Archive for the ‘Southern Poverty Law Center’ Category

Hatewatch Headlines 2/9/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Media Matters: One type of terrorism really is underreported from the radical right.

Raw Story: Georgia white supremacist under FBI investigation after police find evidence of ricin in his car.

ProPublica: When the government really did fear a Bowling Green massacre by a white supremacist.

Slate: Heres a list of 39 white terrorists for the Wisconsin congressman who challenged CNN to name more than two.

Right Wing Watch: Donald Trump keeps promoting Alex Jones conspiracy theories.

Associated Press: Twitter broadens its campaign against hate and abuse by identifying key offenders.

Think Progress: Congress moves to restrict public input on planning for land use in the West.

KEYE-TV (Austin, TX): More and more Texans are digging their bomb shelters deep as they prepare for doomsday.

Courier-Journal (Louisville, TN): Heimbachs plans for Traditionalist Worker Party gathering at state park create a stir.

CBS New York: Connecticut residents find Make America White Again supremacist fliers in their neighborhoods.

Reuters: Idaho man pleads guilty in brutal beating death of gay man lured to remote location.

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FBI Investigates White Supremacist for Deadly Poison – Southern Poverty Law Center

William Christopher Gibb.

William Christopher Gibbs, 27, of Morganton, Georgia, was arrested on state charges of reckless conduct and probation violation after going to a local hospital late last week, ABC News reported.

His hospitalization triggered 100 police and hazardous material experts to respond and search Gibbs home and car for traces of the poison. Fannin County Sheriff Dane Kirby confirmed a search of Gibbs car tested positive for ricin.

I think it was all contained inside his vehicle, just a small amount of something I think he had been experimenting with, the Georgia sheriff told an Atlanta television station.

In their report, sheriffs deputies said that the suspects mother said he suffers from mental illness.

The FBI hasnt commented other than to confirm agents are investigating Gibbsbackground and how he came into possession of ricin, a relatively easy to produce toxin rendered from castor beans.

Gibbs also faces the possibility of more serious federal charges.

John A. Horn, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Georgia, said in a written statement that investigators have found no evidence that any poisonous or toxic substances have been dispersed or that the public is at risk.

We are coordinating with the 4th Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team of the Army National Guard and the Cherokee County Fire Department to ensure that the area is safe, Horn said.

Gibbs claims membership in the Georgia Church of Creativity, a white supremacy sect that professes race is our religion, that the white race is natures finest, and that racial loyalty is the greatest of all honors, and racial treason is the worst of all crimes.

This is not the first time ricin has been linked to racists and antigovernment extremists in Georgia. In 2014, two men who were members of a militia group were sentenced to prison for their involvement in a plot to make the deadly poison ricin and disperse it in several cities.

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FBI Investigates White Supremacist for Deadly Poison – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Florida Man Gets 30 Years for Hate-Arson at Mosque – Southern Poverty Law Center

A man who posted anti-Muslim rants online before setting fire to a mosque in Fort Pierce, Florida, on the anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, now faces 30 years in prison.

Joseph Michael Schreiber, 32, entered a no contest plea yesterday in state court after being charged with arson with a hatecrime enhancement.

The fire heavily damaged the Islamic Center of Fort Pierce, where Omar Mateen, who carried out a mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub, had worshipped. The damage was so extensive that mosque leaders say they will move to a new location.

The crime came during last years presidential campaign, as Muslims across the United States faced a hostile political climate and were increasingly targeted by threats.

Surveillance video, which ultimately led to Schreibers arrest, showed a man carrying a bottle of liquid and a handful of paper just moments before the fire broke out.

Before the arson, Schreiber, who is Jewish, posted on Facebook that all Islam is radical and that all Muslims should be treated as terrorists and criminals.

Prosecutor Steve Gosnell said Schreiber confessed to setting the fire, telling detectives that he believed Muslims are trying to infiltrate our government and that the teaching of Islam should be completely, completely illegal, The Associated Press reported.

In court, Schreiber read a statement claiming the hate did not drive him to start the fire,but ratheranxiety. He said he feared another attack like those of 9-11, the Boston Marathon bombing or the Pulse nightclub shooting last June in Orlando.

My message is this to all the Muslim communities on the face of the Earth make peace with America and make peace with Israel and stop the killings, stop the attacks, Schreiber said in court, according to various media accounts.

He then turned to mosque member Mohammad Malik, seated in the courtroom, and apologized.

After the hearing, Malik told reporters that he believes Schreiber was misled by fear-mongering (and) false information being spread by Islamophobes. A bright spot that resulted from the arson attack, Malik said, is that local Jewish and Islamic communities are now communicating.

