Archive for the ‘Morris Dees’ Category

Dogs squeeze past Dees

By Emma QuayleMay 10, 2014, 10:46 p.m. Western Bulldogs emerge victorious in a war of attrition against Melbourne, winning by 16 points. Melbourne v Western Bulldogs AFL MCG , round 8 , Robert Murphy kicks in front of Jay Kennedy-Harris Photo: Pat Scala Bulldog Robert Murphy kicks ahead as Demon Jay Kennedy-Harris gives chase. Photo: Pat Scala WESTERN BULLDOGS 3.2 5.7 9.7 15.9 (99)MELBOURNE 2.2 5.5 10.6 12.11 (83) Goals: Western Bulldogs: S Crameri 4 T Williams 3 J Tutt 2 T Liberatore 2 A Cooney D Giansiracusa R Griffen W Minson. Melbourne: D Tyson 2 J Frawley 2 J Kennedy-Harris 2 B Vince C Dawes C Pedersen C Salem D Cross M Jamar. BEST Western Bulldogs: Liberatore, Griffen, Crameri, Cooney, Williams, Dahlhaus, Wood, Johannissen Melbourne: Tyson, Cross, Watts, Jones, Dawes, Viney, Howe, Bail, Vince, Jetta, Kennedy-Harris Umpires: Matt Stevic, Craig Fleer, Andrew Stephens. Official Crowd: 36,326 at the MCG. It had been a little while since either Melbourne or the Western Bulldogs had the chance to be these things: more proactive, more aggressive, more creative. To be the team that showed the other team how it wanted the game to be played. That there were 20 ball-ups and 11 throw ins in the first 15 minutes suggested both sides had to suss the other one out, before it tried anything else. That there were almost as many clangers indicated they had other things to sort out, too. It was the story of the first half. When the Western Bulldogs had half chances, they took most of them. Or many, at least. Adam Cooney had about half a metre in which to move when he slid the games first goal through from beside the boundary. All Stewart Crameri had to do was stay standing when he grabbed the ball a few metres from the goal square midway through the first term: in his desperation to tackle, Lynden Dunn actually spun his snapping opponent in line with the goals. Later, they were able to hold onto their (narrow) half-time lead because Lachie Hunter urged a handball just past the 50-metre line, breaking a long run of Melbourne inside 50s and placing it at the feet of Tom Williams, who picked the ball up, turned and kicked quickly through the goals. The problem for the Dogs was that they didnt make enough of their easier, more definite opportunities. Kicking was a problem for both sides early, but where the Bulldogs made some horrible mistakes, and the Demons were running at 55 per cent efficiency for a while, their worst mistakes were made with their last kicks, not quite finding who or what they wanted moving inside 50. They kept kicking and, with time, they sorted themselves out. Around the ball, Dom Tyson, Nathan Jones, Jack Viney and Daniel Cross began to dig more balls out, often through a quick kick themselves. Almost everyone ran harder, finding more space. Almost everyone started to find their (much clearer) teammates. In Chris Dawes, they had someone to aim for. But if he wasnt there the Demons were willing to flick the ball back, and around, until they were open. They played with patience.


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May 11, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Western Bulldogs run down Melbourne in MCG thriller

MELBOURNE: 2.2, 5.5, 10.6, 12.11 (83) WESTERN BULLDOGS: 3.2, 5.7, 9.7, 15.9 (99) GOALS Melbourne: Kennedy-Harris 2, Frawley 2, Jamar, Pedersen, Vince, Cross, Tyson, Dawes, Salem, Tyson Western Bulldogs: Crameri 4, Williams 3, Liberatore 2, Tutt 2, Cooney, Minson, Giansiracusa, Griffen BEST Melbourne: Tyson, Jones, Frawley, Jamar, Cross, Viney, Vince Western Bulldogs: Liberatore, Minson, Williams, Crameri, Cooney INJURIES Melbourne: Terlich (concussion), Frawley (TBC) Western Bulldogs: Dickson (shoulder), Williams (calf), Crameri (shoulder) What Happened These two sides played out an unlikely classic, is what happened! In a match that had everything from lead changes to incredible bravery to big hits to some classy attacking play, the Western Bulldogs ultimately proved too good as they came from behind to win 15.9 (99) to 12.11 (83). In a match that featured eight lead changes during the second half, the Bulldogs showed their class with a six-goal-to-two final term as they snapped a three-game losing streak with a hard-fought win on Saturday night at the MCG. The victory will probably come at a cost, though, as Liam Jones looks like spending several weeks on the sidelines for a big hit on Dean Terlich during the third quarter, one that left the Melbourne defender motionless on the turf for several minutes. Terlich was subbed off with concussion and didn’t appear again and Jones is facing a short holiday. There are injury concerns for the Dogs too as Tom Williams hurt his calf just before half-time but bravely stayed on the field to score three goals. Adding to the Dogs’ problems, Stewart Crameri suffered a shoulder issue late in the game but stayed on to score two of the last three goals. Tory Dickson was also subbed out late in the second quarter with a shoulder issue, although the Dogs immediately regretted the move as Williams pulled up hurt just moments after the sub Daniel Giansiracusa was activated. Despite the pain, the brave Williams stayed on the park to lead the charge in a dramatic final term as he scored a spectacular goal on the run to set the tone for the Dogs’ last quarter charge.


