokesman, who estimated that about $800,000 was spent on security for the stunt.

Law enforcement officers had come from all over the state; a handful of sheriffs deputies came from Kings County, five police officers came from Taft, four from Corcoran. Your tax dollars at work, all in service of a self-regarding chaos agent who has become frightfully adept at exploiting the intellectual weak spots of left-leaning college students and, sadly, too many of their professors.

Once again, a circus clown of the far right, whose rich benefactors have a stake in keeping the culture wars alive, had conceived and executed a plan to back the university and its overwhelmingly liberal community into a corner over the issue of speech.

University administrators and hundreds of police officers behaved magnificently.

I wish I could say the same for everyone else.

::

At a moment when President Trump has told black professional athletes to shut up about their politics, called them vulgar names and urged team owners to fire players for expressing themselves in peaceful and powerful ways, its hard to overstate the irony of conservatives coming to Berkeley to give lectures about free speech.

And yet, Berkeley needs the lesson.

There is a distressing disconnect here between respect for the concept of free speech and respect for its exercise.

On Sunday, I observed several discussions between Cal students and practiced right-wing provocateurs who had come to campus to support Yiannopoulos and, if possible, increase their internet profiles. Some conversations were rational; most devolved into shouting matches.

Ben Bergquam, who runs an obscure Facebook page called Frontline Radio, was egging on black and Latina students, insisting the phrase La Raza is inherently racist, and insisting bizarrely that most people who call themselves African Americans have never been to Africa. (Not sure what his point was, but as soon as he said it, Viana Maria Roland, a black woman with long braids, stopped him in his tracks when she replied, I have been to Africa four times.)

Millie Weaver, a Valkyrie-braided agitator from InfoWars, the website of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones (who has promulgated disgusting misinformation about the murders of first-graders in Newtown, and spread hallucinatory rumors about Hillary Clinton and a Washington pizza parlor), argued with Camila Elizabet Aguirre Aguilar about structural racism and reparations. A very frustrated Aguirre Aguilar eventually told Weaver to shut up I could not totally blame her thus giving Weaver the sound bite of which she had undoubtedly dreamed.

I guess I came here to vent a little bit, Im not gonna lie, Aguirre Aguilar told me afterward. Im angry about everything thats going on. Free speech once sought to legitimize the oppressed, and now it has been appropriated to legitimize oppression. The right to free speech is different from the right to having a platform.

I appreciate her sincerity, and her willingness to show up to debate. But that sentiment, which I have heard many times from Berkeley students, gives me chills. Free speech is meaningless without a platform. Students at the nations foremost public university should not just understand that concept, but embrace it.

::

How is it that the cradle of campus free speech has become a place where disagreeable speech must be drowned out or driven away?

I shuddered last week when I heard a Cal associate French professor tell KPCCs Larry Mantle that she was taking her students off campus for classes this week, for their safety.

Good lord, why not teach them the immortal words of Eleanor Roosevelt: No one can make you feel inferior without your consent? Or even remind them of the childhood aphorism, Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me?

How did skin here get so thin?

The new chancellor of Cal, Carol T. Christ, recently offered the most cogent explanation that I have heard.

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The Milo Yiannopoulos shtick shows the disconnect between …

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos coordinated work with neo-Nazis: report …

Former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos coordinated some of his work with neo-Nazis that he publicly distanced himself from, according to a report.

British-born Yiannopoulos has said he is a fellow traveler of the alt-right a group of far-right supporters who include white nationalists and neo-Nazis while shying away from backing its most extremist elements.

But emails revealed in a Buzzfeed report Thursday show that the 32-year-old reached out to and received input on his work from prominent hateful figures.

For an explanation on the alt right last year, Yiannopoulos is reported to have received help and editing from neo-Nazi website Daily Stormers Andrew Auernheimer, feudalist Curtis Yarvin and white nationalist Devin Saucier.

Berkeley cancels ‘Free Speech Week’

Other details in the Buzzfeed piece, which chronicles Yiannopouloss relationships to other Breibart figures such as former White House strategist Steve Bannon and the billionaire Mercer family, include that his passwords appear to be based off of the Nazi violence of Kristallnacht and the Night of the Long Knives purge.

A video published with the report shows him singing America the Beautiful at karaoke while some in a crowd that includes white supremacist Richard Spencer give Nazi salutes.

Breitbart has threatened legal action against those who say Yiannopoulos is racist, and the internet personality himself told Buzzfeed everyone who knows me also knows I’m not a racist.

He said that he is of Jewish ancestry and supports Jews but finds humor in breaking taboos and laughing at things that people tell me are forbidden to joke about.

Milo Yiannopoulos claims Hurricane Irma destroyed his Miami home

Yiannopoulos also said he was joking when he appeared to condone pedophilia in a podcast interview last year, a clip of which ultimately lead to his resignation from Breitbart.

The departure occurred while Bannon, who is seen coaching Yiannopoulos on media appearances and article angles in some emails, had left Breitbart to work for Trump, which lasted until August.

Yiannopoulos is now working on his own media brand, MILO Inc., which Buzzfeed and Playboy last month reported is funded by the Breitbart-backing Mercer family, a major Trump donor.

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos Is Starting a New, Ugly, For-Profit Troll …

Milo Yiannopoulos, the former tech editor at Breitbart, has made political provocations, often deeply offensive ones, a business model. But his career seemed to come crashing down in recent months when one of his speaking appearances, at the University of California, Berkeley, led to riots. Weeks later, videos emerged of Yiannopoulos seeming to condone pedophilia. (I do not support pedophilia. Period. It is a vile and disgusting crime, perhaps the very worst, Yiannopoulos said in a statement on Facebook at the time.)

