Archive for the ‘Milo Yiannopoulos’ Category

Milo Yiannopoulos delays memoir to add details of protests against it – The Guardian

Controversy continues Milo Yiannopoulos speaking at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Photograph: Jeremy Papasso/AP

Publication of rightwing controversialist Milo Yiannopouloss memoir Dangerous has been delayed until June, so that he can include details of the controversy surrounding his book deal and the recent student protests that resulted in cancelled speaking events.

In a statement, Yiannopoulos said he had asked his publisher to postpone the launch, originally scheduled for March, to enable him to write about the craziness and rioting at three sites in the US: the Berkeley and Davis campuses at the University of California, and the Seattle campus at the University of Washington.

It would be absurd for me to publish a book without some discussion of the insanity of the last few weeks, said the far-right provocateur, who is technology editor of Breitbart News. Breitbarts former executive chair, Steve Bannon, is now President Trumps chief strategist.

Yiannopouloss speaking tour at university campuses has been dogged by protests and violent clashes between his supporters, police and protesters.

The book was due to be published on 14 March by Threshold Editions, an imprint of Simon & Schuster (S&S) that specialises in rightwing writing. It is now set to appear on 13 June.

Dangerous has proved a major headache for the publishing house after it paid Yiannopoulos a reported $250,000 (203,000) advance. Though the writer had claimed the deal was cooked up over lunch with the publisher, it has since emerged that it had been shopped around other New York publishing houses, who had not found it commercial enough to warrant a substantial offer. A vociferous backlash followed his signing, with authors, critics and booksellers voicing concern about his involvement in far-right politics and alleged trolling of opponents through social media. The British-born writer was permanently banned from Twitter in 2016, after claims he had incited followers to send abusive messages to the Ghostbusters actor Leslie Jones. He has also likened feminism to cancer and attacked transgender people as retarded.

Dismissing him as a clickbait grifter who has made a name for himself spewing hate speech, Adam Morgan, editor of the Chicago Review of Books, said his publication would not review any books published by S&S in protest at the deal.

Last month, in what was widely seen as a damage-limitation exercise, S&S president and CEO Carolyn Reidy wrote to authors to reassure them that Yiannopouloss book would not contain hate speech. Instead, it would be a substantive examination of the issues surrounding political correctness and free speech, she wrote. Despite this, essayist and feminist author Roxane Gay announced that she would withdraw her forthcoming book from S&S because of the Yiannopoulos deal.

It is not the first book mooted by the journalist, who remains an influential figure in the so-called alt-right movement. In 2014, Yiannopoulos claimed he was writing a book about Gamergate, and in 2015, a book called The Sociopaths of Silicon Valley. Neither book appeared.

He has also found it hard to find a publisher in the UK, after S&Ss British subsidiary walked away from a deal. Insiders in the big four publishing houses said he was not well known in the UK and doubted the book could work without a significant promotional platform.

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Milo Yiannopoulos delays memoir to add details of protests against it – The Guardian

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How trolls like Milo Yiannopoulos monetize your hate, and what to do about it – Boing Boing

This week’s edition of the always, always-excellent On the Media podcast featured an interview (MP3) with notorious (and self-confessed) media manipulator Ryan Holiday, whose book, Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator describes his career in PR, in which he perfected the art of making terrible people rich by getting decent people to hate them.

At the core of Holiday’s theory is the idea that young men with disposable income will do anything so long as someone tells them that they’re forbidden to do so. He did this very successfully for Tucker Max, the “pick up artist” guru who provided advice to men on tricking or coercing women into having sex with them. Holiday describes how he defaced his client’s own ads, tipped off activist groups to upcoming appearances in order to gin up controversy and ensure noisy demonstrations, and worked to encourage city bus companies to yank his clients’ ads and activists to create petitions to cancel Max’s speaking appearances.

He likens this to the Milo Yiannopoulos playbook, saying that Yiannopoulos identifies the people who will hate him who have the biggest public followings, then works to specifically offend those people so that they tell other people not to listen to him. Though most people will take the critics’ advice, there is a large, widely distributed group of young men who will also encounter the message, decide that no one will tell them what to think, and thus become unquestioning Yiannopoulos brownshirts.

In an accompanying article in The Observer, Holiday described the tactic in detail, then offers a countermeasure: show up, listen respectfully, then devastate them from the floor with counterarguments. Don’t let them be the underdog darlings of reactionary manbabies.

If you actually want to fight back against these trolls, heres a strategy to consider: Organize all you want, get as many people as you can to show up at their events, but dont try to shut them down. In fact, the only thing you should try to shut down are the instigators who try to incite violence. Regain the moral high ground by saying that you absolutely respect their right to free speech.