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May 11, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

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May 5, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Morris Dees: Fighting Frazier Glenn Miller and the KKK – Video




Morris Dees: Fighting Frazier Glenn Miller and the KKK 1986 CBS West 57th newsmagazine featuring Morris Dees and the SPLC's work to shut down hate groups. By: SPLCenter

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April 27, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Suspected Kansas City JCC shooter receives month-long delay from court

Frazier Glenn Cross Jr, also known as Glenn Miller, in a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session in Olathe, Kans., on April 24. Photo by John Sleezer/The Kansas City Star/Reuters The suspect in the shootings of three people at two Jewish institutions in suburban Kansas City appeared in court and asked for a month-long delay in the proceedings. Frazier Glenn Miller, who also goes by the name Frazier Glenn Cross, appeared before Johnson County District Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan on Thursday. The judge agreed to set the next hearing for May 29. Cross has not yet entered a plea and is being held in jail on a $10 million bond. He appeared in court wearing his orange prison jumpsuit and sitting in a wheelchair. Miller is suspected of killing William Lewis Corporon, a retired physician, and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Griffin Underwood, in the parking lot of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City in Overland Park, Kan., and then shooting to death Terri LaManno, a Catholic mother of two, in the parking lot at Village Shalom, a Jewish assisted-living facility a few blocks away, where she was visiting her mother. None of the three victims were Jewish. The Southern Poverty Law Center was the first to identify the gunman as Miller, of Aurora, Mo. It said he was the grand dragon of the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1980s and subsequently a founder of the White Patriot Party. The center said he served three years in prison on weapons charges and for plotting the assassination of its founder, Morris Dees. ABC reported Thursday that Cross was given that name and a new Social Security number and place to live in 1990, when he was released from prison. The purpose reportedly was to separate him from his White Supremacist past. We welcome your feedback. Your information will not be shared or sold without your consent. Get all the details.


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April 25, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Tant: Extremists pervert their religion

"Heil Hitler!" shouted the sick and sad old man handcuffed in the back seat of a police car. Frazier Glenn Miller had just been arrested for gunning down three people outside a Jewish community center and a Jewish retirement home in Overland Park, Kan.


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April 20, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Amy Goodman: U.S. should wake up to white supremacist threat