Yet his allies turned on him. Yiannopoulos was subsequently forced out of Breitbart in disgrace. The American Conservative Union disinvited him from CPAC, and Simon & Schuster canceled a six-figure book deal.

But as the free-speech conflagration he ignited at Berkeley continues to burn, Yiannopoulos is planning a way back in. Days after releasing a video touting his return to the campus, Yiannopoulos told the Hive that he would be launching a new media venture in the coming weeks with what he says is a $12 million investment from backers whose identities he is protecting. (Yiannopoulos showed me a page from the contract with the investors’ names blacked out.) Another person involved with the company, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, was similarly secretive: “Milo has the best instincts about these things,” he said.

The business, which will be called Milo Inc., will be even more focused on stoking the sort of ugly political conflict that’s closer to the surface than ever in these early months of the Trump administration. As Fox News remains busy with its latest scandal, Milo Inc. promises to be the latest incumbent in a growing far-right media sphere that is overwhelmingly populated with politically incorrect, and often jarring, provocations once considered verboten by conservatives. Yiannopolos will compete not only against sites such as TheBlaze and Alex Jones’s Infowars but also against his very own former employer, Breitbart, which has become a formidable force in the space after its former chairman, Steve Bannon, helped usher Trump to victory and later joined his administration. Yiannopoulos, for his part, is relying on a formula that he employed at Breitbart. He said that Milo Inc. would be dedicated to making the lives of journalists, professors, politicians, feminists, Black Lives Matter activists, and other professional victims a living hell.

Milo Inc., according to a press release, will be based in Miami, with a planned staff of 30. It will be in the business of what can be best described as corporatized trolling via live entertainment, with Yiannopoulos and his investors hosting events featuring right-wing talent. The business of Madonna became touring, said Yiannopoulos in a phone interview, citing the artists deal with Live Nation. Im doing the same thing, but instead of signing up with Live Nation, Im building one. Im building it for libertarian and conservative comedians, writers, stand-up comics, intellectuals, you name it.

Milo Inc.’s first event will be a return to the town that erupted in riots when he was invited to speak earlier this year. In fact, Yiannopoulos said that he is planning a week-long celebration of free speech near U.C. Berkeley, where a speech by his fellow campus agitator, Ann Coulter, was recently canceled after threats of violence. It will culminate in his bestowing something called the Mario Savio Award for Free Speech. (The son of Savio, one of the leaders of Berkeley’s Free Speech movement during the mid-1960s, called the award some kind of sick joke.)

Initially, Yiannopolos will be the company’s main talent. Im the proof of concept, he said, but added that he hoped to eventually expand the company. The thing about me is that I have access to a talent pipeline that no one else even knows about. All the funniest, smartest, most interesting young YouTubers and all the rest of them who hate feminism, who hate political correctness. This generation thats coming up, its about 13, 14, 15, now have very different politics than most other generations. They love us. They love me, and Im going to be actively hunting around for the next Milo.

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October 19, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

The fall of Milo Yiannopoulos, explained – Vox

Milo Yiannopoulos finally went too far for conservatives. On Monday, he lost his book deal, and his speech at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) was canceled. And on Tuesday, he resigned from the ultra-conservative website Breitbart.

But it wasnt his racism, sexism, transphobia, or other kinds of bigotry that led to Yiannopouloss fall. Nope. After all that, its comments apparently supporting child molestation that did Yiannopoulos in.

Heres the backstory: Over the weekend, it was revealed that Yiannopoulos was invited to give a speech at CPAC, the biggest mainstream conservative conference in America. That sparked a lot of outrage particularly among the left, which pointed out that Yiannopoulos has a long history of making all sorts of bigoted comments.

But liberal outrage wasnt what got CPAC to pull the plug or Yiannopoulos to resign from Breitbart. Instead, the final straw was a video resurfaced by the conservative website Reagan Battalion in which Yiannopoulos defended the idea of 13 year olds having sex with older men, referencing his own story that he benefited from a priest molesting him when he was a teenager.

In the homosexual world, particularly, some of those relationships between younger boys and older men the sort of coming of age relationships the relationships in which those older men help those young boys to discover who they are and give them security and safety and provide them with love and a reliable sort of rock, Yiannopoulos said.

That, apparently, was the tipping point for CPAC. In a statement, CPAC organizers said they originally invited Yiannopoulos, whose speaking event at a college campus had to be canceled because it literally caused riots, to stand up for free speech but that Yiannopouloss comments on child molestation went too far.

Due to the revelation of an offensive video in the past 24 hours condoning pedophilia, the American Conservative Union has decided to rescind the invitation of Milo Yiannopoulos to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference, American Conservative Union Chair Matt Schlapp said in a statement.

Yiannopoulos has since apologized. In a Facebook post, he clarified that he doesnt believe pedophilia and child molestation are okay: I would like to restate my utter disgust at adults who sexually abuse minors. I am horrified by pedophilia and I have devoted large portions of my career as a journalist to exposing child abusers.

As for his actual remarks, he explained, As to some of the specific claims being made, sometimes things tumble out of your mouth on these long, late-night live-streams, when everyone is spit-balling, that are incompletely expressed or not what you intended. Nonetheless, I’ve reviewed the tapes that appeared last night in their proper full context and I don’t believe they say what is being reported. (Who among us hasnt accidentally defended child molestation on a late-night live stream?)

But the apology didnt stop the enormous backlash. Later in the afternoon, Simon & Schuster and Threshold Editions announced that they have canceled their book deal with Yiannopoulos. And under apparent pressure from Breitbart staff who demanded Yiannopouloss resignation, he quit on Tuesday.

