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Jewish NGO Simon Wiesenthal Center considers travel …

WARSAW (Reuters) – Jewish human rights organization Simon Wiesenthal Center said on Wednesday it was considering issuing a travel advisory for Jews urging them to limit their visits to Poland after the countrys relations with Israel were strained.

This month Poland sparked international criticism, including from Israel and the United States, when it approved a law that imposes jail terms for suggesting the country was complicit in the Holocaust.

Some three million Jews who lived in pre-war Poland were murdered by the Nazis during their occupation of the country. They accounted for about half of all Jews killed in the Holocaust.

Polands nationalist ruling party says the new law is needed to ensure that Poles are also recognized as victims, not perpetrators, of Nazi aggression. It notes that the Nazis also viewed Slavs as racially inferior and that many Poles were killed or forced into slave labor during the German occupation.

In wake of the controversial new Holocaust Law in Poland and the anti-Semitism it has unleashed that has left the Jewish community shaken, the Simon Wiesenthal Center (SWC) is considering issuing a Travel Advisory for world Jewry, the organization said in a statement issued late on Wednesday.

A Travel Advisory would urge Jews to limit their travel to Poland only to visit ancestral graves and Holocaust-era Death Camps, the NGO named after legendary Nazi hunter who died in 2005 said.

Many Poles believe their nation behaved honorably for the most part during the Holocaust. But research published since 1989 has sparked a painful debate about responsibility and reconciliation.

A 2000-2004 inquiry by Polands state Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) found that on July 10, 1941, Nazi occupiers and local inhabitants colluded in a massacre of at least 340 Jews at Jedwabne. Some victims were burned alive after being locked inside a barn.

The revelation disturbed the Poles belief that, with a few exceptions, they conducted themselves honorably during a vicious war in which a fifth of the nation perished. Some Poles still refuse to acknowledge the IPNs findings.

Anti-Semitism was common in Poland in the run-up to World War Two. After the war, a pogrom in the town of Kielce and a bout of anti-Semitism in 1968 sponsored by the communist authorities forced many survivors who had stayed in Poland to flee.

The SWC with headquarters in Los Angeles is one of the largest international Jewish human rights organizations with over 400,000 member families in the United States.

Reporting by Marcin Goclowski; Editing by Toby Chopra

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Simon Wiesenthal Center Mulls Poland Travel Advisory | The …

Photo Credit: Sebastian Karbowiak, courtesy the Anti-Defamation League

The Simon Wiesenthal Center is considering issuing a travel advisory for world Jewry in response to Polands new Holocaust Law and the anti-Semitism it has unleashed in the country.

The travel advisory would urge Jews to limit their travel to Poland only to visit ancestral graves and Holocaust-era Death Camps, said Rabbis Marvin Hier, dean and founder and Abraham Cooper, associate dean and director of global social action.

The two released a statement from the Center, which teaches the lessons of the Nazi Holocaust.

We would take such action with great reluctance, the statement read. We are not enemies of Poland. Our Center has brought hundreds of Jewish and non-Jewish leaders on dozens of missions over the past four decades.

Indeed, the Simon Wiesenthal Center has a long history of solidarity with the forces of democracy in Poland dating back to 1983 when our delegation traveled to Poland to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. It came at a time when Poland was under martial law by the communist regime, Hier and Cooper said.

We teach the millions of visitors to our Museum of Tolerance about Righteous Gentiles, including the thousands of Poles who saved Jews during the Shoah, and the Wiesenthal Center has honored WWII Polish hero, Jan Karski and hosted democracy hero Lech Walesa, they said.

But in 2018, we fear for a Poland that has now seen the history of the Holocaust recast by political forces who seek to bury the ugly past that includes the murder of Jews by Poles during the Holocaust and in the immediate aftermath of WWII.

If the anti-Semitism unleashed continues unabated, Jews will face increasing threats, they warned, adding that the Center will be closely monitoring the situation in the coming weeks and months and will act accordingly.

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Simon Wiesenthal – Activist – Biography

Simon Wiesenthal was a survivor of the Holocaust who worked as an author and Nazi hunter, wishing to ensure that what befell his community would be remembered.

Born in Buczacz, Galacia, on December 31, 1908, Simon Wiesenthal became an architect who was imprisoned in five different Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Wiesenthal devoted his life post-war to Holocaust memory and education, and founded the Jewish Documentation Center in Vienna. He also worked on investigations into locating Nazi criminals for prosecution. He died on September 20, 2005, in Vienna, Austria.