In the Islamic faith and in all faiths, we believe that God is merciful. And just as we want to be forgiven by him,we should also forgive, Malik told reporters.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/3/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Newsweek: Stephen Bannon harbors fever dream of an American gulag in the Southwest desert and Trump enacts it.

The Progressive: New documentsreveal the stark Islamophobia of Stephen Miller, the man behind Trumps Muslim ban.

Electronic Intifada: Email from 2007 ties Miller to white nationalist Richard Spencer.

Salon: Trumps war on Islam shows how anti-Muslim extremists hold sway in the White House.

Think Progress: Sean Spicer asked about domestic terrorism, but cant stop talking about border security.

BuzzFeed: Federal wildlife and land managers say they now fear for their safety due to antigovernment hatred.

Mother Jones: Could anti-immigrant hardliner Julie Kirchner land a top Border Patrol spot?

Associated Press: Jury convicts white nationalist who wounded Black Lives Matter protesters in Minneapolis.

KPRC-TV (Houston, TX): High school students pose with Nazi salute, some shout Heil Trump and Heil Hitler.

CNN: Milo Yiannopoulos is trying to convince colleges that hate speech is cool.

Right Wing Watch: World Net Daily columnist Harvey says feminists worship a goddess who requires child sacrifice.

Houston Chronicle: Whitesupremacist American Vanguard group hangs fliers around Rice University campus.

Raw Story: Witnesses say L.A.woman yelled White power! before attacking elderly Korean pedestrian.

The New York Times: Even as hate spreads online, KKK fliers show up on neighborhood lawns in Maine.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/3/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Southern Poverty Law Center speaker to present Feb. 13 at CWU – Daily Record-News

Central Washington University will play host to Southern Poverty Law Center Outreach Director Lecia Brooks during a series of campus discussions on Feb. 13, according to a news release. Brooks spoke at a panel discussion at CWU via Skype in November.

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Building off a Not in Our Kittitas County event in November, Part 2 of “Building Respectful Communities: Transcending Hate,” is at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 13 in the Student Union and Recreation Center Ballroom. According to the release, Brooks will give historical context of the recent hate group activity in Kittitas County, as well as share SLPC data on hate incidents that have occurred since the presidential election.

The Not in Our Kittitas County campaign followed Ku Klux Klan activity locally. Brooks’ presentation is sponsored by CWU and Not In Our KittCo.

Two other events are planned on campus, one for faculty and staff and one for students.

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Southern Poverty Law Center speaker to present Feb. 13 at CWU – Daily Record-News

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/7/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Slate: A white nationalist governmentis upon us, and it could set us back 150 years.

Newsweek: The extremist Islamophobes at the heart of Donald Trumps White House.

Truthout: Trumps proposed change to terrorism program would give green light to whitesupremacist violence.

Forward: How Trump empowers white supremacists and jihadis alike.

Los Angeles Times: In an age of alternate facts and Alex Jones, a massacre of schoolchildren becomes a hoax.

Media Matters: How Stephen Bannon gets away with bringing white supremacy to Trumps Oval Office.

Wired: Neo-Nazis face a new foe online and in real life the far-left antifa movement.

ProPublica: Claims of homosexual agenda help kill hate-crimes laws in five states.

Huffington Post: From Holocaust denial to Hitler admiration, Googles algorithm is proving dangerous.

Teen Vogue: What you need to know about hate speech and free speech, and the distinctions that matter.

KFGO-TV (Fargo, ND): White supremacist Craig Cobb eyes abandoned church in tiny town of Nome.

Associated Press: Ex-convict who torched Orlando mosque after massacre gets 30-year prison sentence.

MLive (Dearborn, MI): Masked open-carry advocate arrested after carrying rifle into police station.

Political Research Associates: Pro-LGBT claims are being used as a smokescreen for anti-Muslim attacks.

The Guardian (UK): How Richard Spencers hometown in Montana weathered a neo-Nazi troll storm.

Washington Post: New Yorkers get out their hand sanitizers and erase subway swastikas.

AOL.com: Richard Spencer deems Patriots Super Bowl victory a win for the white race.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/7/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

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American antigovernment movement rooted in nation’s past – Southern Poverty Law Center

The special merit of the film is that it looks seriously at the antecedents of the worst domestic terrorist attack in American history the rise of revolutionary right-wing groups like The Order in the 1980s, the deadly standoffs in the early 1990s on Ruby Ridge, Idaho, and near Waco, Texas, and the gun control measures introduced by President Bill Clinton in 1994. These threads are described in fulsome detail.

