Archive for the ‘Milo Yiannopoulos’ Category

Watch: Pamela Geller, Milo, Raheem Kassam and More Discuss The Islamic Jihad Against Free Speech in ‘Can’t We Talk About This?’


Can’t We Talk About This? The Islamic Jihad Against Free Speech is a shocking new film and follow-up video series detailing the concerted effort by international organizations to compel the U.S. and other Western countries to curtail freedom of speech and criminalize criticism of Islam. Featuring exclusive interviews with Pamela Geller, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Geert Wilders, Mark Steyn, Milo Yiannopolous, Raheem Kassam, Robert Spencer, Douglas Murray, Ezra Levant, Lars Vilks, Garland Muhammad cartoon contest winner Bosch Fawstin, and many other heroes of freedom, this web series will be the first ever to expose the war on free speech. It is certain to shock the American public and awaken many. These interviews reveal events at Garland and its aftermath that have never before been made public and demonstrate how far advanced the war on free speech really is. “In this film, we’re setting the record straight about our Garland free speech event, at which we were not only targeted by Islamic jihadis but apparently by the FBI as well,” Pamela Geller wrote at Breitbart News. “But we’re doing much more as well: we’re telling the whole, as-yet-untold truth about the war on free speech.” Breitbart readers can enter the code “BREITBART” to watch for

See the rest here:
Watch: Pamela Geller, Milo, Raheem Kassam and More Discuss The Islamic Jihad Against Free Speech in ‘Can’t We Talk About This?’

Fair Usage Law

September 10, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

My Worst Date: ‘He said Milo Yiannopoulos made some good points’ – iNews

I knew it was going to be a bad date when: he told me transgenderism shouldnt be normalised, the gender pay gap was a myth, Milo Yiannopoulos made some good points and Donald Trump was a better president than Hillary Clinton could ever be.

It was our: second date

We met: on Tinder

When I challenged certain opinions, he mansplainedthat he had studiedsociology extensively so was more qualified to hold opinions on these subjects

I thought he seemed: super charming and attentive on the first date, neverchecking his phone. We had a good connection, making jokes about Vladimir Putin and Kanye West.

He offered to pay for dinner (I always pay half, but the gesture was nice), walked me to the bus stop, asked if he could hold my hand and then asked if he could steal a kiss.

He got up from the table and announced he had to be sick in the toilets because he was hungover

Date two was like being with a different person. He was late, moody and left it up to me to fill the awkward gaps in conversation.

On the date: When I challenged certain opinions, he mansplainedthat he had studiedsociology extensively so was more qualified to hold opinions on these subjects.

The more he relaxed and shared his personal and political views, the more uncomfortable I grew.

The worst part was: when he got up from the table and announced he had to be sick in the toilets because he was quite badly hungover.

The date ended when: I told him I had to work early the next morning so needed to leave.

Afterwards, he sent me abusive messages telling me I had been a fucking waste of time’

After that: I messaged him and said while it was nice meeting him, I didnt think we were a good fit and it would be best not to see each other again. He was genuinely shocked.

Over the next three days he sent me abusive messages telling me I had been a fucking waste of time.

We had been talking through WhatsApp so when the abuse got too much and I blocked him, he switched to texting instead.

I even apologised if I had hurt his feelings. That seemed to fuel the rage.

If he got in touch today: I would praise the fact that technology has a block option.

These days I am: single and relieved.

In hindsight: it gives me a good story to tell on my next date.

@kt_grant

If you have a disastrous Worst Dateyoud like to get off your chest please email a brief synopsis of your experience to [emailprotected]

Continue reading here:

My Worst Date: ‘He said Milo Yiannopoulos made some good points’ – iNews

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Dangerous New Book Isn’t Even Worth Hating – Gizmodo

Former Breitbart tech editor Milo Yiannopoulos is scheduled to publish his book Dangerous next Tuesday, on Independence Day. Ahead of that release Gizmodo has obtained a copy of the finished book, as well as the January draft previously leaked to Buzzfeed. Maybe the most controversial book of the decade was intended as a career comeback, but it reads like an epitaph.

Ugly as his beliefs may be, its inarguable that Milos built his career by knowing how to captivate an audience.By contrast, Dangerous is dreadfully dull. Beneath the regurgitated propaganda arguing against a fair, multicultural, egalitarian society is a portrait of an e-celebrity without an audience, a blogger without a publisher, and, above all, an attention-seeking troll whose playbook of goads no longer elicits any emotion whatsoever. To the detriment of the book, self-reflection is utterly absent.

Originally, the book was to be published in mid-March by Simon & Schuster. But following the discovery of an interview in which Yiannopoulos appeared to condone pedophilia by referencing his own sexual experiences with older men at the age of 13, he offered an ignominious resignation from his position with Breitbart, was disinvited from CPAC where he was slated to be a keynote speaker, and was dropped by his publisher, all in short order. Disgraced, he later made clear his intentions to sue Simon & Schuster, though no such suit has materialized.

With self-publishing his only remaining option, Yiannopoulos largely dropped out of the spotlight, presumably to finish writing Dangerous.

Milos opus clocks in at just over 68,000 words when stripped of front and backmatter, although that number is closer to 63,000 due to his compulsive penchant for padding chapters with lengthy quotes, the origins of which range from Andrew Breitbart to Hannah Arendt to Gizmodo.

In a statement to Buzzfeed, Milo claims the leaked draft had been substantially rewritten since [January]. Surprisingly, the prose does look to have been revamped somewhat. Theres a new introduction blithely titled So About That Whole Drama which addresses his disinvitation from CPAC and ensuing fall from disgrace; a subsection titled Milos College Rankings which lists a mere 16 higher learning institutions divided into two cliche tabloid-style categoriesHeroes and Zeroes; a few paragraphs now discuss the barely-remembered donglegate dustup from 2013.

The substance of the book has remained largely unchanged in the six month interim. It remains a tedious and at times bitter self-defense written by a man who claims to enjoy the negative attention he sought out. In the parlance of Twittera platform Yiannopoulos hasnt been welcome on for nearly a yearDangerous is 275 pages of Im not owned! Im not owned!