Simon Wiesenthal was born on December 31, 1908, in Buczacz, Galacia, once part of Austria-Hungary and now known as Buchach, Ukraine. During his childhood, Wiesenthal’s father died in World War I as part of the Austrian army. The family also faced persecution from occupying soldiers, who often singled out Jewish families. Wiesenthal was slashed and permanently scarred with a saber when running an errand for his mother.

Wiesenthal earned a degree in architectural engineering during the early 1930s, setting up a practice in the city of Lvov and, in 1936, marrying Cyla Muller, who’d been his girlfriend from high school. A few years later, the Soviet Union occupied the region, with Wiesenthal losing members of his stepfamily. He was made to work in a bedsprings factory and later reported that he was only able to save himself and his wife from being sent to Siberia through bribery.

After the German occupation in 1941, Wiesenthal and his wife were placed into forced labor at the German Eastern Railway plants. Cyla was able to pass as Polish and was transported out of the camp by an underground movement. Enduring a waking nightmare, Wiesenthal was imprisoned in several different camps, during which time he managed to escape, though recaptured, and attempted suicide twice. He was ultimately transported to the Janowska camp in 1944. Later, a large group of SS guards, fleeing the Red Army, also transported less than three dozen prisonersthe only people still alive out of an original camp population of more than 100,000.

Wiesenthal was released from his final camp in Mauthausen, Austria, in May 1945 by a U.S. Army unit. The severely malnourished Wiesenthal, at 6 feet tall, weighed less than 100 lbs by this time. He made his way back to health and was reunited with Cyla by the end of 1945. Dozens of members of his and his wife’s extended families had died in the camps, among the millions of Jews and other ethnic populations who were killed during the Nazi regime.

Simon Wiesenthal then dedicated his life to tracking down and prosecuting former Nazis who’d been in power. He directed the Jewish Documentation Center in Linz (1947-54) and Vienna (beginning in 1961), and founded the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles in 1977.

Wiesenthal has been credited with contributing to the capture of “final solution” coordinator Adolf Eichmann in 1961. He has also been credited with investigations that led to the capture of other war criminals, including death camp commander Franz Stangl and Gestapo worker Karl Silberbauer, who was responsible for the arrest of Anne Frank. Wiesenthal continued his efforts well into his later years, though his house was firebombed in 1982, with no one being injured.

Wiesenthal’s influence extended to the literary world, as well. In 1967, he published the book The Murderers Among Us: The Wiesenthal Memoirs, followed in 1969 by the exploratory work The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness.

Wiesenthal has run into his share of controversy, including allegations from prominent figures that a significant portion of his claims about his career and involvement in certain cases were untrue. He also had conflict with writer and Holocaust survivor Eli Wiesel.

Wiesenthal’s work is recognized for continuing to shed light on the injustices and horrors of the Holocaust, for calling on governmental intervention in the capture of war criminals and for being a driven, often times singular, investigative force. Among a legion of awards and accolades, he’s received the Dutch and Luxembourg Medals of Freedom and the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor. He was also the subject of the 1989 HBO biopic Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story, which starred Ben Kingsley in the lead role. Another memoir, Justice Not Vengeance: Recollections, was published that same year.

In 2003, at the age of 94, Wiesenthal announced his retirement. One year later, he was knighted. Wiesenthal died on September 20, 2005, in Vienna, Austria.

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Simon Wiesenthal Center – Home | Facebook

Its up to us to confront the bigots and the hatersto stand up to the marchers in Charlottesvilleto protest the fanatical terrorists who want to destroy the world. Its up to us to confront haters on campusthe haters on campuses everywhere not only in the United States but in Europe and Canada all preaching hatred against the Jewish peopleplease support the Simon Wiesenthal Center and our work in the United States and around the world Rabbi Marvin Hier, Founder and Dean Simon Wiesenthal Center #SWC #Chanukah #HappyChanukah

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Home – Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center

A comprehensive resource on the Holocaust and World War II, with over 3,000 text files, and tens of thousands of photos. Featuring: glossary, timeline, bibliographies, 36 questions and answers about the Holocaust, and curricular resources for teachers. Online versions of past exhibitions from the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Museum of Tolerance. 93 topics featuring 13,785 documents in English, German and Hebrew from the Institute of Documentation in Israel. At-a-glance navigation to all of the major topics and points of interest in The Museum of Tolerance Mutimedia Learning Center Online. Frequently asked questions, contact information, useful links and additional information.