But the radical antigovernment movement that produced Timothy McVeigh and accomplices Terry Nichols and Michael Fortier goes back even further. It may be a worthy addition to Goodmans work to explore this long, historical arc.

In the widest sense, antigovernment fervor in the United States begins with the birth of the nation in the throes of a revolution against a far-off and imperious monarch. Unlike European nations, which historically looked to government to solve the peoples problems, Americans would go on to develop a sense of going it alone and preferring that the government keep its nose out of their business.

The examples start early. In 1786, just three years after the Revolutionary War ended, Shays Rebellion, driven by tax and other economic injustices, broke out in Massachusetts. Five years after that, in 1791, farmers in Western Pennsylvania, infuriated by a steep tax on whiskey, launched the Whiskey Rebellion. Both were nourished by the idea of a government estranged from the peoples interests.

That sense was further strengthened by the realities of life on the frontier, where survival more often than not depended on the wits of individual pioneers and the use they could make of their guns. Government support and even charity were scarce to nonexistent, and self-reliance became a peculiarly American virtue.

As the decades passed, the federal government also came increasingly to be seen as the overbearing enemy of the countrys extreme right. After the Civil War, after all, it was the government that militarily occupied the South, set up freedmens bureaus and gave former slaves their citizenship. In the 1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelts New Deal created the beginnings of a real government safety net, which also ushered in the age of modern taxation. During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the government once again was viewed by the radical right as an enemy that was helping minorities and curtailing the powers of the majority.

The pattern continued into the contemporary era. The Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1970s and the Wise Use movement of the 1980s, both of them aimed at forcing the federal government to turn public lands over to local communities and allowing their commercial exploitation, gave a new boost to antigovernment feeling, with many believing the government cared more for spotted owls than humans.

President Ronald Reagan, in his first, 1981 inaugural address, gave specific shape to this resentment, asserting that government is not the solution for our problem; government is the problem. Twenty years later, a similar quote, from anti-tax activist Grover Norquist, famously recapitulated that antigovernment view. I dont want to abolish government, Norquist said then. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into bathroom and drown it in the bathtub.

The identification of the government as an enemy of the far right solidified with the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall and the subsequent dissolution of the Soviet Union. The American radical right, deprived of the bogeyman of communism, looked for a new enemy and found it in the government. This was, in a real way, the culmination of the antigovernment trend that began during the Revolution.

By the time of the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, fully 39% of the American people agreed with the proposition that the federal government was so large and powerful that it poses an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary citizens. Since the bombing, that remarkable percentage has grown to shocking proportions 52% in 2001 and almost six in 10 Americans in 2010.

Goodman is absolutely right to point to the events at Ruby Ridge and Waco, among others, as proximate causes for McVeighs horrific mass murder. And he is right, as the film points out clearly, to note that the bombers were a product of the white nationalist movement, just as much as the antigovernment movement.

But while there are similarities between the Oklahoma City bombing and similar kinds of attacks in Europe, the 1995 outrage in Americas heartland was to a very large extent the product of a uniquely American history and culture.

Mark Potok is a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center and the editor in chief of its investigative magazine, Intelligence Report. As a reporter at USA Today, he covered the Waco standoff, the birth of the militia movement, the Oklahoma City bombing and the trial of Timothy McVeigh. Potok was recently interviewed for the American Experience film Oklahoma City, which debuts PBS on Feb. 7.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/6/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Think Progress: White supremacists celebrate reports of dialed-down scrutiny: Trump is setting us free.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (MO): Words you will never hear from Donald Trump: Radical right-wing terrorism.

CNN: Facts still matter when it comes to the nature of the terrorist threat facing Americans.

The Guardian (UK): Jewish community centers in U.S. receive nearly 50 bomb threats so far in 2017.

Chicago Tribune: Steve Bannon film outlinewarned that U.S. could turn into Islamic States of America.

New York Times: Court documents reveal that Dylann Roof had a variety of mental disorders at the time of his trial.

WMBF-TV (Myrtle Beach, SC): Craigslist ad talks about recruiting white men for war against minorities in defense of Trump.

Oregonian: Four of seven remaining Malheur Refuge takeover defendants plead guilty to trespass.

KDVR-TV (Denver, CO): Colorado mosque warned Department of Homeland Security about man who shot security officer.

BuzzFeed: Amazon employees are trying to force the company to cut its ties to Breitbart News.

Raw Story: Eatery customers leave note saying they liked the food, but Owner Mexican. We will not return. America First!

New York Magazine: Violence and rioting in protest is exactly what Milo Yiannopoulos wants.

Washington Post: Koran-burning preacher Terry Jones has been driving for Uber.

