Archive for the ‘Southern Poverty Law Center’ Category

Will ACT for America Provide An Outlet for the ‘Alt-Right’ Post … – Southern Poverty Law Center

With a spate of event cancellations such as a protestagainst Google and scheduled appearances by Richard Spencer at two major universities ACT for America’s nation-wide America First rallies slated forSeptember 9 may bring the Alt-Rightto the streets once again.

In June, ACT for America thelargest anti-Muslim group in the United States organized simultaneousMarch Against Shariah events across the country which wereattended by a plethora of racist groups, including two of the more prominent groups to appear in Charlottesville: The “blood and soil” fascist group Vanguard America (VA),and the white nationalist Identity Evropa (IE).Always quick to distance itself from racism, ACT sent an email to its followers denouncing the violence in Charlottesville,while at the same time promoting its rallies on September 9, claiming, any organizations or individuals advocating violence or hatred towards anyone based on race, religion, or affiliation are not welcome at this rally.

At the New York City march on June 10, Richard Rivera, a Vanguard Americaspokesperson, attended and spoke to media, telling the Washington Post, I dont believe in having Muslims in the United States. Their culture is incompatible with ours. James Alex Fields, the alleged driver of the car that killed one and injured 20 when he plowed into counter-protesters in Charlottesville was pictured marching with Vanguard America, donning their attire and holding a shield with the VA logo.

Fields with shield second from left.

Identity Evropa, which hada heavy presence in Charlottesville, also attendedvarious ACT rallies on June 10. Identity Evropa is lead by Nathan Damigo, a former Marine corporal who discovered his inner white nationalist by reading the work of Holocaust-denying ex-Klansman David Duke while serving five years for armed robbery (while drunk, he put a gun to the head of a cab driver he thought was Iraqi and stole $43). At ACT’sIndianapolis March Against Shariah, Identity Evropas regional coordinator Jason Richardson spoke. In Orlando, IE members held up a large banner while listening to Holocaust-denier Augustus Sol Invictus and others speak. Damigo himself attending the Roseville, Californiarally.

Nathan Damigo, founder of the white nationalist/identitarian group Identity Evropa, at an ACT For America rally in June.

What attracts white nationalist groups to ACT is the groups vehemently anti-Muslim views. While ACT warns about Sharialaw replacing the Constitution and how Europe is being overrun by Muslims, the rallying cry for the racists who descended on Charlottesville was, You will not replace us! White nationalist Jason Kessler, the organizerof the rally took to Periscope in the week leading up to Charlottesville and stated, These people are trying to replace us with third-world immigrants, they are trying to replace us with Muslims. The closed Facebook group used in part to organize the ACT rallies not only contains posts that are sympathetic to Charlottesville, but also plenty of racist material.

This is not the first time ACT hasattemptedto distance itself from white nationalist groups. Billy Roper, aprominent neo-Nazi for decades, had been officially charged with organizinga JuneACT rally inBatesville, Arkansas; ACTdropped him after the SPLC exposedhis racist past and current beliefs. In March, ACT was forced to fire a prominent chapter leader after remarks about killing Muslims were made public. Considering the common ground between overtly racist groups and ACTfor America, there is very little to indicate that Vanguard America, Identity Evropa and other white nationalists wont flock to the ACT rallies, which will betaking place in over 50 cities across the country.

A flyer designed by Vanguard America (VA). VA was responsible for over 40 flyering drops in 2017 featuring flyers like this one. VA appeared at an ACT For America rally in June, along with other racist ‘alt-right’ groups.

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Will ACT for America Provide An Outlet for the ‘Alt-Right’ Post … – Southern Poverty Law Center

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32 Hate Groups Call Illinois Home, Southern Poverty Law Center Says – NBC Chicago

At a press event that was supposed to focus on infrastructure, President Donald Trump answered questions about violence that erupted at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. He again blamed both sides for violence and described counter-protesters as the “alt-left.” (Published Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017)

From a white power record label in Burbank to an Aryan motorcycle club in Canton, there are 32 active hate groups in the state of Illinois, according to the Southern Poverty Law Centera nonprofit advocating against extremism.

While the nations history is wrought with examples of racism and bigotry, groups like the SPLC are sounding the alarm over current eventssuch as the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last weekend. A 32-year-old woman was killed and 15 people were injured after a car rammed into a crowd of counter-protesters.

Another nonprofit, the Anti-Defamation League, expressed concern ahead of the so-called Unite the Right rally and said it was possibly the largest white supremacist gathering in a decade.