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Home – Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center

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Youth Olympics Adds Anti-Racism Program From Simon Wiesenthal Center – Forward

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BUENOS AIRES (JTA) A Simon Wiesenthal Center program against racism in sports will be implemented in the2018 Buenos Aires Youth Olympic Games with the support of the Organization of American States.

The Eleven Points Against Racism in Football program works with sport authorities, athletes and referees to stop and prevent racial hatred in sport matches and events and to use sports as a bond between peoples.

On Tuesday, theLatin American representative of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Dr. Ariel Gelblung, confirmed to JTA the agreement with OAS and its support to implement the program during next years global event for young athletes.

On Friday,OAS confirmed its decision to grant its support to the program as a way to fight for fundamental rights.

If we succeed in eradicating racism, xenophobia and discrimination in sport we can generate a greater awareness in society. As Nelson Mandela has shown, sport is a powerful tool for changing unacceptable behaviors and promoting inclusive societies, Organization of American States Secretary GeneralLuis Almagro said in a letter to the Wiesenthal Center.

The initiative was inspired by a similar program, Football Against Racism in Europe, or FARE, to prevent violence in major sporting events.

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Youth Olympics Adds Anti-Racism Program From Simon Wiesenthal Center – Forward

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Leading Japanese surgeon urged to step down for praises of Nazism – The Jerusalem Post

The Nazi slogan “Arbeit macht frei” (Work sets you free) is pictured at the gates of the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017. (photo credit:AGENCY GAZETA/KUBA OCIEPA/VIA REUTERS)

The Simon Wiesenthal Center on Tuesday urged the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery to take action against prominent Japanese surgeon Dr. Katsuya Takasu, after Tweets of his from two years ago resurfaced, including praise of the Nazi regime and denial of the Holocaust and the Nanjing Massacre.

As well as being a high-profile member of the academy, Takasu is also a well-known media personality in Japan.

Estonia-based Japanese blogger Kino Toshiko alerted the Simon Wiesenthal Center to the Tweets made by the doctor in 2015, and posted English translations of them to his webpage.

According to the translations of the Tweets, Takasu talked of how great Nazism was, later explaining that he meant it with relation to the progress made in German medicine under the Nazi regime.

There is no doubt that the Jews were persecuted.

But we only know it from hearsay and all of it is based on information from the Allies. Arent we acting the same as the Chinese people who believe in the Nanjing Massacre? I only want to know the truth, another Tweet reads.

I think both the Nanjing and Auschwitz are fabrications, he stated in another.

In a letter to Dr. Michael Kluska, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean and director of Global Social Action for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, wrote that Takasus posts violate all norms of decency and reveal a person who is a racist antisemite and outright lover of Nazism.

Takasu had also dismissed the murder of disabled people at the hands of the Nazis as Allies propaganda.

Cooper wrote, [Takasu] claims that The science developed [by] the Nazis is immortal….

He dismisses the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of the physically and mentally disabled by the Nazis as Allied propaganda. He insults the memory of the victims of the Nazis and of Imperial Japan: I think both the Nanjing [massacre] and Auschwitz are fabrications. Cooper concluded the letter to Kluska by writing, The last thing our world needs today is the embrace of Nazi ideology, under whose banner physicians carried out unspeakable crimes in the name of progress. Takasus continued membership in the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery should be canceled immediately.

Takasu has since denied that he is a member of that Jews organization, but he appears as a member of the Academy on a 2016 listing.

The Jerusalem Post contacted the Academy for comment.

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Prada and Other Clothing Companies Keep Putting Nazi, Holocaust Symbols in Their Designs – Newsweek

The Prada-owned brand Miu Miu is the latest to stumble with a design that incorporates symbols linked by some to the Holocaust. The company recently released a collection of items featuring a five-pointed yellow star, reminiscent of but not identical to the Star of David that Jews were forced to wear under the brutal Nazi regime.

The World Jewish Congress (WJC), an international organization founded in 1936 that advocates on behalf of Jewish communities and groups, writes that it contacted Miu Miu on Monday to express its discomfort over the items and demand their removal, and then lauded the companys immediate move to do so.