Huffington Post: Teacher suspended after she rescinded college letter for student who made swastika, talked Hitler.

Talking Points Memo: Confederate flag going back up at South Carolina monument.

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Daily Stormer Targets Federal Judges Ruling Against Trump’s Muslim Ban – Southern Poverty Law Center

Andrew Anglin, publisher of the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer, a prominent clearinghouse of racist Alt-Right editorials and memes, called for the military to arrest treasonous U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly in Manhattan for trying to flood America with terrorists and has called for martial law if other judges follow suit.

We have a problem, Anglin wrote over the weekend. Trump needs to arrest this woman immediately and have her charged with treason. If other judges protest, he needs to declare martial law and have them all rounded up and interned. We are at war here. This isnt a game.

Anglin stopped short of threatening Donnolly directly, but in an update, he called for Trump to deploy the National Guard to the protest sites at airports across the country and shut them down completely.

Such posturing isnt new for Anglin, or for that matter, unexpected.

Just last month, he planned but later abandoned an armed protest in Whitefish, Montana, after the mother of Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute came under community pressure for failing to condemn her sons views. Anglin published the personal information of members of Love Lives Here, a non-profit in Montanas Flathead Valley that addresses hate and extremism a retaliatory tactic used by online trolls, known as doxxing.

Anglin didnt publish Donnellys personal information. But one reader, posting under the name forbesmag, provided the federal judges home phone number, her husbands name and a message: Traitorous idiot scum judge Ann Marie Donnelly, appointed by the fake nigger president from Kenya, on the recommendation of kike senator Chuck Schumer. As of Wednesday, Daily Stormer administrators had not removed the comment.

Far-right extremists often use doxxing to intimidate their perceived enemies, including judges.

Craig Cobb, the white supremacist who in 2013 attempted to establish an enclave of racists in North Dakota, took issue more than a decade ago with U.S. District Judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow after she ruled against the World Church of the Creator in a trademark infringement suit in 2000. Group leader Matthew Hale was arrested for soliciting Lefkows murder. He was convicted and sentenced to 40 years in prison, where he remains.

In retaliation, Cobb, a follower of the Creativity Movement, published Lefkows home address and a map to its location on the Internet. He also posted pictures of Lefkows husband and children on Stormfront, until recently the worlds largest white supremacist website.

Two years after that, in 2005, Lefkows husband and mother were murdered inside her Chicago house. The killer was not involved in white supremacy but was angry over Lefkows ruling in another case.

Another white supremacist, Hal Turner, a one-time racist radio host who also served as an FBI informant, was charged in June 2009 with threatening to assault and murder three federal judges. He listed their work addresses and photos on his blog, writing, These Judges deserve to be killed. After two mistrials stemming from juror confusion about his FBI role, Turner was found guilty in August 2010 of threatening to assault and murder the judges. He was sentenced to 25 months and was released from prison in 2012.Trumps executive order indefinitely bars Syrian refugees from entering the United States and suspends the entry of all refugees for 120 days. It also blocks citizens and refugees of seven Muslim-majority countries Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States for 90 days.

In reporting on international travel problems, The New York Time wrote, The global confusion that since erupted is the story of a White House that rushed to enact, with little regard for basic governing, a core campaign promise that Mr. Trump made to his most fervent supporters.

Those supporters go far beyond the rank-and-file of the mainstream American conservative movement. They include extremists like Anglin, who gave Trump the moniker Our Glorious Leader during the campaign and, for a time, branded his website the most trusted Republican site on the web.

Its no surprise why. Building a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico and barring refugees from war-torn, predominantly Muslim countries are ideas that energized the white nationalist movement during the campaign.

Rebranding itself as the Alt-Right to escape the political baggage the ideology had acquired through the years, the movement heard in Trumps promise a solution to what it saw as a threat to America immigration.

Now, in what the racist right calls Trumpmerica, fringe figures like Anglin have gained a new prominence, though remain far outside the mainstream.

Anglin has warned, time and time again, that there is no room under Trump for dissent, not even if it comes from the judiciary.

Trump swore to protect this nation from enemies foreign and domestic, and in this case, you have a domestic enemy protecting a foreign one, Anglin wrote. We have to shut it down. For great justice.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/9/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Media Matters: One type of terrorism really is underreported from the radical right. Raw Story: Georgia white supremacist under FBI investigation after police find evidence of ricin in his car. ProPublica: When the government really did fear a Bowling Green massacre by a white supremacist. Slate: Heres a list of 39 white terrorists for the Wisconsin congressman who challenged CNN to name more than two. Right Wing Watch: Donald Trump keeps promoting Alex Jones conspiracy theories. Associated Press: Twitter broadens its campaign against hate and abuse by identifying key offenders. Think Progress: Congress moves to restrict public input on planning for land use in the West. KEYE-TV (Austin, TX): More and more Texans are digging their bomb shelters deep as they prepare for doomsday. Courier-Journal (Louisville, TN): Heimbachs plans for Traditionalist Worker Party gathering at state park create a stir. CBS New York: Connecticut residents find Make America White Again supremacist fliers in their neighborhoods. Reuters: Idaho man pleads guilty in brutal beating death of gay man lured to remote location.