And then, actually listen and talk to them. To me, the most effective retorts against the alt-right were when Trevor Noah had Tomi Lahren on his show and when Elle Reeve profiled Richard Spencer for Vice. Both came off looking mostly like jokes. Tomi Lahren showed her age. Richard Spencer revealed his movement to be mostly a collection of a few thousand sad dorks. Wales Twitter exchange with Tomi was effective toothere was no outrage, no opposition, just teasing.

They say sunlight is the best disinfectant. But it is also what allows you to see whether the emperor has any clothes. And its this sad, and often pathetic reality, that the collective hysteria has beneficently covered up in those its trying to fight. What should be seen as farce somehow looks like real fascism.

How To Counter Milo’s Trolling Playbook [On the Media]

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How trolls like Milo Yiannopoulos monetize your hate, and what to do about it – Boing Boing

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What shut down Milo Yiannopoulos? – Socialist Worker Online

DEREK WRIGHT (“Making sense of what happened at Berkeley”) and Mukund Rathi (“Thousands confront the right at UC Berkeley”) are too quick to dismiss the Black Bloc’s role in shutting down Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California-Berkeley. They are right that smashing windows off campus served no useful purpose, but on dubious ground when they imply (or state, in Derek’s case) that the white nationalist event would have been shut down without the Bloc’s intervention.

It’s impossible to say with certainty, but I saw a handful of event attendees or organizers slip through the crowd prior to the Bloc’s entrance, and from my vantage point, it seems unlikely that a simple blockade would have worked without either more numbers or better organization.

In any case, it seems clear that the Bloc’s attack on the student center was, as things actually played out, one of the reasons that university police made the decision to call off the event–a decision which was a blow to the far right and a morale boost for our side. This remains a victory even if the means of winning it left the majority of protesters playing a more passive role than we might desire.

SocialistWorker.org welcomes our readers’ contributions to discussion and debate about articles we’ve published and questions facing the left. Opinions expressed in these contributions don’t necessarily reflect those of SW.

The reason this matters is not that the general arguments Mukund and Derek make against the Black Bloc are wrong. The Bloc, at least in its U.S. incarnation, has not been a tactic either aimed at or useful in building the mass movement we desperately need.

The reason is simply that accurately describing the pros and cons of different tactics is necessary to formulating a strategy for the new political period inaugurated along with Trump. Street-fighting tactics have helped the left at various periods of history, and even if we don’t think that will be true in the next months and years, we should base our assessment on present reality.

We should also avoid speculating without real evidence that protesters might be undercover cops. This is unnecessarily divisive in an argument about tactics and strategy, and sowing suspicions of infiltration has itself at times been used as a repressive tactic by the state. David Judd, Oakland, California

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What shut down Milo Yiannopoulos? – Socialist Worker Online

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New York Post Smears MILO as ‘Alt-Right Extremist’

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The New York Post smeared Breitbart Senior Editor MILO as an “alt-right extremist” in a recent article mentioning the Dangerous Faggot, despite the fact that MILO has repeatedly dismissed the label.

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New York Post Smears MILO as ‘Alt-Right Extremist’

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OUT Magazine’s Chadwick Moore Comes Out as Conservative, Cites Backlash from Left Following MILO Profile

LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 13: A defiant fist is raised at a vigil for the worst mass shooing in United States history on June 13, 2016 in Los Angeles, United States. A gunman killed 49 people and wounded 53 others at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida early yesterday morning before suspect Omar Mateen also died on-scene. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Chadwick Moore, a contributor for the LGBT magazine OUT, has come out as a conservative in an article for The New York Post, citing his gradual move to the right after left-wing friends ousted and rejected him for his neutral profile on Breitbart Senior Editor MILO.

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OUT Magazine’s Chadwick Moore Comes Out as Conservative, Cites Backlash from Left Following MILO Profile

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It looks like Milo Yiannopoulos is working out of the Tucker Max playbook – A.V. Club

See all latest (Photo: Getty Images, Drew Angerer) (Photo: Getty Images, Drew Angerer)

If something about the series of events that turned Milo Yiannopoulos from a sexist Twitter creep into a sexist Twitter creep with a book deal seems familiar, it could be because we all experienced something similar before with the meteoric rise (and painful fall) of proto-bro Tucker Max. Back in 2009, Max was a blogger trying to promote his I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell movie with a very limited budget, so a marketing whiz named Ryan Holiday came up with a crazy scheme to convince young dudes to see a movie: try to stop them from seeing it.