The World Jewish Congress commends Miu Miu and its parent company, Prada, on its swift attention and action to the concerns we raised regarding the use of the yellow star on its clothing items, WJC CEO and Executive Vice President Robert Singer said in a statement on Tuesday. At this critical time, when anti-Semitism and bigotry are rearing their heads in the public sphere, we must continue to exercise caution and show sensitivity in every sphere and sector.

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Preia Narendra, senior vice president of marketing and communications at Miu Miu, thanked the WJC for bringing the matter to the companys attention. It was not Miu Mius intent in any way to make any political or religious statement, and we apologize for any offense that may have been taken, she told the WJC. Kindly note that effective immediately these items will be removed from the collection.

One writer, Michelle Honig, speculated in The Forward that the Miu Miu designs were less of an anti-Semitic statement and more of an unwitting similarity. She added that not all the star patches looked like the sartorial markers used by the Nazis to identify Jews, with some of Miu Mius patches appearing in pink or red. And the yellow star? If I were to hazard a guess, the star patch is meant to resemble the gold foil star stickers teachers use for good behavior and good marks on tests, she said.

The Miu Miu incident is just the latest in a long line of questionable design decisions by prominent brands that indicate, at the very least, a lack of attention to detail and an ignorance of the many symbols intertwined with a horrific history. In 2002, for example, the sportswear company Umbro drew a flood of criticism over its Zyklon trainer. The company insisted the name of its shoe wasnt chosen as a deliberate reference to the Holocaust, and it had apparently not been aware that the chemical Zyklon B was used to murder Nazi victims in extermination camps.

Shimon Samuels ofthe Simon Wiesenthal Center told Umbro in a letter at the time that its outrageous misuse of the Holocaust is an insult to its victims and survivors.

The clothing companies Urban Outfitters and Zara have been repeat offenders. In February 2015, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) sent a letter to the president and CEO of Urban Outfitters, headquartered in Philadelphia, urging the company to remove an item that reminded observers of the uniforms worn by gay male prisoners in Nazi concentration camps.

Whether intentional or not, this gray-and-white striped pattern and pink triangle combination is deeply offensive and should not be mainstreamed into popular culture, Abraham H. Foxman, the ADL national director and a Holocaust survivor, said at the time. We urge Urban Outfitters to immediately remove the product eerily reminiscent of clothing forced upon the victims of the Holocaust from their stores and online.

That incident came less than three years after another Urban Outfitters item, a yellow T-shirt with a six-pointed star, spurred outrage from critics. The ADL found the use of symbolism to be extremely distasteful and offensive, and we are outraged that your company would make this product available to your customers, Barry Morrison, an ADL regional director, wrote in a letter at the time.

In 2014, a striped shirt with a six-pointed yellow star being sold by Zara was panned as a Holocaust uniform or Holocaust shirt. The Spain-based company withdrew the item and apologized, explaining that the garment was inspired by the classic Western films, but we now recognize that the design could be seen as insensitive and apologize sincerely for any offense caused to our customers. In 2007, the same company withdrew a handbag whose pattern incorporated green swastikas.

Despite repeated gaffes, brands in the U.S. and abroad havent seemed to learn how to avoid designs that spark fury for their jarring allusionseven if accidentalto the Holocaust. But at a time when anti-Semitic incidents in America have increased drastically, and when flags emblazoned with swastikas are being raised at rallies like the one that turned violent earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia, its urgent that individuals and companies alike understand the meaning of these symbols.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Donates $100K To Simon Wiesenthal Center After Charlottesville – Forward

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(JTA) Arnold Schwarzenegger has donated $100,000 to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which combats anti-Semitism and bigotry, in the wake of the far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The actor and former California governor announced the donation Sunday on Facebook, where he wrote that he was horrified by the previous days rally bringing together neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other far-right activists. The rally featured racist and anti-Semitic slogans, and a car-ramming attack by a participant killed a counterprotester and injured at least 19 people. Two police officers monitoring the rally also died when their helicopter crashed.

I have been horrified by the images of Nazis and white supremacists marching in Charlottesville and I was heartbroken that a domestic terrorist took an innocent life, Schwarzenegger wrote. My message to them is simple: you will not win. Our voices are louder and stronger. There is no white America there is only the United States of America.

Schwarzenegger, also a former bodybuilder, said he has worked with the Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center for decades, and admires the Centers mission of expanding tolerance through education and fighting hate all over America in the streets and online.