For many people, the whole controversy has raised more questions than answers. Why was it that it took something as low and awful as support for child molestation to finally get conservatives to disown Yiannopoulos? What about all the bigotry he has pushed in the past? Why were those other remarks not enough?

Whats remarkable about this whole affair is how unsurprising it is. The video that the Reagan Battalion resurfaced has been around since July 2016. And Yiannopoulos has a long history of making offensive, provocative remarks; its what hes known for. It was totally predictable that a mainstream conservative groups attempt to reach out to someone whos basically an internet troll would blow up in some way yet the fact CPAC and other conservatives even felt compelled to reach out to someone like Yiannopoulos says a lot about conservatism today.

As journalist Nicole Hemmer explained, none of this should be surprising to anyone: As someone whos been on this beat for a while: everything youre learning about Milo has been public for ages. CPAC made its choice.

Yiannopoulos, after all, has a long history of offensive remarks. Here are a few examples:

This is who Yiannopoulos is: As my colleague Zack Beauchamp explained, his entire shtick is to say something inflammatory, anger a whole lot of people, get widespread media attention, refuse to back down, and say he did it all to stand up for free speech because no one can control what he says. Yiannopoulos pushes the boundaries just enough to force this chain of events, which conveniently prop him up as a hero.

But Yiannopouloss child molestation remarks crossed the line. For one, condoning child molestation goes too far for just about everyone, regardless of political party.

But the remarks also may have crossed the line because they played into longstanding conservative fears about gay men specifically, the myth that theres a link between homosexuality and pedophilia.

The Family Research Council, a conservative anti-LGBTQ group, still promotes this myth on its website. And it was used in the past to demonize gay men and block the advancement of gay rights such as, retired UC Davis professor Gregory Herek explained, in 1977, when Anita Bryant campaigned successfully to repeal a Dade County (FL) ordinance prohibiting anti-gay discrimination, she named her organization Save Our Children, and warned that a particularly deviant-minded [gay] teacher could sexually molest children. (The empirical research shows there is no scientific basis to this myth.)

In this context, Yiannopouloss support of child molestation as a gay man played into preexisting conservative fears about homosexuality, making him a particularly alarming figure. That, coupled with societys total rejection of pedophilia, may have contributed to Yiannopouloss fall leading not just to a lost book deal and canceled speech, but to him quitting from Breitbart, the media outlet where he made so many of his past offensive remarks.

In the past, Yiannopoulos has explained away his offensive remarks by arguing that hes simply standing up for free speech. This was the tack he took when he appeared on Bill Mahers show over the weekend.

All I care about is free speech and free expression, he said. I want people to be able to be, do, and say anything.

To this end, he points to college campuses as evidence of liberal political correctness running amok in a way thats stifled free speech. He can claim some personal experience here, like the time anti-fascists rioted at UC Berkeley when he was scheduled to give a speech there and forced him to cancel his event. But this is part of a broader conservative talking point about trigger warnings, safe spaces, and other examples of left-leaning students on college campuses doing things that, according to critics, stifle free speech.

This isnt something thats exclusive to conservatives. Maher, who identifies as liberal, appeared to invite Yiannopoulos to his show at least in part because he agrees that liberals are too sensitive to speech that they disagree with. You make liberals crazy for that part of liberalism that has gone off the deep end, Maher told Yiannopoulos.

But other liberals have argued that this supposed defense of free speech is really just a ruse to say all sorts of racist, sexist, and bigoted things.

ThinkProgress editor Judd Legum pointed out, for example, that despite CPACs claim that it invited Yiannopoulos to defend his free speech rights, they disinvited him when his speech went too far for them. The racism, sexism, and other offensive remarks were apparently fine, but it was the support for child molestation that apparently crossed a line.

After all, CPAC knew of Yiannopouloss past offensive remarks. Its one of the reasons people rioted in Berkeley, decried Yiannopouloss invitation to Mahers show, and told CPAC not to invite Yiannopoulos in the first place.

Yet CPAC invited him, publishers signed book deals with him, and Breitbart employed him anyway at least until his pro-pedophilia comments surfaced.

The entire debacle, however, shows a broader issue: Modern conservatism has a huge problem with bigotry in its ranks.

Consider Donald Trump. He called Mexican immigrants rapists who are bringing crime and bringing drugs to the US during his campaign launch event. He proposed banning Muslims, an entire religious group, from entering the US. He argued that a federal judge overseeing the Trump University lawsuit should be disqualified because of his Mexican heritage. And at campaign events and as president, he has spoken of black people through coded language that suggests all black people live in jobless, crime-ridden inner cities and all may even work for the Congressional Black Caucus.

Whats more, racism and xenophobia appeared to predict support for Trump. One telling study, conducted by researchers at UC Santa Barbara and Stanford shortly before the election, found that if people who strongly identified as white were told that nonwhite groups will outnumber white people in 2042, they became more likely to support Trump suggesting theres a significant racial element to his support.

And this doesnt even get into the other offensive remarks Trump has made, including about sexual assault like when he said he can grab women by the genitals and get away with it because hes a celebrity.

Yet Trump won the Republican primary and, ultimately, the 2016 general election. Hes not only continued to get the backing of the Republican Party but is also scheduled to talk at CPAC this week.

Or consider Yiannopouloss resignation from Breitbart one of the most read news outlets on the right, based on online traffic numbers. Breitbart is a news outlet that has run all sorts of explicitly racist, sexist, and bigoted articles. That was, apparently, fine under the websites editorial standards. But once Yiannopouloss pro-pedophilia remarks surfaced, only then did he apparently go too far for Breitbart.