Another U.S. shooting spree has left bullet-riddled bodies in its wake, and refocused attention on violent, right-wing extremists. Frazier Glenn Miller, a former leader of a wing of the Ku Klux Klan, is accused of killing three people outside two Jewish community centers outside Kansas City, Kan. As he was hauled away in a police car, he shouted “Heil Hitler!” Unlike Islamic groups that U.S. agencies spend tens of billions of dollars targeting, domestic white supremacist groups enjoy relative freedom to spew their hatred and promote racist ideology. Too often, their murderous rampages are viewed as acts of deranged “lone wolf” attackers. These seemingly fringe groups are actually well-organized, interconnected and are enjoying renewed popularity. In April 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security released a study on right-wing extremists in the United States. The 10-page report included findings like: “The economic downturn and the election of the first African-American president present unique drivers for right-wing radicalization and recruitment.” It controversially suggested military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan could potentially be recruited to join hate groups. The report provoked a firestorm of criticism, especially from veterans groups. The Obama administration was just months old, and newly appointed Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano withdrew the report, apologizing for it during a congressional budget hearing. Mark Potok is a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which has been tracking right-wing hate groups and Frazier Glenn Miller for years. Potok said, about that report, “a real problem with the Department of Homeland Security … ever since a particular report on the right wing was leaked to the press in April of 2009, DHS has sort of cowered. They essentially gutted their non-Islamic domestic terrorism unit.” The SPLC was co-founded in 1971 by civil rights lawyer Morris Dees. It began suing white supremacist groups in the 1980s, representing clients that the groups threatened, beat and harassed. Potok described Frazier Glenn Miller as “one of the best-known white supremacist activists in the country for a very long time … active for more than 40 years in the movement. He joined, as a very young teenager, things like the National States’ Rights Party, a descendant of the American Nazi Party.” Miller formed his own wing of the Klan, which marched publicly in military fatigues. He had dealings with another supremacist group, The Order, that gave him $200,000 from the more than $4 million stolen through bank robberies and armored-car holdups. After being sued by the SPLC, Frazier Glenn Miller agreed to a settlement in one case, but violated the terms of the agreement and was found guilty of criminal contempt. While out on bond, he disappeared, issuing a crudely typed “Declaration of War,” specifically targeting Morris Dees for murder. He was eventually arrested. Potok told me, “He was initially charged with conspiracy, very serious charges, in 1987 that could have sent him to prison for 20 or 30 years. But he cut a deal with the federal government and agreed to testify … against his comrades. That wound up meaning a mere five-year sentence for him, and he served only three years.” Miller cooperated with federal prosecutors, testifying against 13 white supremacist leaders. He was released from prison and was assisted, it is believed, by the Federal Witness Protection Program as he relocated to Nebraska and changed his last name to “Cross.” Frazier Glenn Miller, also known as Frazier Glenn Cross, lost credibility with other white supremacists and faded into relative obscurity. He occasionally ran for office in Missouri, after running virulently racist campaign ads on radio. Then he went on his murderous rampage this week. “Perhaps if he had been in prison all those years rather than a witness in this trial,” Potok reflected, “we wouldn’t have experienced what we saw in Kansas City the other day.” Potok and the SPLC track the recent rise of right-wing hate groups. When I asked him about the FBI’s focus on animal rights and environmental groups, he replied, “The idea that eco-terrorists, so-called, are the major domestic terror threat, which was in fact said to Congress a couple of times by FBI leaders during the Bush years, I think is just patently ludicrous … no one has been killed by anyone in the radical animal rights movement or the radical environmentalist movement.” The SPLC will soon release a report that links registered members of two prominent white supremacist online forums to more than 100 murders in the United States in just the past five years. While law-abiding Muslims are forced to hide in their homes, and animal rights activists are labeled as terrorists for undercover filming of abusive treatment at factory farms, right-wing hate groups are free to organize, parade, arm themselves to the hilt and murder with chilling regularity. It’s time for our society to confront this very real threat. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America, including WORT here. Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column.


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April 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