Illinois is no stranger to such demonstrations. In 1978, a neo-Nazi group planned to march in Skokie where a large Jewish population, including Holocaust survivors, resides. The Nazis instead marched in Marquette Park in Chicago where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once lived.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who was among those rallying against the Nazis at the time, called it a political awakening in a recent statement rebuking President Donald Trumps failure to squarely blame white supremacists for Virginias spate of violence.

The SPLCs digital Hate Map, an interactive feature on its website cataloging what it calls extremist and fringe groups, has been circulated widely on social media in recent days in response to the events in Charlottesville.

SPLC officials did not respond to request for comment. On its website, the organization details why it has included the groups on its map.

Lonnie Nasatir, the Midwest regional director for the ADL, says hate groups in Illinois today are fluid, often quickly dissolving and hard to track.

Theyre very hard to quantify, he said in a phone interview, adding that the 32 listed by the SPLC is a good ballpark number.

The ADL says white supremacists and extremists have renewed attempts to insert their hatred in a number of towns and cities across the country, placing much of the blame on rhetoric coming from the Trump White House.

The president has faced heavy criticism since his insistence that the Charlottesville violence was stoked by both sides, though he has denounced Nazis, the KKK and white supremacists in scripted comments. Trumps statements, however, have garnered the praise of former KKK grand wizard David Duke and white nationalist icon Richard Spencer.

Unfortunately we didnt get the denunciation we were looking for from the president, Nasatir said. My fear is that theyve (white supremacists) again been emboldened and are feeling empowered to go to the next rally.

Nasatir said groups like the ADL and SPLC are staying vigilant in the fight against extremism and hate. He said his organization is communicating with law enforcement about its findings all the time.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says it does at times investigate domestic hate groups but does not actively track them.

Our focus is not on membership in particular groups or adherence to particular ideologies or beliefs but on criminal activity, said FBI spokeswoman Diane Carbonara. The FBI cannot initiate an investigation based solely on an individuals race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, or the exercise of the First Amendment or other Constitutional rights, and we remain committed to protecting those rights for all Americans.

In interviews given since the chaos in Charlottesville, some marchers said they were only there to protest the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Leewhile others openly professed their racist beliefs.

Still, not everyone agrees with the SPLCs findings. The village of Gurnee, reportedly home to a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, has requested to be removed from the Hate Map.

Gurnee police told the Lake County News-Sun there has been no record of Klan activity in the area since 1987.

The American Family Association, a conservative advocacy group defending natural marriage and resisting the aggressive, radical, homosexual agenda, vehemently denied it is a hate group in a statement Thursday.

Organizations like the AFA, which has two facilities in Illinois, have also said the SPLC lumps right wing organizations in with hate groups.

Nasatir says, citing ADL analysis, a majority of recent extremism-related deaths in America are a result of conservative fringe group activity, but concedes left-leaning organizations are capable of violence and hate as well.

Theres no question there are left forces that are dangerous and we need to be mindful of that, he said. You cant just focus on one.

Published at 9:45 PM CDT on Aug 18, 2017 | Updated at 12:56 AM CDT on Aug 19, 2017

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32 Hate Groups Call Illinois Home, Southern Poverty Law Center Says – NBC Chicago

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Southern Poverty Law Center identifies ‘hate groups’ in Utah – Deseret News

Screenshot, SPLC

Last week, chaos erupted in Charlottesville, Va., when a white nationalist group rallied, sparking protests and violence.

Last week, chaos erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, when a white nationalist group rallied, sparking protests and violence. Three people were killed, including one protester who was hit by a car and two police officers who died in a helicopter crash.

The Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center recently unveiled a map of what it identifies as “hate groups” in America, breaking them down by states.

Ryan Lenz, a senior investigative reporter for the law centers Hatewatch project, told KFOR in Oklahoma City that his team constantly looks for hate groups across the nation.

The team complies the list using publications and websites, law enforcement and civilian reports, and news reports. The groups include anti-LGBT organizations and those who dont believe in interracial marriage.

All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics, the law center explains.

There are 917 “hate groups” nationwide and Utah has three, according to the law center. They are the American Vanguard, the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (FLDS) and the National Socialist Movement.

For comparison, Texas has “55 active racist and separatist groups,” according to The Downtown Austin Patch.

American Vanguard is defined as a white nationalist group, while the National Socialist Movement is a neo-Nazi and National Socialist Movement group.

The FLDS group, listed as being headquartered in Hildale, Utah, is defined by the website as general hate, which means they espouse a variety of rather unique hateful doctrines and beliefs that are not easily categorized, according to the law center.

The mainstream LDS Church, or The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is headquartered in Salt Lake City and has 15 million members worldwide. This past week, the LDS Church condemned racism and “white supremacist attitudes.”