Holiday is now editor-at-large for the Observer, and hes written an extensive piece about how his Tucker Max strategy has been adopted by Yiannopoulos, his supporters, and other racist/sexist/alt-right assholes who are trying to spread hate and incite fear. As Holiday explains, they promoted Maxs movie (and his book of the same name) by buying cheap ads that they would call people to complain about, by submitting fake tips about Tucker Max-related controversies to Gawker, and by vandalizing their own billboards to make Tucker Max seem dangerous, subversive, andmost of allsuper cool. Holiday is now seeing these same strategies being used to promote Yiannopoulos, and he wants people to recognize how easily they can play right into the hands of these jerks.

Holiday says the trick isnt to try to take away Yiannopoulos platform by protesting his campus talks or whatever, because that will just give his supporters something to rally against. Instead, he suggests actually listening to people like Yiannopoulos and giving them a chance to speak, because then the public will have a chance to hear their awful, hateful ideas and theyllhopefullyrecognize them as being awful and hateful. Holiday says the sales of Tuckers books disappeared when the controversy and outrage surrounding him ran its course, so he believes that Yiannopoulos and Nazis like Richard Spencer will eventually get bored or tire themselves out if everyone stops feeding their marketing machines.

The argument here is fairly optimistic, suggesting that taking the high ground will always work out in the long run. But Holiday also seems to believe that all press is good press. These days, when social media has given everyone in the world the ability to tell someone that their ideas are bad and that they should feel bad, its important to not dismiss the power of simply laughing at someone in the face for being an attention-seeking loserwhich Yiannopoulos certainly is. After all, even Donald Trump is starting to crack under the pressure of his unpopularity, so maybe the trick to getting rid of Yiannopoulos is constantly making fun of him on TV for several months.

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It looks like Milo Yiannopoulos is working out of the Tucker Max playbook – A.V. Club

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Tucker Carlson Faces Off With Guest Who Calls Milo Yiannopoulos a Fascist – Mediaite

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Tucker Carlson tonight faced off with Yvette Felarca, who was at Berkeley protesting Milo Yiannopoulos (where protests quickly turned into riots), who she considers to be a fascist.

She said that Yiannopoulos is trying to whip up a lynch mob of people that then goes out and attacks women, immigrants, minorities, and others. And she doesnt believe he should be allowed to speak and recruit others to that cause.

Carlson pointed to the whole free speech issue here and asked her exactly what she wants to see happen to Yiannopoulos if she considers him to be a dangerous fascist. He repeatedly pressed this issue as Felarca argued that people have a right to defend themselves when unsafe environments are being created for a lot of people.

Watch the whole segment above, via Fox News.

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Tucker Carlson Faces Off With Guest Who Calls Milo Yiannopoulos a Fascist – Mediaite

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Catherine Rampell: What Milo Yiannopoulos and Elizabeth Warren have in common – Billings Gazette

What’s the best way to make sure a message gets heard? Try to muzzle it.

Both liberals and conservatives are newly rediscovering the political power of this phenomenon, known as the Streisand Effect.

The term refers to what happens when an attempt to censor information backfires and instead unintentionally draws more attention to the censorship target. Its namesake is Barbra Streisand, who in 2003 sued a photographer for including a photograph of her Malibu home among a series of 12,000 aerial images documenting California coastal erosion. Thanks to the lawsuit, which was unsuccessful, this previously little-seen photo soon received enormous publicity and hundreds of thousands of views.

Plenty of other celebrities, companies and government agencies have come to rue the times they inadvertently publicized things they were trying to smother. Meanwhile, provocateurs and activists have learned how to weaponize the Streisand Effect, using censorship attempts to amplify their own voices.

After all, suppression of speech not only generates more public interest, as bystanders scramble to learn what all the fuss is about; it can also win the speaker sympathy and the moral high ground.

So far this month, there have been two major and, in different ways, instructive examples of political speech being amplified by censorship.

On Feb. 7, during Senate debate over the confirmation of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., as attorney general, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., began reading a 1986 letter from civil rights icon Coretta Scott King. King had opposed Sessions’s nomination to a federal judgeship, on grounds that he had used his position as a federal prosecutor to suppress black votes.

As she read King’s letter, Warren was stopped, scolded and formally silenced by Republican senators. These senatorial snowflakes, it seems, were more interested in silencing speech they disliked than rebutting it. The primary consequences were to energize the left and make King’s once-obscure letter go viral.

Warren has not indicated that she was trying to goad her colleagues into silencing her. But she could have hardly conceived of a better way to magnify her message, or her own stature.

“She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted,” Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., declared, in phrasing that seems perfectly scripted for a 2020 presidential campaign ad.

A week earlier, on the opposite coast, a completely different kind of character from the other side of the political spectrum appeared to leverage the Streisand Effect for less noble purposes.

Milo Yiannopoulos, Breitbart writer and sleazy professional troll, has built a career out of stoking Pavlovian outrage and censorship attempts from the left in order to build his audience on the right. He has mocked Jews, Muslims, African Americans, feminists, people who are overweight and the LGBT community (though he himself is gay), among others.