The racist threat from the right -

Another U.S. shooting spree has left bullet-riddled bodies in its wake, and refocused attention on violent, right-wing extremists. Frazier Glenn Miller, a former leader of a wing of the Ku Klux Klan, is accused of killing three people outside two Jewish community centers outside Kansas City, Kan. As he was hauled away in a police car, he shouted Heil Hitler! Unlike Islamic groups that U.S. agencies spend tens of billions of dollars targeting, domestic white supremacist groups enjoy relative freedom to spew their hatred and promote racist ideology. Too often, their murderous rampages are viewed as acts of deranged lone wolf attackers. These seemingly fringe groups are actually well-organized, interconnected and are enjoying renewed popularity. In April 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security released a study on right-wing extremists in the United States. The 10-page report included findings like The economic downturn and the election of the first African American president present unique drivers for rightwing radicalization and recruitment. It controversially suggested military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan could potentially be recruited to join hate groups. The report provoked a firestorm of criticism, especially from veterans groups. The Obama administration was just months old, and newly appointed Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano withdrew the report, apologizing for it during a congressional budget hearing. Mark Potok is a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which has been tracking right-wing hate groups for years. Potok said, about that report, a real problem with the Department of Homeland Security ever since a particular report on the right wing was leaked to the press in April of 2009, DHS has sort of cowered. They essentially gutted their non-Islamic domestic terrorism unit. The center was co-founded in 1971 by civil-rights lawyer Morris Dees. It began suing white supremacist groups in the 1980s, representing clients that the groups threatened, beat and harassed. Potok described Frazier Glenn Miller as one of the best-known white supremacist activists in the country for a very long time active for more than 40 years in the movement. He joined, as a very young teenager, things like the National States Rights Party, a descendent of the American Nazi Party. Miller formed his own wing of the Klan, which marched publicly in military fatigues. He had dealings with another supremacist group, The Order, that gave him $200,000 from the more than $4 million stolen through bank robberies and armored-car holdups. After being sued by the SPLC, Frazier Glenn Miller agreed to a settlement in one case, but violated the terms of the agreement and was found guilty of criminal contempt. While out on bond, he disappeared, issuing a crudely typed Declaration of War, specifically targeting Morris Dees for murder. He was eventually arrested. Miller cooperated with federal prosecutors, testifying against 13 white supremacist leaders. He was released from prison and was assisted, it is believed, by the Federal Witness Protection Program as he relocated to Nebraska and changed his last name to Cross. Frazier Glenn Miller, also known as Frazier Glenn Cross, lost credibility with other white supremacists and faded into relative obscurity. Then he went on his murderous rampage. Potok and the center track the recent rise of right-wing hate groups. When I asked him about the FBIs focus on animal rights and environmental groups, he replied, The idea that eco-terrorists, so-called, are the major domestic terror threat, which was in fact said to Congress a couple of times by FBI leaders during the Bush years, I think is just patently ludicrous no one has been killed by anyone in the radical animal-rights movement or the radical environmentalist movement. The SPLC will soon release a report that links registered members of two prominent white supremacist online forums to more than 100 murders in the United States in just the past five years. Its time for our society to confront this very real threat. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,200 stations in North America.


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April 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

The Joy of Six: remarkable solo performances

Russell Jackson: From a marathon innings to an LSD-fuelled pitcher, our pick of individual efforts in sport Russell Jackson


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April 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Can ethnic hate be a mental illness?

In early April, the Anti-Defamation League offered some happy news about a very grim topic. It reported a significant and encouraging decline in anti-Semitic acts across America in recent years. Unfortunately, the new spirit of hope would not last long. Less than two weeks passed before a hate-motivated killing of three innocent people in Overland Park, Kan., on the Sunday before Passover. Police have charged Frazier Glenn Miller, also known as Frazier Cross, a white supremacist from southwest Missouri with fatally shooting three people including a 14-year-old boy on Sunday, a day before Passover outside a Jewish community center and a Jewish senior center. Despite the location and Millers long-espoused hatred of Jews, it turned out that all three of his victims were Christian. That irony only symbolizes how inevitably the hatred that is directed at some of us spills over to threaten all of us. It also revives a long-brewing question that psychiatrists and psychologists have raised in recent years: Could extreme racial and ethic bigotry be in itself a form of mental illness? After all, its easy to label someone as crazy or some other more clinical-sounding term after they have embarked on a shooting rampage. Yet it is remarkable how accustomed we are to rational-sounding nonviolent bigots. At 73, Miller had been working the big-time bigotry circuit at least since he was kicked out of the Army in 1979 after serving in the Green Berets and two tours in Vietnam. He was discharged for distributing racist literature, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, a leading monitor of hate groups. He formed the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, led numerous public rallies and had a variety of run-ins with the law. Among other offenses he served three years in federal prison for weapons charges, plotting robberies and calling for the assassination of the SPLCs founder Morris Dees. Yet, Heidi Beirich, director of the SPLCs Intelligence Project who interviewed Miller, told the New York Times that he seemed to have settled into a quiet life of posting nasty vitriol on his website. On the one hand, Im a little surprised, she said. On the other hand, how can you be surprised when a guy whos spent his life saying the Jews should be killed decides to go kill Jews? How, indeed? Cases like Millers raise troubling questions about whats going on in the heads of people who become obsessed with racist, anti-Semitic and other bigoted philosophies. In 2012, The Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders included a new chapter on identifying and assessing pathological bias, an extreme prejudice that could lead supremacists to commit random violence against another race. Co-authoring that study was Dr. Carl C. Bell of the University of Illinois at Chicago, who has called for further study of racism as a personality disorder.