Just as was the case before, Dangerous gives away nothing of Yiannopouloss upbringing, his time at Breitbart, or scuffle with the Republican establishment which ruined him. Heres a smattering of the topics which Milo spent many months writing and rewriting: Is Pepe the frog a racist symbol? Was Twitter right to ban him? Why are feminists ignoring the plights of men? Is abortion wrong? Does rape culture exist? Is the one-in-four women statistic about sexual assault accurate? Are Muslims all terrible people? Is the Black Lives Matter movement full of shit? Should Brianna Wu, Anita Sarkeesian, and Zoe Quinn be grateful for their harassment by GamerGatea movement which hit its peak relevance nearly three years ago?

Anyone with even a passing familiarity with Milos brand already knows his stances, which have been enunciated louder and more compellingly by other personalities in the right-wing mediaand debunked many times over. (Theyre also topics which Milo has already written about exhaustively in blog posts for Breitbart, which can be read for free.) Dangerous is not offensive, shocking, or thought-provoking. Had it met its original release date of mid-March, many of the topics contained within would still have felt well past their prime.

Page after page recounting years-long grudges suggest that what he sees as the soft, identity-obsessed, participation award-craving liberals Milo makes his money riling up are the very same people whose affection and understanding he desperately craves. In his own words: People often accuse me of being an attention-seeker. Theyre right, of course.

Milo also expends considerable ink griping about the lefts readiness to conflate right-leaning groups and misunderstand the language and tactics deployed by his former cohorts; meanwhile he fails to grasp and goes out of his way to undermine core concepts important to the Black Lives Matter movement, transgender people (whom he refers to as trannies), Muslims, and feminism, among others. Is it surprising to see bald hypocrisy in Dangerous? Of course not. But throughout he also refers to the political movement of which he was a figurehead as the alt-righta label which young, moderate conservatives still clinging to ideas espoused by Milo (and others) almost universally reject due to its association with white nationalism.

One of the few cogent ideological threads that can be followed through the maze of petty grievances that is Dangerous is Milos enduring belief in the power of humor. Be twice as funny as you are outrageous, because no one can resist the truth wrapped in a good joke, he suggests, correctly, though the lesson manages to evade him. Attempts at humor in the book fall flat, not for being offensive, but for being either obvious or overly shrill. Perhaps knowing this, the line Im just too smart, too funny, too popular and too successful to ignore in the January draft is omitted, substituted by a humbler appeal to the content of his character:

Im not the best because Im the funniest or the smartest or the most attractive person among conservative and libertarian celebrities. Im the best because I work harder than everyone else.

Likewise the subsection Why Im So Great no longer appears in the finished product. In the course of trying (and failing) to insult anyone and everyone, Yiannopoulos manages to liken himself to a diverse cast of characters both real and fictional that include Oscar Wilde, Freddy Mercury, Nigel Farage, Martin Luther King Jr., Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and the raptors in Jurassic Park. But the toning down of his characters signature egotism manages to make the book all the duller. Its a shame he lacked the conviction to fully inhabit the character now that its his own money on the line rather than Simon & Schusters.

Part and parcel to Milos affinity to abuse quotes like a high school student desperate to hit a page count, Dangerous is nothing if not an attempt to ingratiate himself back into any group who will have him. Positive name-drops include Ann Coulter, PayPal founder Peter Thiel, Fox Newss Tucker Carlson, Rebel Medias Lauren Southern, Lucian Wintrich of The Gateway Pundit, YouTube personalities Stephan Molyneux and Daniel Keem, James OKeefe of Project Veritas infamy, and Trump advisor and former boss Steve Bannon. (The former two even submitted blurbs for the book jacket.)

And of course, Trump himself, whom he frequently refers to as daddy.

But there are appearances to keep up, and Milo couches his subtextual contrition/job hunt with any opportunity to flaunt his credentials as a rebellious anti-establishment type, including a few toothless warnings to his own:

Like the Lefts political correctness, the Rights political correctness is collectivist and reductive in its logic. It will destroy the lives of innocent people if it goes unchecked. We must fight against it until it dies.

The majority of the bile Yiannopoulos spits towards the rightwing is directed at old-guard Republicans, embodiments of a rigged system. Had he stuck by what few principles he has and declined the invitation to speak at CPACwhich managed to tarnish his reputation in a way the media simply couldnthis 15 minutes of fame might well have extended into a legitimate political career.

All memes die. Its a fact of the internet Milo inhabits. And Milo, the memetic avatar designed to drive oversensitive liberals into apoplectic rage, has reached the end of its internet shelf life. His schtick has been done better by others, and the reactionary cruelty which elicited horror now only registers as a grating hum. Ironically, in helping elect Trump, Milo and those like him made themselves obsolete: America now faces greater problems than the mean-spirited shitposts of a preening hack.

Original post:

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Dangerous New Book Isn’t Even Worth Hating – Gizmodo

Fair Usage Law

June 29, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s self-published book is all about how mean everyone is to him – Quartz

Milo Yiannopoulos doesnt care. He doesnt care that the mainstream media hates him, that the alt-right hates him, that feminists hate him. Hes so over it that hes written 250 pages devoted entirely to the various parties who vilify him.

Dangerous, the autobiography by the former Breitbart editor and proud internet troll, will be released on July 4. Originally set for a March debut, the book was dropped by Simon & Schuster in February after an interview with Yiannopoulos surfaced in which he appeared to brush off pedophilia. Now Yiannopoulos is self-publishing Dangerous, which has been hovering in the top 20 books on Amazon this month.

Based on its first 50 pages (provided to Quartz by a publicist for Yiannopoulos), Dangerous is not so much filled with the authors patented hate-speech, as early critics anticipated, as it is with his hate for the mainstream media and the left. Most of all, though, the book is about the worlds hate for the man who has referred to Islam as AIDS and feminism as cancer.

Yiannopoulos begins the book by addressing the controversy that cost him his deal with Simon & Schuster, plainly stating that he doesnt condone pedophilia or hebephilia. He calls himself a victim of sexual abuse, but then writes:

The only way I can truly be a victim is to wallow in what happened and let it define me. If youre reading this, and you have been abused, and you are wallowing, I will give you the most important piece of advice I have: get over it. Move on.

He adds, There are real victims out there, and together, you and I are going to fight for them. Were going to do so without self-pity, without a cult of victimhood, and certainly without safe spaces.