Clearly, the goal is to bait his intellectual opponents (not all of whom are liberal, mind you) into trying to forcibly silence him.

Sometimes you’re not trying to score. Sometimes you’re just trying to draw a foul.

Sure enough, Yiannopoulos’s opponents happily oblige, with heckles, threats and sometimes even violence such as the riots that erupted at the University of California at Berkeley this month, which led to the cancellation of his talk and his evacuation from campus.

The riots didn’t silence Yiannopoulos, however; instead, the resulting coverage megaphoned his ugly message to a much broader audience and will help him sell more books, schedule more lucrative speaking gigs and receive more sympathetic tweets from our sitting president. (President Trump, under the guidance of former Breitbart publisher Stephen K. Bannon, has also proved especially adept at alchemizing liberal indignation into self-aggrandizing news coverage.)

There are many compelling arguments for why protecting free speech, including speech you disagree with or even abhor, is important. It’s enshrined in our Constitution; it is among the sacred liberal values we promote throughout the world; free and open dialogue helps advance scientific inquiry; and so on.

But one underappreciated argument is self-interest. Forcibly silencing and thereby martyring your opponents rather than employing counter-speech to expose them as wrong or, better yet, ridiculous may be exactly what they want you to do.

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Catherine Rampell: What Milo Yiannopoulos and Elizabeth Warren have in common – Billings Gazette

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Writer who profiled Milo Yiannopoulos says backlash turned him conservative – LGBTQ Nation

Chadwick Moore, the openly gay writer who wrote a fluffy, softball profile of racist, misogynist, transphobe Milo Yiannopoulos last year for a magazine aimed at LGBTQ readers, hasjoined Milo on the other side. Hes come out as a right wingerin an op-ed in the New York Post.

I finally had to admit to myself that I am closer to the right than where the left is today. And, yes, just three months ago, I voted for Hillary Clinton.

Moore said in his op-ed that while he supported stronger immigration enforcement he was against the wall President Trump is intent on building along Mexicos border with the United States.

I imagine hes not going to agree with every conservative position at this time, said Gregory Angelo, president of the Log Cabin Republicans. We welcome anyone who would support Ronald Reagans 80/20 rule.

That rule harkens back to a quote by the president who stood in the way of properly addressingthe AIDS crisis when it first emerged: The person who agrees with you 80 percent of the time is a friend and an ally not a 20 percent traitor.

I feel far more welcome as a gay man in Republican circles than I everdo as a Republican in gay circles, Angelo told LGBTQ Nation in a phone interview Monday.

Moores switch to conservative, the writer claims, came as a result of the backlash he received for writing that flattering profile of the openly gay Breitbart editor. People he called friends turned their backs to him. People told him he was a Nazi, a monster, and those friends suddenly started avoiding him like the plague, he wrote.

I felt awful but not so awful that I would keep opinions to myself.

And I began to realize that maybe my opinions just didnt fit in with the liberal status quo, which seems to mean that you must absolutely hate Trump, his supporters and everything they believe. If you dare not to protest or boycott Trump, you are a traitor.

If you dare to question liberal stances or make an effort toward understanding why conservatives think the way they do, you are a traitor.

It can seem like liberals are actually against free speech if it fails to conform with the way they think. And I dont want to be a part of that club anymore.

Angelo told LGBTQ Nation he wasnt surprised at how Moore was treated.I have seen more people defriended unfriended and exiled by liberals over the last three months than I ever have in my career, he said.

Not surprisingly, Breitbart picked up the op-ed and reported on it. Although Yiannopoulos is banned from Twitter for life for harassing actress Leslie Jones he does have a profile on Facebook and as of press time he has not made a comment, nor responded to a request for one from LGBTQ Nation.

In his original creampuff profile, Moore concluded with a quote from the hatemonger that he sees himself as the canary in the coalmine, and a prophetic statement that, given Moores coming out as a conservative, might shed new light on his own political point of view.

I am one of the primary engines of change in American culture because Im demonstrating that someone sassy and silly and gay and flamboyant who loves RuPauls Drag Race and sucks black dick doesnt have to vote Democrat, Yiannopoulos told Moore. That matters. Thats really important.

Moore addressed his smoochy profile in a tweet early Monday.

Since the news came out, Moore has been tweeting that hes received an outpouring of support.

One note was from a parent of a conservative gay man, who said he was scared to come out as anything but liberal.

And part of his new outlook appears to be the bashing of the industry for which he earns his living.

Moore apologized for his liberal past to transphobe and far right pundit Ann Coulter and gave a shoutout to anti-progressive, transgender YouTube sensation and arch conservative Blaire White.