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April 19, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Clarence Page: Exploring 'pathological bias'

In early April, the Anti-Defamation League offered some happy news about a very grim topic. It reported a significant and encouraging decline in anti-Semitic acts across America in recent years. Unfortunately, the new spirit of hope would not last long. Less than two weeks passed before a hate-motivated killing of three innocent people in Overland Park, Kan., on the Sunday before Passover. Police have charged Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, a white supremacist from Southwest Missouri, with fatally shooting three people including a 14-year-old boy on Sunday outside a Jewish community center and a Jewish retirement complex. Despite the location and Cross long-espoused hatred of Jews, it turned out that all three of his victims were Christian. That irony only symbolizes how inevitably the hatred that is directed at some of us spills over to threaten all of us. It also revives a long-brewing question that psychiatrists and psychologists have raised in recent years: Could extreme racial and ethnic bigotry be in itself a form of mental illness? After all, its easy to label someone as crazy or some other more clinical-sounding term after he has embarked on a shooting rampage. Yet it is remarkable how accustomed we are to rational-sounding nonviolent bigots. Cross, 73, had been working the big-time bigotry circuit at least since he was kicked out of the Army in 1979 after serving in the Green Berets and two tours in Vietnam. He was discharged for distributing racist literature, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, a leading monitor of hate groups. He formed the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, led numerous public rallies and had a variety of run-ins with the law. Among other offenses, he served three years in federal prison for weapons charges, plotting robberies and calling for the assassination of the SPLCs founder Morris Dees. Yet Heidi Beirich, director of the SPLCs Intelligence Project who interviewed Cross, told The New York Times that he seemed to have settled into a quiet life of posting nasty vitriol on his website. On the one hand, Im a little surprised, she said. On the other hand, how can you be surprised when a guy whos spent his life saying the Jews should be killed decides to go kill Jews? How, indeed? Cases like Cross raise troubling questions about whats going on in the heads of people who become obsessed with racist, anti-Semitic and other bigoted philosophies. In 2012, The Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders included a new chapter on identifying and assessing pathological bias, an extreme prejudice that could lead supremacists to commit random violence against another race. Co-authoring that study was Dr. Carl C. Bell of the University of Illinois at Chicago, who has called for further study of racism as a personality disorder.


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April 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Suspect in court wearing suicide smock

STORY HIGHLIGHTS Overland Park, Kansas (CNN) — The man accused of killing three people at two Jewish-affiliated facilities in Kansas made no secret of his racist views, writing letters to newspapers and inviting people to white-supremacist meetings at his home, say those who knew him. So when news broke that Frazier Glenn Cross had been charged with one count of capital murder and one count of first-degree premeditated murder in connection with the killings, it didn’t come as a surprise to the mayor of Marionville, Missouri. “It was kind of shocking at first. But then reading the article and thinking about it, I thought ‘yeah that sounds like something he would do,’” said Dan Clevenger, who has known Cross for 12 years, describing him as a client at his business where he services law mowers and other small engines. Cross is accused of shooting to death a boy and his grandfather outside a Jewish community center near Kansas City, Kansas, on Sunday and then a woman at a nearby Jewish assisted living facility. Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb


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April 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Morris Dees: Fighting the KKK – Video




Morris Dees: Fighting the KKK West 57th story produced in the 1980's documenting the work of the Southern Poverty Law Center and its founder Morris Dees. A KKK group headed by racist and … By: John Ferrugia

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April 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Alleged KC gunman wanted to 'go out with a bang'

STORY HIGHLIGHTS (CNN) — Until a few days ago, Frazier Glenn Cross was just a customer to Dan Clevenger — albeit one with extremist views on race. Clevenger is the mayor of Marionville and the owner of an engine repair shop in the southwest Missouri town. Cross, who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, is a long time white supremacist whose self-financed book, “A White Man Speaks Out,” sits on the shelf in the town library. But the mayor said most of the 2,200 folk who live there didn’t subscribe to those beliefs. Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb


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April 17, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