Some conservatives have looked at all of this in shock and horror. Conservative pundit Glenn Beck, for one, has become a top critic on the right of the Trump administration. In one instance, after Trump appointed former Breitbart head and alt-right champion Steve Bannon in November as his chief strategist, Beck suggested that Americans are racist if they let Trump keep Bannon in charge.

When people really understand what the alt-right is, this neo-nationalist, neo-Nazi, white supremacy idea that Bannon is pushing hard, Beck said, I hope they wake up because, if not, we are racist. If thats what we accept and we know it, then we are racist. I contend people dont know what the alt-right is yet.

But Beck seems to represent a minority on the right, given Trumps ascendance to the White House and his continued support from Republicans.

Conservatives apathy to such racism, misogyny, and other offensive remarks is how CPAC and other conservatives could overlook Yiannopouloss racism, sexism, and other kinds of bigotry when they touted him as a free speech champion only to consider his child molestation comments beyond the boundaries of accepted free speech.

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The fall of Milo Yiannopoulos, explained – Vox

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Reports: Trump ‘Embarrassed and Pissed’ by Strange Endorsement Mistake, ‘Especially Upset’ at Bannon’s Role in Moore Victory

President Donald Trump hugs U.S. Senate candidate Luther Strange during a campaign rally, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
White House sources claim President Donald Trump is “embarrassed” over the outcome of Tuesday’s Alabama U.S. Senate election and understands he made a mistake in endorsing Luther Strange over Judge Roy Moore.

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Reports: Trump ‘Embarrassed and Pissed’ by Strange Endorsement Mistake, ‘Especially Upset’ at Bannon’s Role in Moore Victory

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September 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Ann Coulter: When Life Gives You Paul Ryan, Make Lemonade


It is now clear that Republicans are incapable of giving us a free market in health insurance, so it continues to be illegal in America to buy health plans that don’t cover shrinks, domestic violence counseling, and HIV screening, and perhaps always shall be.

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Ann Coulter: When Life Gives You Paul Ryan, Make Lemonade

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September 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’ ‘Free Speech Week’ At Berkeley Falls Apart …

After days of uncertainty, an event at the University of California, Berkeley, touted as “Free Speech Week” by organizers including far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos has been canceled. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption After days of uncertainty, an event at the University of California, Berkeley, touted as “Free Speech Week” by organizers including far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos has been canceled. Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET “Free Speech Week,” a four-day, right-wing rally at the University of California, Berkeley, has been called off, student organizers of the event tell member station KQED. Another organizer, controversial far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos, will reportedly hold a press conference on Saturday formally canceling the event, which was scheduled to start Sunday. A spokesperson for Yiannopoulos told KQED on Friday that he “couldn’t confirm” the event would happen. The event fell apart after the co-organizers The Berkeley Patriot, an online publication, and Yiannopoulos failed to confirm the guest list and book multiple indoor venues on campus. Tensions and confusion mounted this week ahead of the event, which organizers said was planned in response to Berkeley’s efforts to shut down conservative speakers. A fierce debate about free speech on campus ignited in February when the university canceled an appearance by former Breitbart editor Yiannopoulos because of security concerns. Steve Bannon, former adviser to President Trump, and conservative commentator Ann Coulter were reportedly scheduled to speak at this weekend’s event, but their appearances were never confirmed. Coulter had also been scheduled to appear at Berkeley in April, but her speech was abruptly canceled and protests followed. The confusion around whether Bannon and Coulter would appear is “part of the whole chaos” in the runup to the Berkeley event, said John Sepulvado, host of KQED’s The California Report. “It is part of the M.O. of these activities … to be as confusing and disorienting as possible,” Sepulvado told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson earlier this week. Since Yiannopoulos’ appearance was canceled earlier this year, students and right-wing groups have criticized Berkeley widely considered to be one of the centers of the free speech movement in the 1960s for shutting down conservative speech. Berkeley officials say the school is committed to preserving free speech but at the same time must protect safety on campus. Yiannopoulos posted a YouTube video this week saying the university is using “slippery and bureaucratic tactics” to try to prevent the event from happening. The university did not try to cancel the event outright, as Yiannopoulos suggests, but a group of about 130 professors, graduate students and lecturers called for a boycott of classes and university events next week. An open letter argued that many students, faculty and staff would feel unsafe at school because of the anti-immigrant, anti-female, anti-gay rhetoric of many of the speakers. They also expressed fears that there might be an “uncontrollable confrontation” during the week. What about the legality of such rhetoric? Hate speech is protected under the First Amendment, in part because there isn’t a legal definition of it, says Santa Clara University law professor Margaret Russell. A person can only be prosecuted for a specific crime associated with the hate speech but not the speech on its own, she explains. “I think the law is pretty clear, at least to the extent that hate speech is not considered, by itself, to be unprotected under the First Amendment,” Russell told Hobson in February. “So, if people want to enact laws or if people want to prosecute people who violate the law, the prosecution can’t be based on the viewpoint of the person. It has to be based on the underlying crime.” The free speech debate has grown more contentious in light of the growing number of nationwide protests since Trump took office. In August, a woman was killed after a group of white supremacists and neo-Nazis at a “Unite the Right” rally violently clashed with counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va. Sepulvado of KQED says it’s no coincidence the far-right is using Berkeley one of the most liberal cities in the U.S. as the center of this debate. “It’s become a center of far-right speech because the far-right has taken the tactic and Milo Yiannopoulos being the prime example of essentially trolling people who wouldn’t want to hear it and that’s what this is,” Sepulvado said. “When I talked to Berkeley Patriot, and I said, you know, ‘What is the academic value of having Ann Coulter or Milo Yiannopoulos speak on campus?’ They say there isn’t any. They are the first to acknowledge that there is no academic value.”