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Jewish NGO Simon Wiesenthal Center considers travel …

WARSAW (Reuters) – Jewish human rights organization Simon Wiesenthal Center said on Wednesday it was considering issuing a travel advisory for Jews urging them to limit their visits to Poland after the countrys relations with Israel were strained. This month Poland sparked international criticism, including from Israel and the United States, when it approved a law that imposes jail terms for suggesting the country was complicit in the Holocaust. Some three million Jews who lived in pre-war Poland were murdered by the Nazis during their occupation of the country. They accounted for about half of all Jews killed in the Holocaust. Polands nationalist ruling party says the new law is needed to ensure that Poles are also recognized as victims, not perpetrators, of Nazi aggression. It notes that the Nazis also viewed Slavs as racially inferior and that many Poles were killed or forced into slave labor during the German occupation. In wake of the controversial new Holocaust Law in Poland and the anti-Semitism it has unleashed that has left the Jewish community shaken, the Simon Wiesenthal Center (SWC) is considering issuing a Travel Advisory for world Jewry, the organization said in a statement issued late on Wednesday. A Travel Advisory would urge Jews to limit their travel to Poland only to visit ancestral graves and Holocaust-era Death Camps, the NGO named after legendary Nazi hunter who died in 2005 said. Many Poles believe their nation behaved honorably for the most part during the Holocaust. But research published since 1989 has sparked a painful debate about responsibility and reconciliation. A 2000-2004 inquiry by Polands state Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) found that on July 10, 1941, Nazi occupiers and local inhabitants colluded in a massacre of at least 340 Jews at Jedwabne. Some victims were burned alive after being locked inside a barn. The revelation disturbed the Poles belief that, with a few exceptions, they conducted themselves honorably during a vicious war in which a fifth of the nation perished. Some Poles still refuse to acknowledge the IPNs findings. Anti-Semitism was common in Poland in the run-up to World War Two. After the war, a pogrom in the town of Kielce and a bout of anti-Semitism in 1968 sponsored by the communist authorities forced many survivors who had stayed in Poland to flee. The SWC with headquarters in Los Angeles is one of the largest international Jewish human rights organizations with over 400,000 member families in the United States. Reporting by Marcin Goclowski; Editing by Toby Chopra

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Simon Wiesenthal Center Mulls Poland Travel Advisory | The …

Photo Credit: Sebastian Karbowiak, courtesy the Anti-Defamation League The Simon Wiesenthal Center is considering issuing a travel advisory for world Jewry in response to Polands new Holocaust Law and the anti-Semitism it has unleashed in the country. The travel advisory would urge Jews to limit their travel to Poland only to visit ancestral graves and Holocaust-era Death Camps, said Rabbis Marvin Hier, dean and founder and Abraham Cooper, associate dean and director of global social action. The two released a statement from the Center, which teaches the lessons of the Nazi Holocaust. We would take such action with great reluctance, the statement read. We are not enemies of Poland. Our Center has brought hundreds of Jewish and non-Jewish leaders on dozens of missions over the past four decades. Indeed, the Simon Wiesenthal Center has a long history of solidarity with the forces of democracy in Poland dating back to 1983 when our delegation traveled to Poland to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. It came at a time when Poland was under martial law by the communist regime, Hier and Cooper said. We teach the millions of visitors to our Museum of Tolerance about Righteous Gentiles, including the thousands of Poles who saved Jews during the Shoah, and the Wiesenthal Center has honored WWII Polish hero, Jan Karski and hosted democracy hero Lech Walesa, they said. But in 2018, we fear for a Poland that has now seen the history of the Holocaust recast by political forces who seek to bury the ugly past that includes the murder of Jews by Poles during the Holocaust and in the immediate aftermath of WWII. If the anti-Semitism unleashed continues unabated, Jews will face increasing threats, they warned, adding that the Center will be closely monitoring the situation in the coming weeks and months and will act accordingly.