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Writer who profiled Milo Yiannopoulos says backlash turned him conservative – LGBTQ Nation

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Milo Yiannopoulos delays memoir to add details of protests against it – The Guardian

Controversy continues Milo Yiannopoulos speaking at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Photograph: Jeremy Papasso/AP Publication of rightwing controversialist Milo Yiannopouloss memoir Dangerous has been delayed until June, so that he can include details of the controversy surrounding his book deal and the recent student protests that resulted in cancelled speaking events. In a statement, Yiannopoulos said he had asked his publisher to postpone the launch, originally scheduled for March, to enable him to write about the craziness and rioting at three sites in the US: the Berkeley and Davis campuses at the University of California, and the Seattle campus at the University of Washington. It would be absurd for me to publish a book without some discussion of the insanity of the last few weeks, said the far-right provocateur, who is technology editor of Breitbart News. Breitbarts former executive chair, Steve Bannon, is now President Trumps chief strategist. Yiannopouloss speaking tour at university campuses has been dogged by protests and violent clashes between his supporters, police and protesters. The book was due to be published on 14 March by Threshold Editions, an imprint of Simon & Schuster (S&S) that specialises in rightwing writing. It is now set to appear on 13 June. Dangerous has proved a major headache for the publishing house after it paid Yiannopoulos a reported $250,000 (203,000) advance. Though the writer had claimed the deal was cooked up over lunch with the publisher, it has since emerged that it had been shopped around other New York publishing houses, who had not found it commercial enough to warrant a substantial offer. A vociferous backlash followed his signing, with authors, critics and booksellers voicing concern about his involvement in far-right politics and alleged trolling of opponents through social media. The British-born writer was permanently banned from Twitter in 2016, after claims he had incited followers to send abusive messages to the Ghostbusters actor Leslie Jones. He has also likened feminism to cancer and attacked transgender people as retarded. Dismissing him as a clickbait grifter who has made a name for himself spewing hate speech, Adam Morgan, editor of the Chicago Review of Books, said his publication would not review any books published by S&S in protest at the deal. Last month, in what was widely seen as a damage-limitation exercise, S&S president and CEO Carolyn Reidy wrote to authors to reassure them that Yiannopouloss book would not contain hate speech. Instead, it would be a substantive examination of the issues surrounding political correctness and free speech, she wrote. Despite this, essayist and feminist author Roxane Gay announced that she would withdraw her forthcoming book from S&S because of the Yiannopoulos deal. It is not the first book mooted by the journalist, who remains an influential figure in the so-called alt-right movement. In 2014, Yiannopoulos claimed he was writing a book about Gamergate, and in 2015, a book called The Sociopaths of Silicon Valley. Neither book appeared. He has also found it hard to find a publisher in the UK, after S&Ss British subsidiary walked away from a deal. Insiders in the big four publishing houses said he was not well known in the UK and doubted the book could work without a significant promotional platform.

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How trolls like Milo Yiannopoulos monetize your hate, and what to do about it – Boing Boing

This week’s edition of the always, always-excellent On the Media podcast featured an interview (MP3) with notorious (and self-confessed) media manipulator Ryan Holiday, whose book, Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator describes his career in PR, in which he perfected the art of making terrible people rich by getting decent people to hate them. At the core of Holiday’s theory is the idea that young men with disposable income will do anything so long as someone tells them that they’re forbidden to do so. He did this very successfully for Tucker Max, the “pick up artist” guru who provided advice to men on tricking or coercing women into having sex with them. Holiday describes how he defaced his client’s own ads, tipped off activist groups to upcoming appearances in order to gin up controversy and ensure noisy demonstrations, and worked to encourage city bus companies to yank his clients’ ads and activists to create petitions to cancel Max’s speaking appearances. He likens this to the Milo Yiannopoulos playbook, saying that Yiannopoulos identifies the people who will hate him who have the biggest public followings, then works to specifically offend those people so that they tell other people not to listen to him. Though most people will take the critics’ advice, there is a large, widely distributed group of young men who will also encounter the message, decide that no one will tell them what to think, and thus become unquestioning Yiannopoulos brownshirts. In an accompanying article in The Observer, Holiday described the tactic in detail, then offers a countermeasure: show up, listen respectfully, then devastate them from the floor with counterarguments. Don’t let them be the underdog darlings of reactionary manbabies. If you actually want to fight back against these trolls, heres a strategy to consider: Organize all you want, get as many people as you can to show up at their events, but dont try to shut them down. In fact, the only thing you should try to shut down are the instigators who try to incite violence. Regain the moral high ground by saying that you absolutely respect their right to free speech. And then, actually listen and talk to them. To me, the most effective retorts against the alt-right were when Trevor Noah had Tomi Lahren on his show and when Elle Reeve profiled Richard Spencer for Vice. Both came off looking mostly like jokes. Tomi Lahren showed her age. Richard Spencer revealed his movement to be mostly a collection of a few thousand sad dorks. Wales Twitter exchange with Tomi was effective toothere was no outrage, no opposition, just teasing. They say sunlight is the best disinfectant. But it is also what allows you to see whether the emperor has any clothes. And its this sad, and often pathetic reality, that the collective hysteria has beneficently covered up in those its trying to fight. What should be seen as farce somehow looks like real fascism. How To Counter Milo’s Trolling Playbook [On the Media] report this ad In Out of Control: Ransomware for Industrial Control Systems, three Georgia Tech computer scientists describe their work to develop LogicLocker, a piece of proof-of-concept ransomware that infects the programmable logic controllers that are used to control industrial systems like those in power plants. Ingrid Burrington thought of domain names as a very niche genre of experimental poetry, one in which radical constraints (availability, brevity, the cadence of an interrupting dot) produce small, densely packed pockets of internet magic. At a conference for domainersthe dot.whatever squatters and salesfolk and speculatorsshe learned that its more a matter of alchemy. brevity [] It seems there isnt a demographic that justifies stocking Ivanka Trumps Trump Home items theyve now been removed from high-end retailer Nordstroms, mid-range retailer Sears, and low-end retailer Kmart. 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But finding the right vape for you can be tricky: cheap units may be dangerous, and higher prices dont necessarily mean superior quality. Youve got to find a happy medium. I just so happen to have done the legwork for [] report this ad