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December 5, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos Resigns From Breitbart After … – NPR

Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a news conference Tuesday in which he announced his resignation as a senior editor with Breitbart News. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a news conference Tuesday in which he announced his resignation as a senior editor with Breitbart News. Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos has resigned amid a social media backlash over comments he made that appeared to condone pedophilia. In a news conference Tuesday, Yiannopoulos said his resignation was effective immediately and praised the website as “a significant factor in my success.” He also explained his views on sex with minors, insisting that he does not condone statutory rape. “I do not believe any change in the legal age of consent is justifiable or desirable,” Yiannopoulos said. He was referring to comments in live-streamed interviews more than a year ago in which he said, “We get hung up on this kind of child abuse stuff,” and referenced, “this arbitrary and oppressive idea of consent.” “I said some things on those Internet live streams that were simply wrong,” he said Tuesday. He also said that he had been sexually abused as a child. Yiannopoulos’ resignation comes one day after he lost both a prominent speaking gig at a conservative meeting and a book deal. As The Two Way reported: “First, Monday afternoon the American Conservative Union rescinded its invitation to the right-wing provocateur noted for his political posts on the Internet to speak at its annual Conservative Political Action Conference this upcoming weekend. Then, a few hours later, Simon & Schuster announced that it was canceling the publication of Yiannopoulos’ upcoming book, Dangerous. “These actions come in the wake of a social media backlash against Yiannopoulos after the conservative news outlet The Reagan Battalion tweeted videos on Sunday in which Yiannopoulos appears to condone statutory rape and sexual relationships between boys and men.” Yiannopoulos had tried to clarify his comments Monday on Facebook, defending his remarks and referencing his own sexual history while also blaming his own “sloppy phrasing” and “deceptive” video editing. He said Tuesday that other publishers had expressed interest in his book, and that he expected it to be published this year. He also said he was founding an “independently funded media venture” and would be going on a “live tour in the coming weeks,” including appearances on college campuses. Earlier this month, a Yiannopoulos speaking engagement at the University of California, Berkeley was canceled after students protests turned violent.

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December 1, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO – YouTube

Shame they cut it short! MILO’s tour comes to Australia soon. For tickets, visit: https://www.MILOlive.com.au MILO’s tour, TROLL ACADEMY, begins in the fall. For tickets, visit: http://trollacademy.org/ DANGEROUS: The Audiobook available now on Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/y75s2p84 MILO’s book DANGEROUS, published by Dangerous Books, available now at https://DANGEROUS.com INFO: https://MILO-inc.comBLOG: https://MILO.yiannopoulos.netBUY MERCH: https://MILOboutique.comLIKE: https://www.facebook.com/my… Show less

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

The Milo Yiannopoulos shtick shows the disconnect between …

For many, the lasting image of Milo Yiannopoulos in his fizzled Free Speech Week appearance on the UC Berkeley campus will be of the selfie he took as he was surrounded by a small throng of admirers and journalists. For me, however, it will be the vast, empty space of Sproul Plaza, barricaded by orange Jersey barriers, moments after Yiannopoulos left. On the very spot in 1964 where Mario Savio, surrounded by thousands, famously commandeered the roof of a police car to demand that students be allowed to express their political opinions, there was nothing and nobody, a potent metaphor for a ginned-up Free Speech Week starring the puerile Yiannopoulos. (How puerile is he? One of the signs he held high on Sunday said, Feminism is cancer.) Courtesy of UC Berkeley This is what free speech looks like: Mario Savio on top of police car on Sproul Plaza on Oct 1. 1964 This is what free speech looks like: Mario Savio on top of police car on Sproul Plaza on Oct 1. 1964 (Courtesy of UC Berkeley) You could say Free Speech Week backfired; after all, none of the high-profile speakers (Stephen K. Bannon, Ann Coulter) touted by Yiannopoulos turned up, none of the proper permits were secured by the tiny student group that sponsored him, nor any of the required fees paid. Sure, Yiannopoulos still came on campus after all, speakers cannot be barred from the public square but he would have no microphone, no bullhorn and really, not much of an audience because few people were able to get past the single security checkpoint by the time he arrived on campus just after noon. For Yiannopoulous, though, it was a ringing success. He not only highlighted the hypocrisy of students who give lip service to free speech while trying to curtail it, but got a spectacular amount of publicity to boot. The most expensive photo op in UC Berkeley history, declared the university spokesman, who estimated that about $800,000 was spent on security for the stunt. Law enforcement officers had come from all over the state; a handful of sheriffs deputies came from Kings County, five police officers came from Taft, four from Corcoran. Your tax dollars at work, all in service of a self-regarding chaos agent who has become frightfully adept at exploiting the intellectual weak spots of left-leaning college students and, sadly, too many of their professors. Once again, a circus clown of the far right, whose rich benefactors have a stake in keeping the culture wars alive, had conceived and executed a plan to back the university and its overwhelmingly liberal community into a corner over the issue of speech. University administrators and hundreds of police officers behaved magnificently. I wish I could say the same for everyone else. :: At a moment when President Trump has told black professional athletes to shut up about their politics, called them vulgar names and urged team owners to fire players for expressing themselves in peaceful and powerful ways, its hard to overstate the irony of conservatives coming to Berkeley to give lectures about free speech. And yet, Berkeley needs the lesson. There is a distressing disconnect here between respect for the concept of free speech and respect for its exercise. On Sunday, I observed several discussions between Cal students and practiced right-wing provocateurs who had come to campus to support Yiannopoulos and, if possible, increase their internet profiles. Some conversations were rational; most devolved into shouting matches. Ben Bergquam, who runs an obscure Facebook page called Frontline Radio, was egging on black and Latina students, insisting the phrase La Raza is inherently racist, and insisting bizarrely that most people who call themselves African Americans have never been to Africa. (Not sure what his point was, but as soon as he said it, Viana Maria Roland, a black woman with long braids, stopped him in his tracks when she replied, I have been to Africa four times.) Millie Weaver, a Valkyrie-braided agitator from InfoWars, the website of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones (who has promulgated disgusting misinformation about the murders of first-graders in Newtown, and spread hallucinatory rumors about Hillary Clinton and a Washington pizza parlor), argued with Camila Elizabet Aguirre Aguilar about structural racism and reparations. A very frustrated Aguirre Aguilar eventually told Weaver to shut up I could not totally blame her thus giving Weaver the sound bite of which she had undoubtedly dreamed. I guess I came here to vent a little bit, Im not gonna lie, Aguirre Aguilar told me afterward. Im angry about everything thats going on. Free speech once sought to legitimize the oppressed, and now it has been appropriated to legitimize oppression. The right to free speech is different from the right to having a platform. I appreciate her sincerity, and her willingness to show up to debate. But that sentiment, which I have heard many times from Berkeley students, gives me chills. Free speech is meaningless without a platform. Students at the nations foremost public university should not just understand that concept, but embrace it. :: How is it that the cradle of campus free speech has become a place where disagreeable speech must be drowned out or driven away? I shuddered last week when I heard a Cal associate French professor tell KPCCs Larry Mantle that she was taking her students off campus for classes this week, for their safety. Good lord, why not teach them the immortal words of Eleanor Roosevelt: No one can make you feel inferior without your consent? Or even remind them of the childhood aphorism, Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me? How did skin here get so thin? The new chancellor of Cal, Carol T. Christ, recently offered the most cogent explanation that I have heard.