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Simon Wiesenthal – Activist – Biography

Simon Wiesenthal was a survivor of the Holocaust who worked as an author and Nazi hunter, wishing to ensure that what befell his community would be remembered. Born in Buczacz, Galacia, on December 31, 1908, Simon Wiesenthal became an architect who was imprisoned in five different Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Wiesenthal devoted his life post-war to Holocaust memory and education, and founded the Jewish Documentation Center in Vienna. He also worked on investigations into locating Nazi criminals for prosecution. He died on September 20, 2005, in Vienna, Austria. Simon Wiesenthal was born on December 31, 1908, in Buczacz, Galacia, once part of Austria-Hungary and now known as Buchach, Ukraine. During his childhood, Wiesenthal’s father died in World War I as part of the Austrian army. The family also faced persecution from occupying soldiers, who often singled out Jewish families. Wiesenthal was slashed and permanently scarred with a saber when running an errand for his mother. Wiesenthal earned a degree in architectural engineering during the early 1930s, setting up a practice in the city of Lvov and, in 1936, marrying Cyla Muller, who’d been his girlfriend from high school. A few years later, the Soviet Union occupied the region, with Wiesenthal losing members of his stepfamily. He was made to work in a bedsprings factory and later reported that he was only able to save himself and his wife from being sent to Siberia through bribery. After the German occupation in 1941, Wiesenthal and his wife were placed into forced labor at the German Eastern Railway plants. Cyla was able to pass as Polish and was transported out of the camp by an underground movement. Enduring a waking nightmare, Wiesenthal was imprisoned in several different camps, during which time he managed to escape, though recaptured, and attempted suicide twice. He was ultimately transported to the Janowska camp in 1944. Later, a large group of SS guards, fleeing the Red Army, also transported less than three dozen prisonersthe only people still alive out of an original camp population of more than 100,000. Wiesenthal was released from his final camp in Mauthausen, Austria, in May 1945 by a U.S. Army unit. The severely malnourished Wiesenthal, at 6 feet tall, weighed less than 100 lbs by this time. He made his way back to health and was reunited with Cyla by the end of 1945. Dozens of members of his and his wife’s extended families had died in the camps, among the millions of Jews and other ethnic populations who were killed during the Nazi regime. Simon Wiesenthal then dedicated his life to tracking down and prosecuting former Nazis who’d been in power. He directed the Jewish Documentation Center in Linz (1947-54) and Vienna (beginning in 1961), and founded the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles in 1977. Wiesenthal has been credited with contributing to the capture of “final solution” coordinator Adolf Eichmann in 1961. He has also been credited with investigations that led to the capture of other war criminals, including death camp commander Franz Stangl and Gestapo worker Karl Silberbauer, who was responsible for the arrest of Anne Frank. Wiesenthal continued his efforts well into his later years, though his house was firebombed in 1982, with no one being injured. Wiesenthal’s influence extended to the literary world, as well. In 1967, he published the book The Murderers Among Us: The Wiesenthal Memoirs, followed in 1969 by the exploratory work The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness. Wiesenthal has run into his share of controversy, including allegations from prominent figures that a significant portion of his claims about his career and involvement in certain cases were untrue. He also had conflict with writer and Holocaust survivor Eli Wiesel. Wiesenthal’s work is recognized for continuing to shed light on the injustices and horrors of the Holocaust, for calling on governmental intervention in the capture of war criminals and for being a driven, often times singular, investigative force. Among a legion of awards and accolades, he’s received the Dutch and Luxembourg Medals of Freedom and the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor. He was also the subject of the 1989 HBO biopic Murderers Among Us: The Simon Wiesenthal Story, which starred Ben Kingsley in the lead role. Another memoir, Justice Not Vengeance: Recollections, was published that same year. In 2003, at the age of 94, Wiesenthal announced his retirement. One year later, he was knighted. Wiesenthal died on September 20, 2005, in Vienna, Austria.

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Simon Wiesenthal Center – Home | Facebook

Its up to us to confront the bigots and the hatersto stand up to the marchers in Charlottesvilleto protest the fanatical terrorists who want to destroy the world. Its up to us to confront haters on campusthe haters on campuses everywhere not only in the United States but in Europe and Canada all preaching hatred against the Jewish peopleplease support the Simon Wiesenthal Center and our work in the United States and around the world Rabbi Marvin Hier, Founder and Dean Simon Wiesenthal Center #SWC #Chanukah #HappyChanukah

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Home – Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center

A comprehensive resource on the Holocaust and World War II, with over 3,000 text files, and tens of thousands of photos. Featuring: glossary, timeline, bibliographies, 36 questions and answers about the Holocaust, and curricular resources for teachers. Online versions of past exhibitions from the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Museum of Tolerance. 93 topics featuring 13,785 documents in English, German and Hebrew from the Institute of Documentation in Israel. At-a-glance navigation to all of the major topics and points of interest in The Museum of Tolerance Mutimedia Learning Center Online. Frequently asked questions, contact information, useful links and additional information.