Despite his distaste for victimhood, Yiannopoulos does a lot to paint himself as a victima fabulous but misunderstood personality relentlessly targeted by the media and the political left. The excerpt provided by Yiannopouloss publicist includes three separate introductions and the first two chapters are titled Why the Progressive Left Hates Me and Why the Alt-Right Hates Me. The remaining chapters are named for other groups that reportedly hate the author, including feminists, Black Lives Matter, the media, establishment gays, and Muslims. One exception to the convention is a chapter on gamers, who do not, apparently, hate Yiannopoulos.

He goes on to inform his readers that they are victims of a cultural elite. He writes that the movie 10 Years a Slave (sicits actually 12) is proof that a kind white man has no place in popular culture. White men cant dance, jump or sexually satisfy their partners, he writes. These are all socially acceptable jokes.

The book reads largely as a defense of Yiannopouloss unabashed brand of conservative contempt and scorn for the press. His mandate to his readers is [fight] for your right to speak freely, honestly, and rudely, no matter who doesnt like it. For those readers already turned onto his particular venom, the book could work. He makes a compelling appeal to people (namely straight white men) who feel left out of what he calls a league table of oppression.

Hes also deeply critical of college campus culture, writing:

The practitioners of the new political correctness are not equipped for a world in which individuals can disagree with what is deemed appropriate thought. They rely on silencing the opposition with hysterics, instead of winning with superior ideas. Purposefully or unwittingly, a generation of Americans now exists that is terrified of critical thinking.

Of course what the author does not offer, at least in these 50 pages, is how to achieve that level of open discourse through saying whatever one wants at whatever time. Though he writes that the art of trolling lies in debunking some untruth or exposing wrongdoing or hypocrisy, its not clear how he has elevated the level of critical thinking. Its likewise unclear how calling actor Leslie Jones a barely literate black dude passes for debunking. What Yiannopoulos has missed is that belligerence itself is not a superior idea.

Go here to see the original:

Milo Yiannopoulos’s self-published book is all about how mean everyone is to him – Quartz

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Restaurant Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos’ Book Release Party – Out Magazine

Milo Yiannopoulos has learned that it isnt easy to find a New York venue to host a party promoting his new bookespecially Saturday night of Pride Week. The outspoken, alt-right commentator allegedly misrepresented his party as a pride event to secure his first-choice venue Jue Lan Club, a dim sum restaurant in the LGBTQ-friendly Chelsea neighborhood. When the owner discovered Yiannopouloss deception, he canceled the reservation.

I had no idea this was booked, Stratis Morfogen, proprietor of Jue Lan Club, told Page Six. It was told to us it was a gay pride event. We don’t get involved or take sides with politics, religion, etc.”

While the party went ahead at another venue, Yiannopoulos took to his website to blame liberals who he believed pressured his first choice into canceling the event. Angry, bitter leftists have seized control over the Pride celebration and made it a political statement against President Trump, Yiannopoulos said.

Yiannopouloss inflammatory remarks have placed him increasingly at odds with the mainstream public. In February, UC Berkley canceled a speaking engagement with the alt-right spokesperson after protests erupted on the campus. Shortly afterwards, Simon & Schuster, the original publishers of Dangerous, dropped Yiannopoulos after he gave an interview in which he appeared to make light of pedophilia.

Follow this link:

Restaurant Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos’ Book Release Party – Out Magazine

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Queer Villains Remind Us That Gay Does Not Always Equal Good – Slate Magazine (blog)

Milo Yiannopoulos waits to speak at an Alt Right protest of Muslim activist Linda Sarsour on April 25, 2017 in New York City.

Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Say what you will about 2016that it was a reeking dumpster fire, maybe, or a malfunctioning computer that needed to be turned off and rebootedbut the year thrust a few magnificent villains into the spotlight. There was Peter Thiel, a dead-eyed billionaire who called his bid to a help a racist millionaire destroy a news outlet philanthropic, and who didnt exactly not say hed suck teen blood for immortality. We also got Milo Yiannopoulos, a Nazi-sympathizing bizarro Ken doll with a British accent and a talent for turning the internets latent undercurrents of hate into waves of violent threats.

These men are more than just bad actors on the national stage: They seek influence and use it for evil means, then show no remorse. They are comic booklevel villains. And they also happen to be two of the most visible gay men in America.

Neither Thiels gayness nor Yiannopoulos are incidental to their rise to infamy. Dangerous Faggot is Yiannopoulos preferred moniker and the name of his controversy-ridden campus speaking tour. PayPal co-founder Thiel was barely known outside Silicon Valley until he funneled millions of dollars into Hulk Hogans lawsuit against Gawker, which successfully sunk the news site. He had no connection to Hogan, a known homophobe. But Gawker had once written a blog post about Thiels sexuality, and though Thiel was already out at the time, he claimed to be a victim of the sites bullying. In other words, his fame stemmed directly from his sexuality. These men are not closeted or quietly gay homosexuals: They are here, they are queer, and they would probably object to my use of that term, associated as it is with the kind of pan-LGBTQ identity politics both despise.

And yet, these gay villains were called upon to foreground their queerdom in their shared fight to elect Donald Trump. Each had his part to play. Yiannopoulos further inflamed the festering staph infection that is Breitbart News and helped equate racist, sexist, and xenophobic harassment with acceptable public discourse. Thiel poured at least $1.25 million into Trumps campaign and spoke in Trumps support at the Republican National Convention. In that address, Thiel both highlighted and downplayed his quasi-historic speaking slot. I am proud to be gay, Thiel said. But also, LGBTQ rights are the focus of fake culture wars that only distract us from oureconomic decline.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Yiannopoulos, meanwhile, became a go-to voice of the alt-right, which helped make white men scared for their own supremacy. He encouraged them get their anger out by bashing black actresses just for being black and female, and by voting for a man who seemed to hate women and immigrants as much as they did. Because he is gay, Yiannopoulos was able to appoint himself a leather-clad, popper-sniffing best friend who gives straight bigots permission to call progressive queer people faggots and use the phrase thats so gay as an insult. Thiel and Yiannopoulos are palatable to the right wing because theyre white, male, and ideological extremists, but their villainy is enhanced, not mitigated, by their queerness. Their endorsement of a party that works at every turn to impede the rights of LGBTQ people allows straight conservatives to badmouth queers and feel justified because a gay told them it was OK.

LEO CALDWELL

Increasing Trans Visibility Has a Downside: Pressure to Conform to Conventional Beauty Ideals

CHRISTINA CAUTERUCCI

Peter Thiel, Caitlyn Jenner, Milo YiannopoulosWhat Happens When Villains Become the Most Visible Queers?