“We must strive to love one another as Christ loves us; to love all of our neighbors as ourselves, and to put that love into concrete action against violence, hatred and injustice,” the church said in a statement.

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Holocaust-denier Behind Twitter Threats Gets Probation | Southern … – Southern Poverty Law Center

David Joseph Lenio, a 31-year-old self-described white nationalist who said his ideal job would be operating a human gas chamber, also must undergo mental health treatment and not go within 1,000 feet of schools or Jewish synagogues.

He was fined $1,000 and ordered to have no contact with Jonathan Hutson, a Maryland communications consultant who first brought Lenios Twitter threats to the attention of the FBI in 2015.

I dont think theres any place in society for the things that youre saying, Kent County Circuit Court Judge Mark Trusock said from the bench, telling Lenio he has some very serious mental health issues.

God forbid that you would ever act out some of these things, the judge said.

Lenio chose not to address the court or offer any public apology or explanation for his behavior at the sentencing hearing.

In June, a jury in Kent County, Michigan, found Lenio guilty of malicious use of a telecommunications service, a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. He was found not guilty of two felony counts of aggravated stalking and using a computer to commit a crime.

Lenio, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, had served four months in jail after his arrest in February in his hometown.

You only talked about things that you wanted to do and I believe thats why the jury found you not guilty of the more serious charges, the judge told Lenio.

Lenio, an itinerant cook and son of a wealthy, influential Michigan banker, was initially arrested on Twitter-threat related charges in Flathead County, Montana, in 2015. But for unexplained reasons, the prosecutor there elected not to take the case to trial and deferred the criminal charges, allowing Lenio to return to his parents home in Grand Rapids.

Within weeks, he resumed firing off hate-filled, anti-Semitic tweets, asking at one point how much it would cost to buy a gun with enough ammunition to kill 99 school kids. In February he also tweeted that he would rather see 500 American Jews beheaded than to see one Holocaust denier spend five minutes in jail.

He also fired off tweets threatening Hutson. He tweeted that he was more full of hate and rage than ever and bent on revenge after serving five months in a Montana jail. Lenio was arrested in late February in Michigan on charges he used social media to terrorize, frighten, intimidate and harass Hutson in violation of the Montana court order.

Hutson reported Lenios threats and anti-Semitic tweets to Twitter, and he ultimately was banned from the social media platform.

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Tell President Trump to Take Responsibility for the Hate He’s Unleashed – Southern Poverty Law Center

President Trump’s campaign and presidency have energized the white supremacist movement in unprecedented ways. We saw it in the support he received from the likes of David Duke during his campaign. We saw it in the surge in hate crimes committed in his name after his election. And we saw it in the deadly gathering of white supremacists in Charlottesville this weekend.

At this point, it’s not enough for Trump simply to condemn bigotry. He must take responsibility for the surge in white supremacy and hate that he has unleashed. He must:

The events in Charlottesville demand nothing less.

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Tell President Trump to Take Responsibility for the Hate He’s Unleashed – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Reminder: The Southern Poverty Law Center is a fraud and nobody should treat them as responsible actors – Washington Examiner

Repeating a mistake made by many major media outlets before it, CNN on Thursday published a map of registered hate groups sourced entirely from the Southern Poverty Law Center, an irresponsible advocacy group that purports to operate as an objective assessor of hate. Just one day earlier, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced the company was set to make a $1 million donation to the SPLC as well.

But the SPLC’s claim to objectivity is nothing less than fraudulent, a reality that informed observers of its practices from both the Left and Right accept. The routine of debunking their supposedly objective classifications occurs like clockwork each time a major outlet makes the mistake of turning to them when reporting on the many conservative thinkers and nonprofits the group absurdly designates as hateful.

So here we go again.

The SPLC routinely lumps conservative advocacy groups in with legitimate hate organizations, putting proponents of traditional family values in the same category as neo-Nazis and the KKK. In a July note to supporters, the Family Research Council, a conservative nonprofit the SPLC has attacked, referred to the center as “a left wing smear group who has become exactly what they set out to fight, spreading hate and putting targets on people’s backs.”

And they’re exactly correct.

Five years ago, for instance, a gunman opened fire at FRC’s headquarters, leaving a security guard injured, in part because he saw the organization was listed as a hate group on the SPLC’s website.

In June, 41 conservative movement leaders sent a letter that addressed the matter, explaining that the SPLC’s “hate group’ list is nothing more than a political weapon targeting people it deems to be its political enemies.”

“The list is ad hoc, partisan, and agenda-driven,” the letter continued. “The SPLC doesn’t even pretend to identify groups on the political left that engage in hate.'”