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Youth Olympics Adds Anti-Racism Program From Simon Wiesenthal Center – Forward

flickr BUENOS AIRES (JTA) A Simon Wiesenthal Center program against racism in sports will be implemented in the2018 Buenos Aires Youth Olympic Games with the support of the Organization of American States. The Eleven Points Against Racism in Football program works with sport authorities, athletes and referees to stop and prevent racial hatred in sport matches and events and to use sports as a bond between peoples. On Tuesday, theLatin American representative of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Dr. Ariel Gelblung, confirmed to JTA the agreement with OAS and its support to implement the program during next years global event for young athletes. On Friday,OAS confirmed its decision to grant its support to the program as a way to fight for fundamental rights. If we succeed in eradicating racism, xenophobia and discrimination in sport we can generate a greater awareness in society. As Nelson Mandela has shown, sport is a powerful tool for changing unacceptable behaviors and promoting inclusive societies, Organization of American States Secretary GeneralLuis Almagro said in a letter to the Wiesenthal Center. The initiative was inspired by a similar program, Football Against Racism in Europe, or FARE, to prevent violence in major sporting events.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Simon Wiesenthal  Comments Closed

Leading Japanese surgeon urged to step down for praises of Nazism – The Jerusalem Post

The Nazi slogan “Arbeit macht frei” (Work sets you free) is pictured at the gates of the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017. (photo credit:AGENCY GAZETA/KUBA OCIEPA/VIA REUTERS) The Simon Wiesenthal Center on Tuesday urged the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery to take action against prominent Japanese surgeon Dr. Katsuya Takasu, after Tweets of his from two years ago resurfaced, including praise of the Nazi regime and denial of the Holocaust and the Nanjing Massacre. As well as being a high-profile member of the academy, Takasu is also a well-known media personality in Japan. Estonia-based Japanese blogger Kino Toshiko alerted the Simon Wiesenthal Center to the Tweets made by the doctor in 2015, and posted English translations of them to his webpage. According to the translations of the Tweets, Takasu talked of how great Nazism was, later explaining that he meant it with relation to the progress made in German medicine under the Nazi regime. There is no doubt that the Jews were persecuted. But we only know it from hearsay and all of it is based on information from the Allies. Arent we acting the same as the Chinese people who believe in the Nanjing Massacre? I only want to know the truth, another Tweet reads. I think both the Nanjing and Auschwitz are fabrications, he stated in another. In a letter to Dr. Michael Kluska, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean and director of Global Social Action for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, wrote that Takasus posts violate all norms of decency and reveal a person who is a racist antisemite and outright lover of Nazism. Takasu had also dismissed the murder of disabled people at the hands of the Nazis as Allies propaganda. Cooper wrote, [Takasu] claims that The science developed [by] the Nazis is immortal…. He dismisses the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of the physically and mentally disabled by the Nazis as Allied propaganda. He insults the memory of the victims of the Nazis and of Imperial Japan: I think both the Nanjing [massacre] and Auschwitz are fabrications. Cooper concluded the letter to Kluska by writing, The last thing our world needs today is the embrace of Nazi ideology, under whose banner physicians carried out unspeakable crimes in the name of progress. Takasus continued membership in the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery should be canceled immediately. Takasu has since denied that he is a member of that Jews organization, but he appears as a member of the Academy on a 2016 listing. The Jerusalem Post contacted the Academy for comment. Share on facebook

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Simon Wiesenthal  Comments Closed

Prada and Other Clothing Companies Keep Putting Nazi, Holocaust Symbols in Their Designs – Newsweek