KIMBERLY WILLIAMS

How Black Lives Matter Gave One Black, Queer Woman the Confidence to Be Visible in Appalachia

EVAN URQUHART

After Transitioning, I Want to Blend In. But My Lesbian Wife Still Wants to Be Out.

NATHANIEL FRANK

The Left Loves Visibility PoliticsEven When It Gets in the Way of Actual Progress

When Harvey Milk implored fellow gays in 1978 to come out, he argued that gay visibility would break down the myths and destroy the lies and distortions that undergird homophobic discrimination and violence. People who dont think they know any gay people find it easier to believe in a monolithic queerness that rests on stereotypes of amorality and sexual predation, the argument went. Such overtly hostile myths about gay people have dissipated a bit (at least for white and cisgender queers), but coming out in public is still a powerful way to add further humanity and depth to the mainstream understanding of queer life. Every time a person comes out, the public definition of queerness expands.

Queer representation in pop culture, though still sparse, is more widespread and diverse than its ever been. Weve got old-school butch Lea DeLaria acting alongside sexy newcomer Samira Wiley on a hit Netflix show in its fifth season, a Best Picturewinning depiction of the developing identity of one black gay man, and a genderqueer showrunner producing a series thats cast more transgender actors than weve ever had the privilege of watching onscreen. These famous LGBTQ faces, along with political trailblazers like Sarah McBride and Tammy Baldwin, have broadened the multiplicity of visible queer lives in America, giving members of the general public more data points to incorporate into their internal sketches of what a queer person is in 2017.

Gay villains serve a related purpose. Within the queer world, villains like Yiannopoulos and Thieland Caitlyn Jenner, another famous Trump supporter who has graciously excused the actions of transphobes on behalf of the LGBTQ communityare fantastic reminders of the ugliness that lies within our ranks, hidden by rainbow flags and an equality narrative based on love. Queers have staged protests at several recent Pride celebrations, demanding an end to the involvement of war profiteers, corporations that fund private prisons and oil pipelines, and police forces that disproportionately kill and harass LGBTQ people of color. They have been met with scorn and indignation from gay people who say the protests are too divisive and disruptive of a celebratory event. AIDS activist Mark S. King and famed ACT UP veteran Peter Staley have issued smart responses to those critiques, noting that a large segment of gays in the 80s resented ACT UP for being loud and inconvenient instead of acquiescing to respectability politics. Now, ACT UP activists are widely revered as heroes.

All of which is to say: The community is already divided, and everyone under the LGBTQ umbrella doesnt belong in the same political tent. There are gays who would rather cheer on cops and corporations than support their fellow queers in valid protest. There are gays who would rather safeguard their billion-dollar fortunes and embrace an admitted sexual predator than pick up the mantle of LGBTQ equality. There are gays who feel more affinity with straight, homophobic racists than with other gays.

The elevated public profiles of Yiannopoulos and Thiel have inspired difficult intra-community conversations that might not have otherwise arisen. When Out magazine gave Yiannopoulos a silly photoshoot and fluffy profile treatment last September, members of the LGBTQ media (including two Slate staffers) signed a petition opposing those who would sell out the community to promote toxicity for clicks and profits. When he said that lesbians are just needing a good dicking, he brought the misogyny thats often excused in gay male communities into bright daylight. When Thiel asked Who cares? about transgender bathroom accessits a distraction from ourreal problems, he saidit prompted some queers to question who gets included and who gets left out when prominent gays refer to the collective we, us, and our. Thiel may be more visible and easily reviled than most contemporary gays, but his anti-trans views are echoed by smaller-time villains, like executive producers of Pride celebrations, in our midst. Seeing evil gays on our TV screens makes it easier to believe that the threat doesnt just come from the likes of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory. Sometimes, the call is coming from inside the house.

This is a good lesson for straights to learn, too. I have long believed that women will not have achieved full gender equality until we make up half the worlds mass murderers and sex offenders. (Not that I would advocate for more mass murderers and sex offenders, but I do wish, kind of, that women made up a greater share.) If people believed women to be capable of terrible violence, they might believe us to be capable of everything elsethe presidency, for instance. Visible gay villains teach the world that queers arent all lovable Ellen DeGenereses, glamorous Laverne Coxes, sharp-witted Anderson Coopers, and goofy Neil Patrick Harrises. Equality means having the freedom and power to be just as fucked up and insufferable as anyone else.

Read the original here:

Queer Villains Remind Us That Gay Does Not Always Equal Good – Slate Magazine (blog)

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO Unveils DANGEROUS Billboard in Center of Media World


Former Breitbart Senior Editor MILO revealed a billboard for his book DANGEROUS just blocks from the offices of Simon & Schuster.

Go here to read the rest:
MILO Unveils DANGEROUS Billboard in Center of Media World

Fair Usage Law

June 27, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Book Party Moved After Being Booked as Gay … – Advocate.com

Milo Yiannopoulos has alienated any friends he might have had it by allaccounts has not been his day, his month, or even his year.

The scheduled Saturday launch party for theformer Breitbart editor and gay alt-right troll’s new book, Dangerous, had to relocated after the owner of the Jue Lan Club in New York City discovered the nature of the event.

Club owner Stratis Morfogen felt hosting Yiannopoulos would alienate his customers in the heavily LGBT Chelsea neighborhood. “I had no idea this was booked. It was told to us it was a gay pride event,” the restaurateur toldPage Six.

Although the event was not part of NYC Pride, it involved one particularly proud gay. “Angry, bitter leftistshave seized control over the Pride celebration and made it a political statement against President Trump,” said Yiannopoulos. “I am throwing a party for the outcasts, the rebels, and the gay conservatives who speak, think, and live free of liberal demands.”

Yiannopoulos’s publicist didn’t sing the same unapologetic tune. He kept the party’s new location a secret, tellingPage Six,”I don’t want to tell anyone. In New York there is no room for other opinions.”

Yiannopoulos, who is known for transphobic rhetoric and inciting his fans to make racist statements,wasdisinvited from the Conservative Political Action Conferencethis year after videos surfaced of him defending sex between men and underage boys, and then Simon & Schuster canceled his book deal. Dangerous is now being self-published and already has 65,000 preorders. It’s predicted that upon release, it will top best-seller lists.