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

What shut down Milo Yiannopoulos? – Socialist Worker Online

DEREK WRIGHT (“Making sense of what happened at Berkeley”) and Mukund Rathi (“Thousands confront the right at UC Berkeley”) are too quick to dismiss the Black Bloc’s role in shutting down Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California-Berkeley. They are right that smashing windows off campus served no useful purpose, but on dubious ground when they imply (or state, in Derek’s case) that the white nationalist event would have been shut down without the Bloc’s intervention. It’s impossible to say with certainty, but I saw a handful of event attendees or organizers slip through the crowd prior to the Bloc’s entrance, and from my vantage point, it seems unlikely that a simple blockade would have worked without either more numbers or better organization. In any case, it seems clear that the Bloc’s attack on the student center was, as things actually played out, one of the reasons that university police made the decision to call off the event–a decision which was a blow to the far right and a morale boost for our side. This remains a victory even if the means of winning it left the majority of protesters playing a more passive role than we might desire. SocialistWorker.org welcomes our readers’ contributions to discussion and debate about articles we’ve published and questions facing the left. Opinions expressed in these contributions don’t necessarily reflect those of SW. The reason this matters is not that the general arguments Mukund and Derek make against the Black Bloc are wrong. The Bloc, at least in its U.S. incarnation, has not been a tactic either aimed at or useful in building the mass movement we desperately need. The reason is simply that accurately describing the pros and cons of different tactics is necessary to formulating a strategy for the new political period inaugurated along with Trump. Street-fighting tactics have helped the left at various periods of history, and even if we don’t think that will be true in the next months and years, we should base our assessment on present reality. We should also avoid speculating without real evidence that protesters might be undercover cops. This is unnecessarily divisive in an argument about tactics and strategy, and sowing suspicions of infiltration has itself at times been used as a repressive tactic by the state. David Judd, Oakland, California

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

New York Post Smears MILO as ‘Alt-Right Extremist’

The New York Post smeared Breitbart Senior Editor MILO as an “alt-right extremist” in a recent article mentioning the Dangerous Faggot, despite the fact that MILO has repeatedly dismissed the label.

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

OUT Magazine’s Chadwick Moore Comes Out as Conservative, Cites Backlash from Left Following MILO Profile

Chadwick Moore, a contributor for the LGBT magazine OUT, has come out as a conservative in an article for The New York Post, citing his gradual move to the right after left-wing friends ousted and rejected him for his neutral profile on Breitbart Senior Editor MILO.

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

It looks like Milo Yiannopoulos is working out of the Tucker Max playbook – A.V. Club