In 2010, liberal journalist Ken Silverstein called the group “essentially a fraud” with “a habit of casually labeling organizations as hate groups.'”

“In doing so,” Silverstein wrote, “the SPLC shuts down debate, stifles free speech, and most of all, raises a pile of money, very little of which is used on behalf of poor people.” In 2000, Silverstein reported on the SPLC’s practice of exploiting tragedy with misleading fundraising efforts that allow it to amass tens of millions of dollars in donations.

In a column earlier this summer, the Washington Examiner’s Timothy P. Carney described how the liberal strategy of lumping mainstream conservatives in with extremists is a dangerous tack that can actually end up making legitimate hate groups seem more innocuous.

There are real consequences to the SPLC’s racketeering. At this point, there is just no excuse for major news outlets to cite their work.

Emily Jashinsky is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

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Reminder: The Southern Poverty Law Center is a fraud and nobody should treat them as responsible actors – Washington Examiner

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Send a letter: It’s time to take down Confederate monuments – Southern Poverty Law Center

Please send a Letter to the Editor to your local newspaper to take down the Confederate monuments in your community. Heres sample language you can use or, better, put it in your own words. Then fill out the form at the bottom of the page to let us know where youve sent it.

Together, we can make our communities safer and our country a placewhere liberty and justice are truly for all.

Dear editor,

White supremacists incited deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last week in defense of a Confederate monument. We must show the country that [your city’s or countys name] gives no safe harbor to such hatred. We must remove the monument at [location].

Confederate symbols on public land, in effect, endorse a movement founded on white supremacy. If our government continues to pay homage to the Confederacy, people of color can never be sure they will be treated fairly. And we will never solve our communitys problems if an entire group of citizens is alienated or feels targeted for discrimination.

Confederate symbols belong in museums and on private property. In museums, we can learn their full history. Citizens will always have the right to fly the Confederate flag. They can still erect monuments on their own property. That will not change.

But it is past time to move our monument to an appropriate place. [Your mayors or county commission presidents name], editors of [your local newspaper], [your member of Congress] and the rest of our community should research how to remove the monument. Then we should act.

Sincerely,

[Your name].

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Hatewatch Headlines 8/17/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Politico: World leaders condemn Trumps obnoxious remarks on neo-Nazis.

The Cypher Brief: Trumps rhetoric empowers dangerous fringe-right violence, expert warns.

Think Progress: There is no comparison between Black Lives Matter and white supremacists.

New York Magazine: Dont look now, but nine alt-right demonstrations are planned for nine cities this weekend.

Right Wing Watch: Charlottesville racists try to cover their tracks by denying rally violence, neo-Nazi presence.

PBS NewsHour: Matthew Heimbach excuses violence in Virginia by blaming the victim.

Washington Post: PayPal escalates the tech industrys war on white supremacy.

Gizmodo: Cloudflare CEO on terminating service to neo-Nazi site: The Daily Stormer are assholes.

The Outline: Squarespace is dropping Richard Spencers think tank and other alt-right websites.

The Hill: University of Florida blocks Richard Spencer event over safety concerns.

Media Matters: Colorado Mountain Resort cancels plans to host white-nationalist VDare conference after wide criticism.

New York Times: Trump lawyer forwards email echoing neo-Confederate secessionist rhetoric.

NBC News: Alt-right troll Jack Posobiec, retweeted by Trump, is a U.S. naval intelligence officer.

Talking Points Memo: Alabama attorney general sues Birmingham and its mayor over Confederate monument removal.

CNN: Man misidentified as Charlottesville driver has to flee home, plans lawsuit against alt-right websites.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (GA): Ku Klux Klan request to burn cross on Stone Mountain is denied.

San Francisco Examiner: Electrician no longer employed after speech at Charlottesville white-supremacist rally.

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Southern Poverty Law Center: At least 6 hate groups …

OKLAHOMA CITY At least six hate groups are operating in Oklahoma, according to a civil rights advocacy group.

Every year, the Southern Poverty Law Center releases a list of active hate groups operating across the country.

The SPLC defines a hate group as a group that has beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.

These groups activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meeting, leafleting or publishing.

According to the SPLC, there are 917 such groups operating in the United States; six of those are in Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma groups that made the SPLCs list include:

Although the number of hate groups has decreased in Oklahoma in recent years, the SPLC data shows hate groups have increased nation-wide:

The SPLC has documented an explosive rise in the number of hate groups since the turn of the century, driven in part by anger over Latino immigration and demographic projections showing that whites will no longer hold majority status in the country by around 2040. The rise accelerated in 2009, the year President Obama took office, but declined after that, in part because large numbers of extremists were moving to the web and away from on-the-ground activities. In the last two years, in part due to a presidential campaign that flirted heavily with extremist ideas, the hate group count has risen again.Read ourmost recent reportor see afull list of active hate groups.