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos coordinated work with neo-Nazis: report …

Former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos coordinated some of his work with neo-Nazis that he publicly distanced himself from, according to a report. British-born Yiannopoulos has said he is a fellow traveler of the alt-right a group of far-right supporters who include white nationalists and neo-Nazis while shying away from backing its most extremist elements. But emails revealed in a Buzzfeed report Thursday show that the 32-year-old reached out to and received input on his work from prominent hateful figures. For an explanation on the alt right last year, Yiannopoulos is reported to have received help and editing from neo-Nazi website Daily Stormers Andrew Auernheimer, feudalist Curtis Yarvin and white nationalist Devin Saucier. Berkeley cancels ‘Free Speech Week’ Other details in the Buzzfeed piece, which chronicles Yiannopouloss relationships to other Breibart figures such as former White House strategist Steve Bannon and the billionaire Mercer family, include that his passwords appear to be based off of the Nazi violence of Kristallnacht and the Night of the Long Knives purge. A video published with the report shows him singing America the Beautiful at karaoke while some in a crowd that includes white supremacist Richard Spencer give Nazi salutes. Breitbart has threatened legal action against those who say Yiannopoulos is racist, and the internet personality himself told Buzzfeed everyone who knows me also knows I’m not a racist. He said that he is of Jewish ancestry and supports Jews but finds humor in breaking taboos and laughing at things that people tell me are forbidden to joke about. Milo Yiannopoulos claims Hurricane Irma destroyed his Miami home Yiannopoulos also said he was joking when he appeared to condone pedophilia in a podcast interview last year, a clip of which ultimately lead to his resignation from Breitbart. The departure occurred while Bannon, who is seen coaching Yiannopoulos on media appearances and article angles in some emails, had left Breitbart to work for Trump, which lasted until August. Yiannopoulos is now working on his own media brand, MILO Inc., which Buzzfeed and Playboy last month reported is funded by the Breitbart-backing Mercer family, a major Trump donor.

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos Is Starting a New, Ugly, For-Profit Troll …

Milo Yiannopoulos, the former tech editor at Breitbart, has made political provocations, often deeply offensive ones, a business model. But his career seemed to come crashing down in recent months when one of his speaking appearances, at the University of California, Berkeley, led to riots. Weeks later, videos emerged of Yiannopoulos seeming to condone pedophilia. (I do not support pedophilia. Period. It is a vile and disgusting crime, perhaps the very worst, Yiannopoulos said in a statement on Facebook at the time.) Yet his allies turned on him. Yiannopoulos was subsequently forced out of Breitbart in disgrace. The American Conservative Union disinvited him from CPAC, and Simon & Schuster canceled a six-figure book deal. But as the free-speech conflagration he ignited at Berkeley continues to burn, Yiannopoulos is planning a way back in. Days after releasing a video touting his return to the campus, Yiannopoulos told the Hive that he would be launching a new media venture in the coming weeks with what he says is a $12 million investment from backers whose identities he is protecting. (Yiannopoulos showed me a page from the contract with the investors’ names blacked out.) Another person involved with the company, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, was similarly secretive: “Milo has the best instincts about these things,” he said. The business, which will be called Milo Inc., will be even more focused on stoking the sort of ugly political conflict that’s closer to the surface than ever in these early months of the Trump administration. As Fox News remains busy with its latest scandal, Milo Inc. promises to be the latest incumbent in a growing far-right media sphere that is overwhelmingly populated with politically incorrect, and often jarring, provocations once considered verboten by conservatives. Yiannopolos will compete not only against sites such as TheBlaze and Alex Jones’s Infowars but also against his very own former employer, Breitbart, which has become a formidable force in the space after its former chairman, Steve Bannon, helped usher Trump to victory and later joined his administration. Yiannopoulos, for his part, is relying on a formula that he employed at Breitbart. He said that Milo Inc. would be dedicated to making the lives of journalists, professors, politicians, feminists, Black Lives Matter activists, and other professional victims a living hell. Milo Inc., according to a press release, will be based in Miami, with a planned staff of 30. It will be in the business of what can be best described as corporatized trolling via live entertainment, with Yiannopoulos and his investors hosting events featuring right-wing talent. The business of Madonna became touring, said Yiannopoulos in a phone interview, citing the artists deal with Live Nation. Im doing the same thing, but instead of signing up with Live Nation, Im building one. Im building it for libertarian and conservative comedians, writers, stand-up comics, intellectuals, you name it. Milo Inc.’s first event will be a return to the town that erupted in riots when he was invited to speak earlier this year. In fact, Yiannopoulos said that he is planning a week-long celebration of free speech near U.C. Berkeley, where a speech by his fellow campus agitator, Ann Coulter, was recently canceled after threats of violence. It will culminate in his bestowing something called the Mario Savio Award for Free Speech. (The son of Savio, one of the leaders of Berkeley’s Free Speech movement during the mid-1960s, called the award some kind of sick joke.) Initially, Yiannopolos will be the company’s main talent. Im the proof of concept, he said, but added that he hoped to eventually expand the company. The thing about me is that I have access to a talent pipeline that no one else even knows about. All the funniest, smartest, most interesting young YouTubers and all the rest of them who hate feminism, who hate political correctness. This generation thats coming up, its about 13, 14, 15, now have very different politics than most other generations. They love us. They love me, and Im going to be actively hunting around for the next Milo.