See all latest (Photo: Getty Images, Drew Angerer) (Photo: Getty Images, Drew Angerer) If something about the series of events that turned Milo Yiannopoulos from a sexist Twitter creep into a sexist Twitter creep with a book deal seems familiar, it could be because we all experienced something similar before with the meteoric rise (and painful fall) of proto-bro Tucker Max. Back in 2009, Max was a blogger trying to promote his I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell movie with a very limited budget, so a marketing whiz named Ryan Holiday came up with a crazy scheme to convince young dudes to see a movie: try to stop them from seeing it. Holiday is now editor-at-large for the Observer, and hes written an extensive piece about how his Tucker Max strategy has been adopted by Yiannopoulos, his supporters, and other racist/sexist/alt-right assholes who are trying to spread hate and incite fear. As Holiday explains, they promoted Maxs movie (and his book of the same name) by buying cheap ads that they would call people to complain about, by submitting fake tips about Tucker Max-related controversies to Gawker, and by vandalizing their own billboards to make Tucker Max seem dangerous, subversive, andmost of allsuper cool. Holiday is now seeing these same strategies being used to promote Yiannopoulos, and he wants people to recognize how easily they can play right into the hands of these jerks. Holiday says the trick isnt to try to take away Yiannopoulos platform by protesting his campus talks or whatever, because that will just give his supporters something to rally against. Instead, he suggests actually listening to people like Yiannopoulos and giving them a chance to speak, because then the public will have a chance to hear their awful, hateful ideas and theyllhopefullyrecognize them as being awful and hateful. Holiday says the sales of Tuckers books disappeared when the controversy and outrage surrounding him ran its course, so he believes that Yiannopoulos and Nazis like Richard Spencer will eventually get bored or tire themselves out if everyone stops feeding their marketing machines. The argument here is fairly optimistic, suggesting that taking the high ground will always work out in the long run. But Holiday also seems to believe that all press is good press. These days, when social media has given everyone in the world the ability to tell someone that their ideas are bad and that they should feel bad, its important to not dismiss the power of simply laughing at someone in the face for being an attention-seeking loserwhich Yiannopoulos certainly is. After all, even Donald Trump is starting to crack under the pressure of his unpopularity, so maybe the trick to getting rid of Yiannopoulos is constantly making fun of him on TV for several months. Submit your Newswire tips here. Previous Newswire ABC casts its first black Bachelorette Next Newswire Edward James Olmos joins Sons Of Anarchy spin-off Mayans MC

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Tucker Carlson Faces Off With Guest Who Calls Milo Yiannopoulos a Fascist – Mediaite

Please enable Javascript to watch. Tucker Carlson tonight faced off with Yvette Felarca, who was at Berkeley protesting Milo Yiannopoulos (where protests quickly turned into riots), who she considers to be a fascist. She said that Yiannopoulos is trying to whip up a lynch mob of people that then goes out and attacks women, immigrants, minorities, and others. And she doesnt believe he should be allowed to speak and recruit others to that cause. Carlson pointed to the whole free speech issue here and asked her exactly what she wants to see happen to Yiannopoulos if she considers him to be a dangerous fascist. He repeatedly pressed this issue as Felarca argued that people have a right to defend themselves when unsafe environments are being created for a lot of people. Watch the whole segment above, via Fox News. [image via screengrab] Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Catherine Rampell: What Milo Yiannopoulos and Elizabeth Warren have in common – Billings Gazette

What’s the best way to make sure a message gets heard? Try to muzzle it. Both liberals and conservatives are newly rediscovering the political power of this phenomenon, known as the Streisand Effect. The term refers to what happens when an attempt to censor information backfires and instead unintentionally draws more attention to the censorship target. Its namesake is Barbra Streisand, who in 2003 sued a photographer for including a photograph of her Malibu home among a series of 12,000 aerial images documenting California coastal erosion. Thanks to the lawsuit, which was unsuccessful, this previously little-seen photo soon received enormous publicity and hundreds of thousands of views. Plenty of other celebrities, companies and government agencies have come to rue the times they inadvertently publicized things they were trying to smother. Meanwhile, provocateurs and activists have learned how to weaponize the Streisand Effect, using censorship attempts to amplify their own voices. After all, suppression of speech not only generates more public interest, as bystanders scramble to learn what all the fuss is about; it can also win the speaker sympathy and the moral high ground. So far this month, there have been two major and, in different ways, instructive examples of political speech being amplified by censorship. On Feb. 7, during Senate debate over the confirmation of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., as attorney general, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., began reading a 1986 letter from civil rights icon Coretta Scott King. King had opposed Sessions’s nomination to a federal judgeship, on grounds that he had used his position as a federal prosecutor to suppress black votes. As she read King’s letter, Warren was stopped, scolded and formally silenced by Republican senators. These senatorial snowflakes, it seems, were more interested in silencing speech they disliked than rebutting it. The primary consequences were to energize the left and make King’s once-obscure letter go viral. Warren has not indicated that she was trying to goad her colleagues into silencing her. But she could have hardly conceived of a better way to magnify her message, or her own stature. “She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted,” Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., declared, in phrasing that seems perfectly scripted for a 2020 presidential campaign ad. A week earlier, on the opposite coast, a completely different kind of character from the other side of the political spectrum appeared to leverage the Streisand Effect for less noble purposes. Milo Yiannopoulos, Breitbart writer and sleazy professional troll, has built a career out of stoking Pavlovian outrage and censorship attempts from the left in order to build his audience on the right. He has mocked Jews, Muslims, African Americans, feminists, people who are overweight and the LGBT community (though he himself is gay), among others. Clearly, the goal is to bait his intellectual opponents (not all of whom are liberal, mind you) into trying to forcibly silence him. Sometimes you’re not trying to score. Sometimes you’re just trying to draw a foul. Sure enough, Yiannopoulos’s opponents happily oblige, with heckles, threats and sometimes even violence such as the riots that erupted at the University of California at Berkeley this month, which led to the cancellation of his talk and his evacuation from campus. The riots didn’t silence Yiannopoulos, however; instead, the resulting coverage megaphoned his ugly message to a much broader audience and will help him sell more books, schedule more lucrative speaking gigs and receive more sympathetic tweets from our sitting president. (President Trump, under the guidance of former Breitbart publisher Stephen K. Bannon, has also proved especially adept at alchemizing liberal indignation into self-aggrandizing news coverage.) There are many compelling arguments for why protecting free speech, including speech you disagree with or even abhor, is important. It’s enshrined in our Constitution; it is among the sacred liberal values we promote throughout the world; free and open dialogue helps advance scientific inquiry; and so on. But one underappreciated argument is self-interest. Forcibly silencing and thereby martyring your opponents rather than employing counter-speech to expose them as wrong or, better yet, ridiculous may be exactly what they want you to do.