View original post here:

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Book Party Moved After Being Booked as Gay … – Advocate.com

Fair Usage Law

June 27, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO’s ‘Coming Out Conservative’ Event Cancelled by Restaurant Following Protests


Former Breitbart Senior Editor Milo Yiannopoulos’ “Coming Out Conservative” event has been canceled by a restaurant following left-wing protests, prompting a change of venue.

Here is the original post:
MILO’s ‘Coming Out Conservative’ Event Cancelled by Restaurant Following Protests

Fair Usage Law

June 24, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Watch: Pamela Geller, Milo, Raheem Kassam and More Discuss The Islamic Jihad Against Free Speech in ‘Can’t We Talk About This?’

Can’t We Talk About This? The Islamic Jihad Against Free Speech is a shocking new film and follow-up video series detailing the concerted effort by international organizations to compel the U.S. and other Western countries to curtail freedom of speech and criminalize criticism of Islam. Featuring exclusive interviews with Pamela Geller, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Geert Wilders, Mark Steyn, Milo Yiannopolous, Raheem Kassam, Robert Spencer, Douglas Murray, Ezra Levant, Lars Vilks, Garland Muhammad cartoon contest winner Bosch Fawstin, and many other heroes of freedom, this web series will be the first ever to expose the war on free speech. It is certain to shock the American public and awaken many. These interviews reveal events at Garland and its aftermath that have never before been made public and demonstrate how far advanced the war on free speech really is. “In this film, we’re setting the record straight about our Garland free speech event, at which we were not only targeted by Islamic jihadis but apparently by the FBI as well,” Pamela Geller wrote at Breitbart News. “But we’re doing much more as well: we’re telling the whole, as-yet-untold truth about the war on free speech.” Breitbart readers can enter the code “BREITBART” to watch for

Fair Usage Law

September 10, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

My Worst Date: ‘He said Milo Yiannopoulos made some good points’ – iNews

I knew it was going to be a bad date when: he told me transgenderism shouldnt be normalised, the gender pay gap was a myth, Milo Yiannopoulos made some good points and Donald Trump was a better president than Hillary Clinton could ever be. It was our: second date We met: on Tinder When I challenged certain opinions, he mansplainedthat he had studiedsociology extensively so was more qualified to hold opinions on these subjects I thought he seemed: super charming and attentive on the first date, neverchecking his phone. We had a good connection, making jokes about Vladimir Putin and Kanye West. He offered to pay for dinner (I always pay half, but the gesture was nice), walked me to the bus stop, asked if he could hold my hand and then asked if he could steal a kiss. He got up from the table and announced he had to be sick in the toilets because he was hungover Date two was like being with a different person. He was late, moody and left it up to me to fill the awkward gaps in conversation. On the date: When I challenged certain opinions, he mansplainedthat he had studiedsociology extensively so was more qualified to hold opinions on these subjects. The more he relaxed and shared his personal and political views, the more uncomfortable I grew. The worst part was: when he got up from the table and announced he had to be sick in the toilets because he was quite badly hungover. The date ended when: I told him I had to work early the next morning so needed to leave. Afterwards, he sent me abusive messages telling me I had been a fucking waste of time’ After that: I messaged him and said while it was nice meeting him, I didnt think we were a good fit and it would be best not to see each other again. He was genuinely shocked. Over the next three days he sent me abusive messages telling me I had been a fucking waste of time. We had been talking through WhatsApp so when the abuse got too much and I blocked him, he switched to texting instead. I even apologised if I had hurt his feelings. That seemed to fuel the rage. If he got in touch today: I would praise the fact that technology has a block option. These days I am: single and relieved. In hindsight: it gives me a good story to tell on my next date. @kt_grant If you have a disastrous Worst Dateyoud like to get off your chest please email a brief synopsis of your experience to [emailprotected]

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Dangerous New Book Isn’t Even Worth Hating – Gizmodo