The Prada-owned brand Miu Miu is the latest to stumble with a design that incorporates symbols linked by some to the Holocaust. The company recently released a collection of items featuring a five-pointed yellow star, reminiscent of but not identical to the Star of David that Jews were forced to wear under the brutal Nazi regime. The World Jewish Congress (WJC), an international organization founded in 1936 that advocates on behalf of Jewish communities and groups, writes that it contacted Miu Miu on Monday to express its discomfort over the items and demand their removal, and then lauded the companys immediate move to do so. The World Jewish Congress commends Miu Miu and its parent company, Prada, on its swift attention and action to the concerns we raised regarding the use of the yellow star on its clothing items, WJC CEO and Executive Vice President Robert Singer said in a statement on Tuesday. At this critical time, when anti-Semitism and bigotry are rearing their heads in the public sphere, we must continue to exercise caution and show sensitivity in every sphere and sector. Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now Preia Narendra, senior vice president of marketing and communications at Miu Miu, thanked the WJC for bringing the matter to the companys attention. It was not Miu Mius intent in any way to make any political or religious statement, and we apologize for any offense that may have been taken, she told the WJC. Kindly note that effective immediately these items will be removed from the collection. One writer, Michelle Honig, speculated in The Forward that the Miu Miu designs were less of an anti-Semitic statement and more of an unwitting similarity. She added that not all the star patches looked like the sartorial markers used by the Nazis to identify Jews, with some of Miu Mius patches appearing in pink or red. And the yellow star? If I were to hazard a guess, the star patch is meant to resemble the gold foil star stickers teachers use for good behavior and good marks on tests, she said. The Miu Miu incident is just the latest in a long line of questionable design decisions by prominent brands that indicate, at the very least, a lack of attention to detail and an ignorance of the many symbols intertwined with a horrific history. In 2002, for example, the sportswear company Umbro drew a flood of criticism over its Zyklon trainer. The company insisted the name of its shoe wasnt chosen as a deliberate reference to the Holocaust, and it had apparently not been aware that the chemical Zyklon B was used to murder Nazi victims in extermination camps. Shimon Samuels ofthe Simon Wiesenthal Center told Umbro in a letter at the time that its outrageous misuse of the Holocaust is an insult to its victims and survivors. The clothing companies Urban Outfitters and Zara have been repeat offenders. In February 2015, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) sent a letter to the president and CEO of Urban Outfitters, headquartered in Philadelphia, urging the company to remove an item that reminded observers of the uniforms worn by gay male prisoners in Nazi concentration camps. Whether intentional or not, this gray-and-white striped pattern and pink triangle combination is deeply offensive and should not be mainstreamed into popular culture, Abraham H. Foxman, the ADL national director and a Holocaust survivor, said at the time. We urge Urban Outfitters to immediately remove the product eerily reminiscent of clothing forced upon the victims of the Holocaust from their stores and online. That incident came less than three years after another Urban Outfitters item, a yellow T-shirt with a six-pointed star, spurred outrage from critics. The ADL found the use of symbolism to be extremely distasteful and offensive, and we are outraged that your company would make this product available to your customers, Barry Morrison, an ADL regional director, wrote in a letter at the time. In 2014, a striped shirt with a six-pointed yellow star being sold by Zara was panned as a Holocaust uniform or Holocaust shirt. The Spain-based company withdrew the item and apologized, explaining that the garment was inspired by the classic Western films, but we now recognize that the design could be seen as insensitive and apologize sincerely for any offense caused to our customers. In 2007, the same company withdrew a handbag whose pattern incorporated green swastikas. Despite repeated gaffes, brands in the U.S. and abroad havent seemed to learn how to avoid designs that spark fury for their jarring allusionseven if accidentalto the Holocaust. But at a time when anti-Semitic incidents in America have increased drastically, and when flags emblazoned with swastikas are being raised at rallies like the one that turned violent earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia, its urgent that individuals and companies alike understand the meaning of these symbols.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Simon Wiesenthal  Comments Closed

Arnold Schwarzenegger Donates $100K To Simon Wiesenthal Center After Charlottesville – Forward

Getty Images (JTA) Arnold Schwarzenegger has donated $100,000 to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which combats anti-Semitism and bigotry, in the wake of the far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The actor and former California governor announced the donation Sunday on Facebook, where he wrote that he was horrified by the previous days rally bringing together neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other far-right activists. The rally featured racist and anti-Semitic slogans, and a car-ramming attack by a participant killed a counterprotester and injured at least 19 people. Two police officers monitoring the rally also died when their helicopter crashed. I have been horrified by the images of Nazis and white supremacists marching in Charlottesville and I was heartbroken that a domestic terrorist took an innocent life, Schwarzenegger wrote. My message to them is simple: you will not win. Our voices are louder and stronger. There is no white America there is only the United States of America. Schwarzenegger, also a former bodybuilder, said he has worked with the Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center for decades, and admires the Centers mission of expanding tolerance through education and fighting hate all over America in the streets and online.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Simon Wiesenthal  Comments Closed


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