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Will ACT for America Provide An Outlet for the ‘Alt-Right’ Post … – Southern Poverty Law Center

With a spate of event cancellations such as a protestagainst Google and scheduled appearances by Richard Spencer at two major universities ACT for America’s nation-wide America First rallies slated forSeptember 9 may bring the Alt-Rightto the streets once again. In June, ACT for America thelargest anti-Muslim group in the United States organized simultaneousMarch Against Shariah events across the country which wereattended by a plethora of racist groups, including two of the more prominent groups to appear in Charlottesville: The “blood and soil” fascist group Vanguard America (VA),and the white nationalist Identity Evropa (IE).Always quick to distance itself from racism, ACT sent an email to its followers denouncing the violence in Charlottesville,while at the same time promoting its rallies on September 9, claiming, any organizations or individuals advocating violence or hatred towards anyone based on race, religion, or affiliation are not welcome at this rally. At the New York City march on June 10, Richard Rivera, a Vanguard Americaspokesperson, attended and spoke to media, telling the Washington Post, I dont believe in having Muslims in the United States. Their culture is incompatible with ours. James Alex Fields, the alleged driver of the car that killed one and injured 20 when he plowed into counter-protesters in Charlottesville was pictured marching with Vanguard America, donning their attire and holding a shield with the VA logo. Fields with shield second from left. Identity Evropa, which hada heavy presence in Charlottesville, also attendedvarious ACT rallies on June 10. Identity Evropa is lead by Nathan Damigo, a former Marine corporal who discovered his inner white nationalist by reading the work of Holocaust-denying ex-Klansman David Duke while serving five years for armed robbery (while drunk, he put a gun to the head of a cab driver he thought was Iraqi and stole $43). At ACT’sIndianapolis March Against Shariah, Identity Evropas regional coordinator Jason Richardson spoke. In Orlando, IE members held up a large banner while listening to Holocaust-denier Augustus Sol Invictus and others speak. Damigo himself attending the Roseville, Californiarally. Nathan Damigo, founder of the white nationalist/identitarian group Identity Evropa, at an ACT For America rally in June. What attracts white nationalist groups to ACT is the groups vehemently anti-Muslim views. While ACT warns about Sharialaw replacing the Constitution and how Europe is being overrun by Muslims, the rallying cry for the racists who descended on Charlottesville was, You will not replace us! White nationalist Jason Kessler, the organizerof the rally took to Periscope in the week leading up to Charlottesville and stated, These people are trying to replace us with third-world immigrants, they are trying to replace us with Muslims. The closed Facebook group used in part to organize the ACT rallies not only contains posts that are sympathetic to Charlottesville, but also plenty of racist material. This is not the first time ACT hasattemptedto distance itself from white nationalist groups. Billy Roper, aprominent neo-Nazi for decades, had been officially charged with organizinga JuneACT rally inBatesville, Arkansas; ACTdropped him after the SPLC exposedhis racist past and current beliefs. In March, ACT was forced to fire a prominent chapter leader after remarks about killing Muslims were made public. Considering the common ground between overtly racist groups and ACTfor America, there is very little to indicate that Vanguard America, Identity Evropa and other white nationalists wont flock to the ACT rallies, which will betaking place in over 50 cities across the country. A flyer designed by Vanguard America (VA). VA was responsible for over 40 flyering drops in 2017 featuring flyers like this one. VA appeared at an ACT For America rally in June, along with other racist ‘alt-right’ groups.

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32 Hate Groups Call Illinois Home, Southern Poverty Law Center Says – NBC Chicago