Former Breitbart tech editor Milo Yiannopoulos is scheduled to publish his book Dangerous next Tuesday, on Independence Day. Ahead of that release Gizmodo has obtained a copy of the finished book, as well as the January draft previously leaked to Buzzfeed. Maybe the most controversial book of the decade was intended as a career comeback, but it reads like an epitaph. Ugly as his beliefs may be, its inarguable that Milos built his career by knowing how to captivate an audience.By contrast, Dangerous is dreadfully dull. Beneath the regurgitated propaganda arguing against a fair, multicultural, egalitarian society is a portrait of an e-celebrity without an audience, a blogger without a publisher, and, above all, an attention-seeking troll whose playbook of goads no longer elicits any emotion whatsoever. To the detriment of the book, self-reflection is utterly absent. Originally, the book was to be published in mid-March by Simon & Schuster. But following the discovery of an interview in which Yiannopoulos appeared to condone pedophilia by referencing his own sexual experiences with older men at the age of 13, he offered an ignominious resignation from his position with Breitbart, was disinvited from CPAC where he was slated to be a keynote speaker, and was dropped by his publisher, all in short order. Disgraced, he later made clear his intentions to sue Simon & Schuster, though no such suit has materialized. With self-publishing his only remaining option, Yiannopoulos largely dropped out of the spotlight, presumably to finish writing Dangerous. Milos opus clocks in at just over 68,000 words when stripped of front and backmatter, although that number is closer to 63,000 due to his compulsive penchant for padding chapters with lengthy quotes, the origins of which range from Andrew Breitbart to Hannah Arendt to Gizmodo. In a statement to Buzzfeed, Milo claims the leaked draft had been substantially rewritten since [January]. Surprisingly, the prose does look to have been revamped somewhat. Theres a new introduction blithely titled So About That Whole Drama which addresses his disinvitation from CPAC and ensuing fall from disgrace; a subsection titled Milos College Rankings which lists a mere 16 higher learning institutions divided into two cliche tabloid-style categoriesHeroes and Zeroes; a few paragraphs now discuss the barely-remembered donglegate dustup from 2013. The substance of the book has remained largely unchanged in the six month interim. It remains a tedious and at times bitter self-defense written by a man who claims to enjoy the negative attention he sought out. In the parlance of Twittera platform Yiannopoulos hasnt been welcome on for nearly a yearDangerous is 275 pages of Im not owned! Im not owned! Just as was the case before, Dangerous gives away nothing of Yiannopouloss upbringing, his time at Breitbart, or scuffle with the Republican establishment which ruined him. Heres a smattering of the topics which Milo spent many months writing and rewriting: Is Pepe the frog a racist symbol? Was Twitter right to ban him? Why are feminists ignoring the plights of men? Is abortion wrong? Does rape culture exist? Is the one-in-four women statistic about sexual assault accurate? Are Muslims all terrible people? Is the Black Lives Matter movement full of shit? Should Brianna Wu, Anita Sarkeesian, and Zoe Quinn be grateful for their harassment by GamerGatea movement which hit its peak relevance nearly three years ago? Anyone with even a passing familiarity with Milos brand already knows his stances, which have been enunciated louder and more compellingly by other personalities in the right-wing mediaand debunked many times over. (Theyre also topics which Milo has already written about exhaustively in blog posts for Breitbart, which can be read for free.) Dangerous is not offensive, shocking, or thought-provoking. Had it met its original release date of mid-March, many of the topics contained within would still have felt well past their prime. Page after page recounting years-long grudges suggest that what he sees as the soft, identity-obsessed, participation award-craving liberals Milo makes his money riling up are the very same people whose affection and understanding he desperately craves. In his own words: People often accuse me of being an attention-seeker. Theyre right, of course. Milo also expends considerable ink griping about the lefts readiness to conflate right-leaning groups and misunderstand the language and tactics deployed by his former cohorts; meanwhile he fails to grasp and goes out of his way to undermine core concepts important to the Black Lives Matter movement, transgender people (whom he refers to as trannies), Muslims, and feminism, among others. Is it surprising to see bald hypocrisy in Dangerous? Of course not. But throughout he also refers to the political movement of which he was a figurehead as the alt-righta label which young, moderate conservatives still clinging to ideas espoused by Milo (and others) almost universally reject due to its association with white nationalism. One of the few cogent ideological threads that can be followed through the maze of petty grievances that is Dangerous is Milos enduring belief in the power of humor. Be twice as funny as you are outrageous, because no one can resist the truth wrapped in a good joke, he suggests, correctly, though the lesson manages to evade him. Attempts at humor in the book fall flat, not for being offensive, but for being either obvious or overly shrill. Perhaps knowing this, the line Im just too smart, too funny, too popular and too successful to ignore in the January draft is omitted, substituted by a humbler appeal to the content of his character: Im not the best because Im the funniest or the smartest or the most attractive person among conservative and libertarian celebrities. Im the best because I work harder than everyone else. Likewise the subsection Why Im So Great no longer appears in the finished product. In the course of trying (and failing) to insult anyone and everyone, Yiannopoulos manages to liken himself to a diverse cast of characters both real and fictional that include Oscar Wilde, Freddy Mercury, Nigel Farage, Martin Luther King Jr., Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and the raptors in Jurassic Park. But the toning down of his characters signature egotism manages to make the book all the duller. Its a shame he lacked the conviction to fully inhabit the character now that its his own money on the line rather than Simon & Schusters. Part and parcel to Milos affinity to abuse quotes like a high school student desperate to hit a page count, Dangerous is nothing if not an attempt to ingratiate himself back into any group who will have him. Positive name-drops include Ann Coulter, PayPal founder Peter Thiel, Fox Newss Tucker Carlson, Rebel Medias Lauren Southern, Lucian Wintrich of The Gateway Pundit, YouTube personalities Stephan Molyneux and Daniel Keem, James OKeefe of Project Veritas infamy, and Trump advisor and former boss Steve Bannon. (The former two even submitted blurbs for the book jacket.) And of course, Trump himself, whom he frequently refers to as daddy. But there are appearances to keep up, and Milo couches his subtextual contrition/job hunt with any opportunity to flaunt his credentials as a rebellious anti-establishment type, including a few toothless warnings to his own: Like the Lefts political correctness, the Rights political correctness is collectivist and reductive in its logic. It will destroy the lives of innocent people if it goes unchecked. We must fight against it until it dies. The majority of the bile Yiannopoulos spits towards the rightwing is directed at old-guard Republicans, embodiments of a rigged system. Had he stuck by what few principles he has and declined the invitation to speak at CPACwhich managed to tarnish his reputation in a way the media simply couldnthis 15 minutes of fame might well have extended into a legitimate political career. All memes die. Its a fact of the internet Milo inhabits. And Milo, the memetic avatar designed to drive oversensitive liberals into apoplectic rage, has reached the end of its internet shelf life. His schtick has been done better by others, and the reactionary cruelty which elicited horror now only registers as a grating hum. Ironically, in helping elect Trump, Milo and those like him made themselves obsolete: America now faces greater problems than the mean-spirited shitposts of a preening hack.

Fair Usage Law

June 29, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s self-published book is all about how mean everyone is to him – Quartz

Milo Yiannopoulos doesnt care. He doesnt care that the mainstream media hates him, that the alt-right hates him, that feminists hate him. Hes so over it that hes written 250 pages devoted entirely to the various parties who vilify him. Dangerous, the autobiography by the former Breitbart editor and proud internet troll, will be released on July 4. Originally set for a March debut, the book was dropped by Simon & Schuster in February after an interview with Yiannopoulos surfaced in which he appeared to brush off pedophilia. Now Yiannopoulos is self-publishing Dangerous, which has been hovering in the top 20 books on Amazon this month. Based on its first 50 pages (provided to Quartz by a publicist for Yiannopoulos), Dangerous is not so much filled with the authors patented hate-speech, as early critics anticipated, as it is with his hate for the mainstream media and the left. Most of all, though, the book is about the worlds hate for the man who has referred to Islam as AIDS and feminism as cancer. Yiannopoulos begins the book by addressing the controversy that cost him his deal with Simon & Schuster, plainly stating that he doesnt condone pedophilia or hebephilia. He calls himself a victim of sexual abuse, but then writes: The only way I can truly be a victim is to wallow in what happened and let it define me. If youre reading this, and you have been abused, and you are wallowing, I will give you the most important piece of advice I have: get over it. Move on. He adds, There are real victims out there, and together, you and I are going to fight for them. Were going to do so without self-pity, without a cult of victimhood, and certainly without safe spaces. Despite his distaste for victimhood, Yiannopoulos does a lot to paint himself as a victima fabulous but misunderstood personality relentlessly targeted by the media and the political left. The excerpt provided by Yiannopouloss publicist includes three separate introductions and the first two chapters are titled Why the Progressive Left Hates Me and Why the Alt-Right Hates Me. The remaining chapters are named for other groups that reportedly hate the author, including feminists, Black Lives Matter, the media, establishment gays, and Muslims. One exception to the convention is a chapter on gamers, who do not, apparently, hate Yiannopoulos. He goes on to inform his readers that they are victims of a cultural elite. He writes that the movie 10 Years a Slave (sicits actually 12) is proof that a kind white man has no place in popular culture. White men cant dance, jump or sexually satisfy their partners, he writes. These are all socially acceptable jokes. The book reads largely as a defense of Yiannopouloss unabashed brand of conservative contempt and scorn for the press. His mandate to his readers is [fight] for your right to speak freely, honestly, and rudely, no matter who doesnt like it. For those readers already turned onto his particular venom, the book could work. He makes a compelling appeal to people (namely straight white men) who feel left out of what he calls a league table of oppression. Hes also deeply critical of college campus culture, writing: The practitioners of the new political correctness are not equipped for a world in which individuals can disagree with what is deemed appropriate thought. They rely on silencing the opposition with hysterics, instead of winning with superior ideas. Purposefully or unwittingly, a generation of Americans now exists that is terrified of critical thinking. Of course what the author does not offer, at least in these 50 pages, is how to achieve that level of open discourse through saying whatever one wants at whatever time. Though he writes that the art of trolling lies in debunking some untruth or exposing wrongdoing or hypocrisy, its not clear how he has elevated the level of critical thinking. Its likewise unclear how calling actor Leslie Jones a barely literate black dude passes for debunking. What Yiannopoulos has missed is that belligerence itself is not a superior idea.