UNG student from Gainesville awarded Udall scholarship

DAHLONEGA – John Dees, a junior majoring in environmental and spatial analysis at the University of North Georgia (UNG), has been selected to receive an Udall Scholarship, one of only 50 in the nation. The $5,000 scholarship was awarded to Dees for his “demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, economics, and other related fields.” The award will also provide Dees, who is from Gainesville, access to a network of environmental professionals. “John is truly a phenomenal student, a committed activist, and a patient teacher,” said Dr. Anastasia Turner, assistant dean of student research and scholarship and research mentor to Dees. “His affability and work ethic combine to make him a joy to work with and learn from. I can confidently say I have never before worked with a student with the mental and ethical capacity to create exceedingly constructive changes for our country and world.” The Udall Scholarship may also be awarded to Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated a commitment to careers related to tribal public policy or Native health care. The scholarship winners will attend a four-day Udall Scholars Orientation in Tucson, Ariz., in August to meet with their peers, elected officials, and environmental and tribal leaders. The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation provides complete travel, lodging and meal coverage for the attending scholars. “Dr. Turner really helped motivate me to go after this scholarship after she learned of it,” Dees said. “After reading up on the Udall Foundation, I decided it was perfectly in line with my interests. We spent about four months working on the application materials. I daydreamed about winning, but I was completely taken aback that I was actually selected.” Dees restarted his pursuit of higher education at age 35. He spent many hours during his first year receiving help in the writing center, and eventually moved on to helping tutor other students. “Helping others with their papers really honed my writing skills, and the amazing faculty in the Institute for Environmental and Spatial Analysis exposed me to a great deal of wonderful material, and have given me the opportunity to challenge myself,” Dees said. “Then, Dr. Peggy Strickland, who taught my honors ENGL 1102 class, introduced me to Dean Eric Skipper, who in turn introduced me to Dr. Turner. Both Dr. Skipper and Dr. Turner have supported me and offered me a number of opportunities, from conferences to undergraduate research, and ultimately, this scholarship.” Dees plans to graduate in spring 2015, after which he wishes to continue his education in a master’s program focused on public policy or environmental management. “I am very interested in applying the geographic information systems and remote sensing skills I’ve learned at UNG to sustainable development,” Dees said. “I eventually want to earn a doctorate, as I really want to be a professor one day. I’d like to get some ‘real world’ experience along the way, possibly working in the public sector for a while, but one day, I want to come back and teach, so I can give back what was given to me.”


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April 16, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Murder charges filed in shootings at Kansas Jewish sites

Prosecutors filed a death penalty murder charge Tuesday against a white supremacist accused of fatally shooting three people at Jewish sites in Kansas over the weekend, judicial sources said. Frazier Glenn Cross, 73, also known as F. Glenn Miller, was charged with one count of capital murder for the deaths of a 69-year-old physician and his teenaged grandson outside the Jewish Community Center …


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April 16, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Mayor: Alleged Jewish center gunman wanted to 'go out with a bang'

STORY HIGHLIGHTS (CNN) — Until a few days ago, Frazier Glenn Cross was just a customer to Dan Clevenger — albeit one with extremist views on race. Clevenger is the mayor of Marionville and the owner of an engine repair shop in the southwest Missouri town. Cross, who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, is a long time white supremacist whose self-financed book, “A White Man Speaks Out,” sits on the shelf in the town library. But the mayor said most of the 2,200 folk who live there didn’t subscribe to those beliefs. Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb Deadly shootings in Kansas City suburb


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April 16, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Suspect in Kansas shootings faces murder charges

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) Kansas prosecutors filed state-level murder charges Tuesday against the white supremacist accused in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City.


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April 16, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Kansas shooting suspect had no record of violence

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) Never one to keep his hatred to himself, Frazier Glenn Cross for decades sought out any soapbox to espouse his white-supremacist beliefs, twice running for federal office with campaigns steeped in anti-Semitism.


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April 15, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Suspect In Jewish Shootings Has An Appalling History Of White Supremacist Activities

A former Ku Klux Klan leader with a known…


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April 15, 2014  Tags: ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Little Free Libraries grow in Carrizozo

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Jim Boswell adds a title to his Little Free Library. He launched the lending libraries in Carrizozo, and the number in town will soon grow to 13. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) CARRIZOZO This Lincoln County town has two major highways, 984 residents and, contrary to popular misconception and poor spelling habits, only two Zs. Zozo, as its often known, is noted for its plentiful examples of adobe Craftsman-style architecture and as the place Denzel Washington shoots the livin heck out of in the movie The Book of Eli. Lately, it is becoming known for pop-up lending libraries. Jim Boswell, a 64-year-old who is winding down a career in the electronics industry, moved to Carrizozo in 2010 to semiretire and enjoy a life change. The peace and quiet is great, says Boswell, 64. The views are absolutely spectacular. I know my neighbors. Ive always lived in big cities before here and I never had any sense of community whatsoever. My neighbors were strangers to me, and I was in the rat race with the job and the travel and all of that. This is just different. Carrizozo had one drawback, though. It has no library. When I moved here, that was one of my big frustrations, Boswell told me. Im a big reader.