At a press event that was supposed to focus on infrastructure, President Donald Trump answered questions about violence that erupted at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. He again blamed both sides for violence and described counter-protesters as the “alt-left.” (Published Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017) From a white power record label in Burbank to an Aryan motorcycle club in Canton, there are 32 active hate groups in the state of Illinois, according to the Southern Poverty Law Centera nonprofit advocating against extremism. While the nations history is wrought with examples of racism and bigotry, groups like the SPLC are sounding the alarm over current eventssuch as the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last weekend. A 32-year-old woman was killed and 15 people were injured after a car rammed into a crowd of counter-protesters. Another nonprofit, the Anti-Defamation League, expressed concern ahead of the so-called Unite the Right rally and said it was possibly the largest white supremacist gathering in a decade. Illinois is no stranger to such demonstrations. In 1978, a neo-Nazi group planned to march in Skokie where a large Jewish population, including Holocaust survivors, resides. The Nazis instead marched in Marquette Park in Chicago where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once lived. Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who was among those rallying against the Nazis at the time, called it a political awakening in a recent statement rebuking President Donald Trumps failure to squarely blame white supremacists for Virginias spate of violence. The SPLCs digital Hate Map, an interactive feature on its website cataloging what it calls extremist and fringe groups, has been circulated widely on social media in recent days in response to the events in Charlottesville. SPLC officials did not respond to request for comment. On its website, the organization details why it has included the groups on its map. Lonnie Nasatir, the Midwest regional director for the ADL, says hate groups in Illinois today are fluid, often quickly dissolving and hard to track. Theyre very hard to quantify, he said in a phone interview, adding that the 32 listed by the SPLC is a good ballpark number. The ADL says white supremacists and extremists have renewed attempts to insert their hatred in a number of towns and cities across the country, placing much of the blame on rhetoric coming from the Trump White House. The president has faced heavy criticism since his insistence that the Charlottesville violence was stoked by both sides, though he has denounced Nazis, the KKK and white supremacists in scripted comments. Trumps statements, however, have garnered the praise of former KKK grand wizard David Duke and white nationalist icon Richard Spencer. Unfortunately we didnt get the denunciation we were looking for from the president, Nasatir said. My fear is that theyve (white supremacists) again been emboldened and are feeling empowered to go to the next rally. Nasatir said groups like the ADL and SPLC are staying vigilant in the fight against extremism and hate. He said his organization is communicating with law enforcement about its findings all the time. The Federal Bureau of Investigation says it does at times investigate domestic hate groups but does not actively track them. Our focus is not on membership in particular groups or adherence to particular ideologies or beliefs but on criminal activity, said FBI spokeswoman Diane Carbonara. The FBI cannot initiate an investigation based solely on an individuals race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, or the exercise of the First Amendment or other Constitutional rights, and we remain committed to protecting those rights for all Americans. In interviews given since the chaos in Charlottesville, some marchers said they were only there to protest the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Leewhile others openly professed their racist beliefs. Still, not everyone agrees with the SPLCs findings. The village of Gurnee, reportedly home to a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, has requested to be removed from the Hate Map. Gurnee police told the Lake County News-Sun there has been no record of Klan activity in the area since 1987. The American Family Association, a conservative advocacy group defending natural marriage and resisting the aggressive, radical, homosexual agenda, vehemently denied it is a hate group in a statement Thursday. Organizations like the AFA, which has two facilities in Illinois, have also said the SPLC lumps right wing organizations in with hate groups. Nasatir says, citing ADL analysis, a majority of recent extremism-related deaths in America are a result of conservative fringe group activity, but concedes left-leaning organizations are capable of violence and hate as well. Theres no question there are left forces that are dangerous and we need to be mindful of that, he said. You cant just focus on one. Published at 9:45 PM CDT on Aug 18, 2017 | Updated at 12:56 AM CDT on Aug 19, 2017

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Southern Poverty Law Center identifies ‘hate groups’ in Utah – Deseret News

Screenshot, SPLC Last week, chaos erupted in Charlottesville, Va., when a white nationalist group rallied, sparking protests and violence. Last week, chaos erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, when a white nationalist group rallied, sparking protests and violence. Three people were killed, including one protester who was hit by a car and two police officers who died in a helicopter crash. The Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center recently unveiled a map of what it identifies as “hate groups” in America, breaking them down by states. Ryan Lenz, a senior investigative reporter for the law centers Hatewatch project, told KFOR in Oklahoma City that his team constantly looks for hate groups across the nation. The team complies the list using publications and websites, law enforcement and civilian reports, and news reports. The groups include anti-LGBT organizations and those who dont believe in interracial marriage. All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics, the law center explains. There are 917 “hate groups” nationwide and Utah has three, according to the law center. They are the American Vanguard, the Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints (FLDS) and the National Socialist Movement. For comparison, Texas has “55 active racist and separatist groups,” according to The Downtown Austin Patch. American Vanguard is defined as a white nationalist group, while the National Socialist Movement is a neo-Nazi and National Socialist Movement group. The FLDS group, listed as being headquartered in Hildale, Utah, is defined by the website as general hate, which means they espouse a variety of rather unique hateful doctrines and beliefs that are not easily categorized, according to the law center. The mainstream LDS Church, or The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is headquartered in Salt Lake City and has 15 million members worldwide. This past week, the LDS Church condemned racism and “white supremacist attitudes.” “We must strive to love one another as Christ loves us; to love all of our neighbors as ourselves, and to put that love into concrete action against violence, hatred and injustice,” the church said in a statement.