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October 19, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

The fall of Milo Yiannopoulos, explained – Vox

Milo Yiannopoulos finally went too far for conservatives. On Monday, he lost his book deal, and his speech at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) was canceled. And on Tuesday, he resigned from the ultra-conservative website Breitbart. But it wasnt his racism, sexism, transphobia, or other kinds of bigotry that led to Yiannopouloss fall. Nope. After all that, its comments apparently supporting child molestation that did Yiannopoulos in. Heres the backstory: Over the weekend, it was revealed that Yiannopoulos was invited to give a speech at CPAC, the biggest mainstream conservative conference in America. That sparked a lot of outrage particularly among the left, which pointed out that Yiannopoulos has a long history of making all sorts of bigoted comments. But liberal outrage wasnt what got CPAC to pull the plug or Yiannopoulos to resign from Breitbart. Instead, the final straw was a video resurfaced by the conservative website Reagan Battalion in which Yiannopoulos defended the idea of 13 year olds having sex with older men, referencing his own story that he benefited from a priest molesting him when he was a teenager. In the homosexual world, particularly, some of those relationships between younger boys and older men the sort of coming of age relationships the relationships in which those older men help those young boys to discover who they are and give them security and safety and provide them with love and a reliable sort of rock, Yiannopoulos said. That, apparently, was the tipping point for CPAC. In a statement, CPAC organizers said they originally invited Yiannopoulos, whose speaking event at a college campus had to be canceled because it literally caused riots, to stand up for free speech but that Yiannopouloss comments on child molestation went too far. Due to the revelation of an offensive video in the past 24 hours condoning pedophilia, the American Conservative Union has decided to rescind the invitation of Milo Yiannopoulos to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference, American Conservative Union Chair Matt Schlapp said in a statement. Yiannopoulos has since apologized. In a Facebook post, he clarified that he doesnt believe pedophilia and child molestation are okay: I would like to restate my utter disgust at adults who sexually abuse minors. I am horrified by pedophilia and I have devoted large portions of my career as a journalist to exposing child abusers. As for his actual remarks, he explained, As to some of the specific claims being made, sometimes things tumble out of your mouth on these long, late-night live-streams, when everyone is spit-balling, that are incompletely expressed or not what you intended. Nonetheless, I’ve reviewed the tapes that appeared last night in their proper full context and I don’t believe they say what is being reported. (Who among us hasnt accidentally defended child molestation on a late-night live stream?) But the apology didnt stop the enormous backlash. Later in the afternoon, Simon & Schuster and Threshold Editions announced that they have canceled their book deal with Yiannopoulos. And under apparent pressure from Breitbart staff who demanded Yiannopouloss resignation, he quit on Tuesday. For many people, the whole controversy has raised more questions than answers. Why was it that it took something as low and awful as support for child molestation to finally get conservatives to disown Yiannopoulos? What about all the bigotry he has pushed in the past? Why were those other remarks not enough? Whats remarkable about this whole affair is how unsurprising it is. The video that the Reagan Battalion resurfaced has been around since July 2016. And Yiannopoulos has a long history of making offensive, provocative remarks; its what hes known for. It was totally predictable that a mainstream conservative groups attempt to reach out to someone whos basically an internet troll would blow up in some way yet the fact CPAC and other conservatives even felt compelled to reach out to someone like Yiannopoulos says a lot about conservatism today. As journalist Nicole Hemmer explained, none of this should be surprising to anyone: As someone whos been on this beat for a while: everything youre learning about Milo has been public for ages. CPAC made its choice. Yiannopoulos, after all, has a long history of offensive remarks. Here are a few examples: This is who Yiannopoulos is: As my colleague Zack Beauchamp explained, his entire shtick is to say something inflammatory, anger a whole lot of people, get widespread media attention, refuse to back down, and say he did it all to stand up for free speech because no one can control what he says. Yiannopoulos pushes the boundaries just enough to force this chain of events, which conveniently prop him up as a hero. But Yiannopouloss child molestation remarks crossed the line. For one, condoning child molestation goes too far for just about everyone, regardless of political party. But the remarks also may have crossed the line because they played into longstanding conservative fears about gay men specifically, the myth that theres a link between homosexuality and pedophilia. The Family Research Council, a conservative anti-LGBTQ group, still promotes this myth on its website. And it was used in the past to demonize gay men and block the advancement of gay rights such as, retired UC Davis professor Gregory Herek explained, in 1977, when Anita Bryant campaigned successfully to repeal a Dade County (FL) ordinance prohibiting anti-gay discrimination, she named her organization Save Our Children, and warned that a particularly deviant-minded [gay] teacher could sexually molest children. (The empirical research shows there is no scientific basis to this myth.) In this context, Yiannopouloss support of child molestation as a gay man played into preexisting conservative fears about homosexuality, making him a particularly alarming figure. That, coupled with societys total rejection of pedophilia, may have contributed to Yiannopouloss fall leading not just to a lost book deal and canceled speech, but to him quitting