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Restaurant Cancels Milo Yiannopoulos’ Book Release Party – Out Magazine

Milo Yiannopoulos has learned that it isnt easy to find a New York venue to host a party promoting his new bookespecially Saturday night of Pride Week. The outspoken, alt-right commentator allegedly misrepresented his party as a pride event to secure his first-choice venue Jue Lan Club, a dim sum restaurant in the LGBTQ-friendly Chelsea neighborhood. When the owner discovered Yiannopouloss deception, he canceled the reservation. I had no idea this was booked, Stratis Morfogen, proprietor of Jue Lan Club, told Page Six. It was told to us it was a gay pride event. We don’t get involved or take sides with politics, religion, etc.” While the party went ahead at another venue, Yiannopoulos took to his website to blame liberals who he believed pressured his first choice into canceling the event. Angry, bitter leftists have seized control over the Pride celebration and made it a political statement against President Trump, Yiannopoulos said. Yiannopouloss inflammatory remarks have placed him increasingly at odds with the mainstream public. In February, UC Berkley canceled a speaking engagement with the alt-right spokesperson after protests erupted on the campus. Shortly afterwards, Simon & Schuster, the original publishers of Dangerous, dropped Yiannopoulos after he gave an interview in which he appeared to make light of pedophilia.

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Queer Villains Remind Us That Gay Does Not Always Equal Good – Slate Magazine (blog)