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Holocaust-denier Behind Twitter Threats Gets Probation | Southern … – Southern Poverty Law Center

David Joseph Lenio, a 31-year-old self-described white nationalist who said his ideal job would be operating a human gas chamber, also must undergo mental health treatment and not go within 1,000 feet of schools or Jewish synagogues. He was fined $1,000 and ordered to have no contact with Jonathan Hutson, a Maryland communications consultant who first brought Lenios Twitter threats to the attention of the FBI in 2015. I dont think theres any place in society for the things that youre saying, Kent County Circuit Court Judge Mark Trusock said from the bench, telling Lenio he has some very serious mental health issues. God forbid that you would ever act out some of these things, the judge said. Lenio chose not to address the court or offer any public apology or explanation for his behavior at the sentencing hearing. In June, a jury in Kent County, Michigan, found Lenio guilty of malicious use of a telecommunications service, a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. He was found not guilty of two felony counts of aggravated stalking and using a computer to commit a crime. Lenio, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, had served four months in jail after his arrest in February in his hometown. You only talked about things that you wanted to do and I believe thats why the jury found you not guilty of the more serious charges, the judge told Lenio. Lenio, an itinerant cook and son of a wealthy, influential Michigan banker, was initially arrested on Twitter-threat related charges in Flathead County, Montana, in 2015. But for unexplained reasons, the prosecutor there elected not to take the case to trial and deferred the criminal charges, allowing Lenio to return to his parents home in Grand Rapids. Within weeks, he resumed firing off hate-filled, anti-Semitic tweets, asking at one point how much it would cost to buy a gun with enough ammunition to kill 99 school kids. In February he also tweeted that he would rather see 500 American Jews beheaded than to see one Holocaust denier spend five minutes in jail. He also fired off tweets threatening Hutson. He tweeted that he was more full of hate and rage than ever and bent on revenge after serving five months in a Montana jail. Lenio was arrested in late February in Michigan on charges he used social media to terrorize, frighten, intimidate and harass Hutson in violation of the Montana court order. Hutson reported Lenios threats and anti-Semitic tweets to Twitter, and he ultimately was banned from the social media platform.

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Tell President Trump to Take Responsibility for the Hate He’s Unleashed – Southern Poverty Law Center

President Trump’s campaign and presidency have energized the white supremacist movement in unprecedented ways. We saw it in the support he received from the likes of David Duke during his campaign. We saw it in the surge in hate crimes committed in his name after his election. And we saw it in the deadly gathering of white supremacists in Charlottesville this weekend. At this point, it’s not enough for Trump simply to condemn bigotry. He must take responsibility for the surge in white supremacy and hate that he has unleashed. He must: The events in Charlottesville demand nothing less.

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Reminder: The Southern Poverty Law Center is a fraud and nobody should treat them as responsible actors – Washington Examiner

Repeating a mistake made by many major media outlets before it, CNN on Thursday published a map of registered hate groups sourced entirely from the Southern Poverty Law Center, an irresponsible advocacy group that purports to operate as an objective assessor of hate. Just one day earlier, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced the company was set to make a $1 million donation to the SPLC as well. But the SPLC’s claim to objectivity is nothing less than fraudulent, a reality that informed observers of its practices from both the Left and Right accept. The routine of debunking their supposedly objective classifications occurs like clockwork each time a major outlet makes the mistake of turning to them when reporting on the many conservative thinkers and nonprofits the group absurdly designates as hateful. So here we go again. The SPLC routinely lumps conservative advocacy groups in with legitimate hate organizations, putting proponents of traditional family values in the same category as neo-Nazis and the KKK. In a July note to supporters, the Family Research Council, a conservative nonprofit the SPLC has attacked, referred to the center as “a left wing smear group who has become exactly what they set out to fight, spreading hate and putting targets on people’s backs.” And they’re exactly correct. Five years ago, for instance, a gunman opened fire at FRC’s headquarters, leaving a security guard injured, in part because he saw the organization was listed as a hate group on the SPLC’s website. In June, 41 conservative movement leaders sent a letter that addressed the matter, explaining that the SPLC’s “hate group’ list is nothing more than a political weapon targeting people it deems to be its political enemies.” “The list is ad hoc, partisan, and agenda-driven,” the letter continued. “The SPLC doesn’t even pretend to identify groups on the political left that engage in hate.'” In 2010, liberal journalist Ken Silverstein called the group “essentially a fraud” with “a habit of casually labeling organizations as hate groups.'” “In doing so,” Silverstein wrote, “the SPLC shuts down debate, stifles free speech, and most of all, raises a pile of money, very little of which is used on behalf of poor people.” In 2000, Silverstein reported on the SPLC’s practice of exploiting tragedy with misleading fundraising efforts that allow it to amass tens of millions of dollars in donations. In a column earlier this summer, the Washington Examiner’s Timothy P. Carney described how the liberal strategy of lumping mainstream conservatives in with extremists is a dangerous tack that can actually end up making legitimate hate groups seem more innocuous. There are real consequences to the SPLC’s racketeering. At this point, there is just no excuse for major news outlets to cite their work. Emily Jashinsky is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Send a letter: It’s time to take down Confederate monuments – Southern Poverty Law Center