from Breitbart, the media outlet where he made so many of his past offensive remarks. In the past, Yiannopoulos has explained away his offensive remarks by arguing that hes simply standing up for free speech. This was the tack he took when he appeared on Bill Mahers show over the weekend. All I care about is free speech and free expression, he said. I want people to be able to be, do, and say anything. To this end, he points to college campuses as evidence of liberal political correctness running amok in a way thats stifled free speech. He can claim some personal experience here, like the time anti-fascists rioted at UC Berkeley when he was scheduled to give a speech there and forced him to cancel his event. But this is part of a broader conservative talking point about trigger warnings, safe spaces, and other examples of left-leaning students on college campuses doing things that, according to critics, stifle free speech. This isnt something thats exclusive to conservatives. Maher, who identifies as liberal, appeared to invite Yiannopoulos to his show at least in part because he agrees that liberals are too sensitive to speech that they disagree with. You make liberals crazy for that part of liberalism that has gone off the deep end, Maher told Yiannopoulos. But other liberals have argued that this supposed defense of free speech is really just a ruse to say all sorts of racist, sexist, and bigoted things. ThinkProgress editor Judd Legum pointed out, for example, that despite CPACs claim that it invited Yiannopoulos to defend his free speech rights, they disinvited him when his speech went too far for them. The racism, sexism, and other offensive remarks were apparently fine, but it was the support for child molestation that apparently crossed a line. After all, CPAC knew of Yiannopouloss past offensive remarks. Its one of the reasons people rioted in Berkeley, decried Yiannopouloss invitation to Mahers show, and told CPAC not to invite Yiannopoulos in the first place. Yet CPAC invited him, publishers signed book deals with him, and Breitbart employed him anyway at least until his pro-pedophilia comments surfaced. The entire debacle, however, shows a broader issue: Modern conservatism has a huge problem with bigotry in its ranks. Consider Donald Trump. He called Mexican immigrants rapists who are bringing crime and bringing drugs to the US during his campaign launch event. He proposed banning Muslims, an entire religious group, from entering the US. He argued that a federal judge overseeing the Trump University lawsuit should be disqualified because of his Mexican heritage. And at campaign events and as president, he has spoken of black people through coded language that suggests all black people live in jobless, crime-ridden inner cities and all may even work for the Congressional Black Caucus. Whats more, racism and xenophobia appeared to predict support for Trump. One telling study, conducted by researchers at UC Santa Barbara and Stanford shortly before the election, found that if people who strongly identified as white were told that nonwhite groups will outnumber white people in 2042, they became more likely to support Trump suggesting theres a significant racial element to his support. And this doesnt even get into the other offensive remarks Trump has made, including about sexual assault like when he said he can grab women by the genitals and get away with it because hes a celebrity. Yet Trump won the Republican primary and, ultimately, the 2016 general election. Hes not only continued to get the backing of the Republican Party but is also scheduled to talk at CPAC this week. Or consider Yiannopouloss resignation from Breitbart one of the most read news outlets on the right, based on online traffic numbers. Breitbart is a news outlet that has run all sorts of explicitly racist, sexist, and bigoted articles. That was, apparently, fine under the websites editorial standards. But once Yiannopouloss pro-pedophilia remarks surfaced, only then did he apparently go too far for Breitbart. Some conservatives have looked at all of this in shock and horror. Conservative pundit Glenn Beck, for one, has become a top critic on the right of the Trump administration. In one instance, after Trump appointed former Breitbart head and alt-right champion Steve Bannon in November as his chief strategist, Beck suggested that Americans are racist if they let Trump keep Bannon in charge. When people really understand what the alt-right is, this neo-nationalist, neo-Nazi, white supremacy idea that Bannon is pushing hard, Beck said, I hope they wake up because, if not, we are racist. If thats what we accept and we know it, then we are racist. I contend people dont know what the alt-right is yet. But Beck seems to represent a minority on the right, given Trumps ascendance to the White House and his continued support from Republicans. Conservatives apathy to such racism, misogyny, and other offensive remarks is how CPAC and other conservatives could overlook Yiannopouloss racism, sexism, and other kinds of bigotry when they touted him as a free speech champion only to consider his child molestation comments beyond the boundaries of accepted free speech.

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October 17, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Reports: Trump ‘Embarrassed and Pissed’ by Strange Endorsement Mistake, ‘Especially Upset’ at Bannon’s Role in Moore Victory

White House sources claim President Donald Trump is “embarrassed” over the outcome of Tuesday’s Alabama U.S. Senate election and understands he made a mistake in endorsing Luther Strange over Judge Roy Moore.

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September 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Ann Coulter: When Life Gives You Paul Ryan, Make Lemonade

It is now clear that Republicans are incapable of giving us a free market in health insurance, so it continues to be illegal in America to buy health plans that don’t cover shrinks, domestic violence counseling, and HIV screening, and perhaps always shall be.

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September 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed


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