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Writer who profiled Milo Yiannopoulos says backlash turned him conservative – LGBTQ Nation

Chadwick Moore, the openly gay writer who wrote a fluffy, softball profile of racist, misogynist, transphobe Milo Yiannopoulos last year for a magazine aimed at LGBTQ readers, hasjoined Milo on the other side. Hes come out as a right wingerin an op-ed in the New York Post. I finally had to admit to myself that I am closer to the right than where the left is today. And, yes, just three months ago, I voted for Hillary Clinton. Moore said in his op-ed that while he supported stronger immigration enforcement he was against the wall President Trump is intent on building along Mexicos border with the United States. I imagine hes not going to agree with every conservative position at this time, said Gregory Angelo, president of the Log Cabin Republicans. We welcome anyone who would support Ronald Reagans 80/20 rule. That rule harkens back to a quote by the president who stood in the way of properly addressingthe AIDS crisis when it first emerged: The person who agrees with you 80 percent of the time is a friend and an ally not a 20 percent traitor. I feel far more welcome as a gay man in Republican circles than I everdo as a Republican in gay circles, Angelo told LGBTQ Nation in a phone interview Monday. Moores switch to conservative, the writer claims, came as a result of the backlash he received for writing that flattering profile of the openly gay Breitbart editor. People he called friends turned their backs to him. People told him he was a Nazi, a monster, and those friends suddenly started avoiding him like the plague, he wrote. I felt awful but not so awful that I would keep opinions to myself. And I began to realize that maybe my opinions just didnt fit in with the liberal status quo, which seems to mean that you must absolutely hate Trump, his supporters and everything they believe. If you dare not to protest or boycott Trump, you are a traitor. If you dare to question liberal stances or make an effort toward understanding why conservatives think the way they do, you are a traitor. It can seem like liberals are actually against free speech if it fails to conform with the way they think. And I dont want to be a part of that club anymore. Angelo told LGBTQ Nation he wasnt surprised at how Moore was treated.I have seen more people defriended unfriended and exiled by liberals over the last three months than I ever have in my career, he said. Not surprisingly, Breitbart picked up the op-ed and reported on it. Although Yiannopoulos is banned from Twitter for life for harassing actress Leslie Jones he does have a profile on Facebook and as of press time he has not made a comment, nor responded to a request for one from LGBTQ Nation. In his original creampuff profile, Moore concluded with a quote from the hatemonger that he sees himself as the canary in the coalmine, and a prophetic statement that, given Moores coming out as a conservative, might shed new light on his own political point of view. I am one of the primary engines of change in American culture because Im demonstrating that someone sassy and silly and gay and flamboyant who loves RuPauls Drag Race and sucks black dick doesnt have to vote Democrat, Yiannopoulos told Moore. That matters. Thats really important. Moore addressed his smoochy profile in a tweet early Monday. Since the news came out, Moore has been tweeting that hes received an outpouring of support. One note was from a parent of a conservative gay man, who said he was scared to come out as anything but liberal. And part of his new outlook appears to be the bashing of the industry for which he earns his living. Moore apologized for his liberal past to transphobe and far right pundit Ann Coulter and gave a shoutout to anti-progressive, transgender YouTube sensation and arch conservative Blaire White.

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February 14, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed


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