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April 13, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Caldwell High School Hall of Fame inducts a dynamic dozen

WEST CALDWELL– The way things were going, even the long-cycle Cicadas were being seen more often. We knew if we didn’t get it done this year, it might never get done, said Tom Caravela, a member of James Caldwell High Class of 1986, of the situation surrounding the JCHS Athletics Hall of Fame. Founded by longtime Chiefs coach Ken Trimmer and the Caldwell Gridiron Club in 1990, Hall of Fame induction ceremonies were held pretty much annually… until 1997, that is. At that point, the event seemed to go into hibernation and, unlike Cicadas, could very well have become extinct. That long dearth of inductions, however, finally came to an end two weeks ago, when a dozen individuals were inducted and a team was honored by the Hall at a ceremony on Friday, March 21, at Mayfair Farms in West Orange. The list of inductees includes 10 former standout athletes: Lew Lockward, Class of 1958, Wayne Masters, 87, Val Monaco, 90, Jen Luker, 92, Robert Masella, 93, Amanda Petronaci 96, Anthony Casciano 96, Kirsten Rossotti 98, Robert DInnocenzio 99, and Tom Edwards 04, along with former coach Barbara Cordasco and former athletic director Ron San Filippo. In addition, the 1997 state championship football team, the first of Caldwell’s back-to-back NJSIAA sectional championships of that time, was honored. The first class of inductees included Olympic gold medalist Tom Courtney, long time athletic director Chief Harris Bonnel, and Caldwells three sport star, Tom Martin. Since its inception in 1990, a total of 76 former athletes, coaches, and administrators have been installed inducted as members of the James Caldwell High School Athletic Hall of Fame. We knew it was pretty much now or never, said Caldwell Wrestling Club President Caravela, who spearheaded the effort to get the Hall’s inductions ceremonies back on track. It was a wonderful evening, said Trimmer. I was very, very happy with the way things went.


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April 3, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Student Interviews. Evaluation of their Stay in Verona – Video




Student Interviews. Evaluation of their Stay in Verona TR/AN Nathalie Kunin, MEd Educational Specialist, shares advice for parents on how to help your child improve his or her standardized test score without hav… By: Maple Woullard

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April 2, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Morris Dees – NNDB: Tracking the entire world

Morris Dees AKA Morris Seligman Dees, Jr. Born: 16-Dec-1936 Birthplace: Shorter, AL Gender: Male Religion: Unitarian [1] Race or Ethnicity: White Sexual orientation: Straight Occupation: Activist, Attorney Party Affiliation: Democratic Nationality: United States Executive summary: Bankrupted the Klan Father: Morris Seligman Dees, Sr. (d. 1961, traffic accident) Mother: Annie Ruth Dees Sister: Carolyn Wife: Beverly Crum (m. 15-Apr-1955, div.) Wife: Maureene Buck (div.) Wife: Elizabeth Breen Son: Morris III (by Beverly) Son: Johnny (by Beverly) Daughter: Ellie (by Maureene) High School: (1955) University: BA, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa (1958) Law School: LLB, University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa (1960) American Civil Liberties Union Future Farmers of America 1955 George McGovern for President, 1972 1971-72 John Edwards for President John Kerry for President Nader 2000 Sierra Club Southern Poverty Law Center Scottish Ancestry Author of books: A Season for Justice: The Life and Times of Civil Rights Lawyer Morris Dees (1991, memoir, with Steve Fiffer) Hate on Trial: The Case Against America’s Most Dangerous Neo-Nazi (1993, nonfiction, with Steve Fiffer) Gathering Storm: America’s Militia Threat (1997, nonfiction, with James Corcoran) Do you know something we don’t? Submit a correction or make a comment about this profile


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April 1, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed

Education events this week

MONDAY * Clarke Central Groundbreaking, 9 a.m., Clarke Central High School. Clarke public school officials hold a ceremony to mark the beginning of work on a $2.


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April 1, 2014  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,   Posted in: Morris Dees  Comments Closed


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