Please send a Letter to the Editor to your local newspaper to take down the Confederate monuments in your community. Heres sample language you can use or, better, put it in your own words. Then fill out the form at the bottom of the page to let us know where youve sent it. Together, we can make our communities safer and our country a placewhere liberty and justice are truly for all. Dear editor, White supremacists incited deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last week in defense of a Confederate monument. We must show the country that [your city’s or countys name] gives no safe harbor to such hatred. We must remove the monument at [location]. Confederate symbols on public land, in effect, endorse a movement founded on white supremacy. If our government continues to pay homage to the Confederacy, people of color can never be sure they will be treated fairly. And we will never solve our communitys problems if an entire group of citizens is alienated or feels targeted for discrimination. Confederate symbols belong in museums and on private property. In museums, we can learn their full history. Citizens will always have the right to fly the Confederate flag. They can still erect monuments on their own property. That will not change. But it is past time to move our monument to an appropriate place. [Your mayors or county commission presidents name], editors of [your local newspaper], [your member of Congress] and the rest of our community should research how to remove the monument. Then we should act. Sincerely, [Your name].

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Hatewatch Headlines 8/17/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Politico: World leaders condemn Trumps obnoxious remarks on neo-Nazis. The Cypher Brief: Trumps rhetoric empowers dangerous fringe-right violence, expert warns. Think Progress: There is no comparison between Black Lives Matter and white supremacists. New York Magazine: Dont look now, but nine alt-right demonstrations are planned for nine cities this weekend. Right Wing Watch: Charlottesville racists try to cover their tracks by denying rally violence, neo-Nazi presence. PBS NewsHour: Matthew Heimbach excuses violence in Virginia by blaming the victim. Washington Post: PayPal escalates the tech industrys war on white supremacy. Gizmodo: Cloudflare CEO on terminating service to neo-Nazi site: The Daily Stormer are assholes. The Outline: Squarespace is dropping Richard Spencers think tank and other alt-right websites. The Hill: University of Florida blocks Richard Spencer event over safety concerns. Media Matters: Colorado Mountain Resort cancels plans to host white-nationalist VDare conference after wide criticism. New York Times: Trump lawyer forwards email echoing neo-Confederate secessionist rhetoric. NBC News: Alt-right troll Jack Posobiec, retweeted by Trump, is a U.S. naval intelligence officer. Talking Points Memo: Alabama attorney general sues Birmingham and its mayor over Confederate monument removal. CNN: Man misidentified as Charlottesville driver has to flee home, plans lawsuit against alt-right websites. Atlanta Journal-Constitution (GA): Ku Klux Klan request to burn cross on Stone Mountain is denied. San Francisco Examiner: Electrician no longer employed after speech at Charlottesville white-supremacist rally.

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Southern Poverty Law Center: At least 6 hate groups …

OKLAHOMA CITY At least six hate groups are operating in Oklahoma, according to a civil rights advocacy group. Every year, the Southern Poverty Law Center releases a list of active hate groups operating across the country. The SPLC defines a hate group as a group that has beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics. These groups activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meeting, leafleting or publishing. According to the SPLC, there are 917 such groups operating in the United States; six of those are in Oklahoma. The Oklahoma groups that made the SPLCs list include: Although the number of hate groups has decreased in Oklahoma in recent years, the SPLC data shows hate groups have increased nation-wide: The SPLC has documented an explosive rise in the number of hate groups since the turn of the century, driven in part by anger over Latino immigration and demographic projections showing that whites will no longer hold majority status in the country by around 2040. The rise accelerated in 2009, the year President Obama took office, but declined after that, in part because large numbers of extremists were moving to the web and away from on-the-ground activities. In the last two years, in part due to a presidential campaign that flirted heavily with extremist ideas, the hate group count has risen again.Read ourmost recent reportor see afull list of active hate groups.

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August 16, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed


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