Milo Yiannopoulos waits to speak at an Alt Right protest of Muslim activist Linda Sarsour on April 25, 2017 in New York City. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images Say what you will about 2016that it was a reeking dumpster fire, maybe, or a malfunctioning computer that needed to be turned off and rebootedbut the year thrust a few magnificent villains into the spotlight. There was Peter Thiel, a dead-eyed billionaire who called his bid to a help a racist millionaire destroy a news outlet philanthropic, and who didnt exactly not say hed suck teen blood for immortality. We also got Milo Yiannopoulos, a Nazi-sympathizing bizarro Ken doll with a British accent and a talent for turning the internets latent undercurrents of hate into waves of violent threats. These men are more than just bad actors on the national stage: They seek influence and use it for evil means, then show no remorse. They are comic booklevel villains. And they also happen to be two of the most visible gay men in America. Neither Thiels gayness nor Yiannopoulos are incidental to their rise to infamy. Dangerous Faggot is Yiannopoulos preferred moniker and the name of his controversy-ridden campus speaking tour. PayPal co-founder Thiel was barely known outside Silicon Valley until he funneled millions of dollars into Hulk Hogans lawsuit against Gawker, which successfully sunk the news site. He had no connection to Hogan, a known homophobe. But Gawker had once written a blog post about Thiels sexuality, and though Thiel was already out at the time, he claimed to be a victim of the sites bullying. In other words, his fame stemmed directly from his sexuality. These men are not closeted or quietly gay homosexuals: They are here, they are queer, and they would probably object to my use of that term, associated as it is with the kind of pan-LGBTQ identity politics both despise. And yet, these gay villains were called upon to foreground their queerdom in their shared fight to elect Donald Trump. Each had his part to play. Yiannopoulos further inflamed the festering staph infection that is Breitbart News and helped equate racist, sexist, and xenophobic harassment with acceptable public discourse. Thiel poured at least $1.25 million into Trumps campaign and spoke in Trumps support at the Republican National Convention. In that address, Thiel both highlighted and downplayed his quasi-historic speaking slot. I am proud to be gay, Thiel said. But also, LGBTQ rights are the focus of fake culture wars that only distract us from oureconomic decline. Drew Angerer/Getty Images Yiannopoulos, meanwhile, became a go-to voice of the alt-right, which helped make white men scared for their own supremacy. He encouraged them get their anger out by bashing black actresses just for being black and female, and by voting for a man who seemed to hate women and immigrants as much as they did. Because he is gay, Yiannopoulos was able to appoint himself a leather-clad, popper-sniffing best friend who gives straight bigots permission to call progressive queer people faggots and use the phrase thats so gay as an insult. Thiel and Yiannopoulos are palatable to the right wing because theyre white, male, and ideological extremists, but their villainy is enhanced, not mitigated, by their queerness. Their endorsement of a party that works at every turn to impede the rights of LGBTQ people allows straight conservatives to badmouth queers and feel justified because a gay told them it was OK. LEO CALDWELL Increasing Trans Visibility Has a Downside: Pressure to Conform to Conventional Beauty Ideals CHRISTINA CAUTERUCCI Peter Thiel, Caitlyn Jenner, Milo YiannopoulosWhat Happens When Villains Become the Most Visible Queers? KIMBERLY WILLIAMS How Black Lives Matter Gave One Black, Queer Woman the Confidence to Be Visible in Appalachia EVAN URQUHART After Transitioning, I Want to Blend In. But My Lesbian Wife Still Wants to Be Out. NATHANIEL FRANK The Left Loves Visibility PoliticsEven When It Gets in the Way of Actual Progress When Harvey Milk implored fellow gays in 1978 to come out, he argued that gay visibility would break down the myths and destroy the lies and distortions that undergird homophobic discrimination and violence. People who dont think they know any gay people find it easier to believe in a monolithic queerness that rests on stereotypes of amorality and sexual predation, the argument went. Such overtly hostile myths about gay people have dissipated a bit (at least for white and cisgender queers), but coming out in public is still a powerful way to add further humanity and depth to the mainstream understanding of queer life. Every time a person comes out, the public definition of queerness expands. Queer representation in pop culture, though still sparse, is more widespread and diverse than its ever been. Weve got old-school butch Lea DeLaria acting alongside sexy newcomer Samira Wiley on a hit Netflix show in its fifth season, a Best Picturewinning depiction of the developing identity of one black gay man, and a genderqueer showrunner producing a series thats cast more transgender actors than weve ever had the privilege of watching onscreen. These famous LGBTQ faces, along with political trailblazers like Sarah McBride and Tammy Baldwin, have broadened the multiplicity of visible queer lives in America, giving members of the general public more data points to incorporate into their internal sketches of what a queer person is in 2017. Gay villains serve a related purpose. Within the queer world, villains like Yiannopoulos and Thieland Caitlyn Jenner, another famous Trump supporter who has graciously excused the actions of transphobes on behalf of the LGBTQ communityare fantastic reminders of the ugliness that lies within our ranks, hidden by rainbow flags and an equality narrative based on love. Queers have staged protests at several recent Pride celebrations, demanding an end to the involvement of war profiteers, corporations that fund private prisons and oil pipelines, and police forces that disproportionately kill and harass LGBTQ people of color. They have been met with scorn and indignation from gay people who say the protests are too divisive and disruptive of a celebratory event. AIDS activist Mark S. King and famed ACT UP veteran Peter Staley have issued smart responses to those critiques, noting that a large segment of gays in the 80s resented ACT UP for being loud and inconvenient instead of acquiescing to respectability politics. Now, ACT UP activists are widely revered as heroes. All of which is to say: The community is already divided, and everyone under the LGBTQ umbrella doesnt belong in the same political tent. There are gays who would rather cheer on cops and corporations than support their fellow queers in valid protest. There are gays who would rather safeguard their billion-dollar fortunes and embrace an admitted sexual predator than pick up the mantle of LGBTQ equality. There are gays who feel more affinity with straight, homophobic racists than with other gays. The elevated public profiles of Yiannopoulos and Thiel have inspired difficult intra-community conversations that might not have otherwise arisen. When Out magazine gave Yiannopoulos a silly photoshoot and fluffy profile treatment last September, members of the LGBTQ media (including two Slate staffers) signed a petition opposing those who would sell out the community to promote toxicity for clicks and profits. When he said that lesbians are just needing a good dicking, he brought the misogyny thats often excused in gay male communities into bright daylight. When Thiel asked Who cares? about transgender bathroom accessits a distraction from ourreal problems, he saidit prompted some queers to question who gets included and who gets left out when prominent gays refer to the collective we, us, and our. Thiel may be more visible and easily reviled than most contemporary gays, but his anti-trans views are echoed by smaller-time villains, like executive producers of Pride celebrations, in our midst. Seeing evil gays on our TV screens makes it easier to believe that the threat doesnt just come from the likes of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory. Sometimes, the call is coming from inside the house. This is a good lesson for straights to learn, too. I have long believed that women will not have achieved full gender equality until we make up half the worlds mass murderers and sex offenders. (Not that I would advocate for more mass murderers and sex offenders, but I do wish, kind of, that women made up a greater share.) If people believed women to be capable of terrible violence, they might believe us to be capable of everything elsethe presidency, for instance. Visible gay villains teach the world that queers arent all lovable Ellen DeGenereses, glamorous Laverne Coxes, sharp-witted Anderson Coopers, and goofy Neil Patrick Harrises. Equality means having the freedom and power to be just as fucked up and insufferable as anyone else.

Fair Usage Law

June 28, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO Unveils DANGEROUS Billboard in Center of Media World

Former Breitbart Senior Editor MILO revealed a billboard for his book DANGEROUS just blocks from the offices of Simon & Schuster.

Fair Usage Law

June 27, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

Milo Yiannopoulos’s Book Party Moved After Being Booked as Gay … – Advocate.com

Milo Yiannopoulos has alienated any friends he might have had it by allaccounts has not been his day, his month, or even his year. The scheduled Saturday launch party for theformer Breitbart editor and gay alt-right troll’s new book, Dangerous, had to relocated after the owner of the Jue Lan Club in New York City discovered the nature of the event. Club owner Stratis Morfogen felt hosting Yiannopoulos would alienate his customers in the heavily LGBT Chelsea neighborhood. “I had no idea this was booked. It was told to us it was a gay pride event,” the restaurateur toldPage Six. Although the event was not part of NYC Pride, it involved one particularly proud gay. “Angry, bitter leftistshave seized control over the Pride celebration and made it a political statement against President Trump,” said Yiannopoulos. “I am throwing a party for the outcasts, the rebels, and the gay conservatives who speak, think, and live free of liberal demands.” Yiannopoulos’s publicist didn’t sing the same unapologetic tune. He kept the party’s new location a secret, tellingPage Six,”I don’t want to tell anyone. In New York there is no room for other opinions.” Yiannopoulos, who is known for transphobic rhetoric and inciting his fans to make racist statements,wasdisinvited from the Conservative Political Action Conferencethis year after videos surfaced of him defending sex between men and underage boys, and then Simon & Schuster canceled his book deal. Dangerous is now being self-published and already has 65,000 preorders. It’s predicted that upon release, it will top best-seller lists.

Fair Usage Law

June 27, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed

MILO’s ‘Coming Out Conservative’ Event Cancelled by Restaurant Following Protests

Former Breitbart Senior Editor Milo Yiannopoulos’ “Coming Out Conservative” event has been canceled by a restaurant following left-wing protests, prompting a change of venue.

Fair Usage Law

June 24, 2017   Posted in: Milo Yiannopoulos  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."