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FBI Investigates White Supremacist for Deadly Poison – Southern Poverty Law Center

William Christopher Gibb. William Christopher Gibbs, 27, of Morganton, Georgia, was arrested on state charges of reckless conduct and probation violation after going to a local hospital late last week, ABC News reported. His hospitalization triggered 100 police and hazardous material experts to respond and search Gibbs home and car for traces of the poison. Fannin County Sheriff Dane Kirby confirmed a search of Gibbs car tested positive for ricin. I think it was all contained inside his vehicle, just a small amount of something I think he had been experimenting with, the Georgia sheriff told an Atlanta television station. In their report, sheriffs deputies said that the suspects mother said he suffers from mental illness. The FBI hasnt commented other than to confirm agents are investigating Gibbsbackground and how he came into possession of ricin, a relatively easy to produce toxin rendered from castor beans. Gibbs also faces the possibility of more serious federal charges. John A. Horn, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Georgia, said in a written statement that investigators have found no evidence that any poisonous or toxic substances have been dispersed or that the public is at risk. We are coordinating with the 4th Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team of the Army National Guard and the Cherokee County Fire Department to ensure that the area is safe, Horn said. Gibbs claims membership in the Georgia Church of Creativity, a white supremacy sect that professes race is our religion, that the white race is natures finest, and that racial loyalty is the greatest of all honors, and racial treason is the worst of all crimes. This is not the first time ricin has been linked to racists and antigovernment extremists in Georgia. In 2014, two men who were members of a militia group were sentenced to prison for their involvement in a plot to make the deadly poison ricin and disperse it in several cities.

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Florida Man Gets 30 Years for Hate-Arson at Mosque – Southern Poverty Law Center

A man who posted anti-Muslim rants online before setting fire to a mosque in Fort Pierce, Florida, on the anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, now faces 30 years in prison. Joseph Michael Schreiber, 32, entered a no contest plea yesterday in state court after being charged with arson with a hatecrime enhancement. The fire heavily damaged the Islamic Center of Fort Pierce, where Omar Mateen, who carried out a mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub, had worshipped. The damage was so extensive that mosque leaders say they will move to a new location. The crime came during last years presidential campaign, as Muslims across the United States faced a hostile political climate and were increasingly targeted by threats. Surveillance video, which ultimately led to Schreibers arrest, showed a man carrying a bottle of liquid and a handful of paper just moments before the fire broke out. Before the arson, Schreiber, who is Jewish, posted on Facebook that all Islam is radical and that all Muslims should be treated as terrorists and criminals. Prosecutor Steve Gosnell said Schreiber confessed to setting the fire, telling detectives that he believed Muslims are trying to infiltrate our government and that the teaching of Islam should be completely, completely illegal, The Associated Press reported. In court, Schreiber read a statement claiming the hate did not drive him to start the fire,but ratheranxiety. He said he feared another attack like those of 9-11, the Boston Marathon bombing or the Pulse nightclub shooting last June in Orlando. My message is this to all the Muslim communities on the face of the Earth make peace with America and make peace with Israel and stop the killings, stop the attacks, Schreiber said in court, according to various media accounts. He then turned to mosque member Mohammad Malik, seated in the courtroom, and apologized. After the hearing, Malik told reporters that he believes Schreiber was misled by fear-mongering (and) false information being spread by Islamophobes. A bright spot that resulted from the arson attack, Malik said, is that local Jewish and Islamic communities are now communicating. In the Islamic faith and in all faiths, we believe that God is merciful. And just as we want to be forgiven by him,we should also forgive, Malik told reporters.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/3/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Newsweek: Stephen Bannon harbors fever dream of an American gulag in the Southwest desert and Trump enacts it. The Progressive: New documentsreveal the stark Islamophobia of Stephen Miller, the man behind Trumps Muslim ban. Electronic Intifada: Email from 2007 ties Miller to white nationalist Richard Spencer. Salon: Trumps war on Islam shows how anti-Muslim extremists hold sway in the White House. Think Progress: Sean Spicer asked about domestic terrorism, but cant stop talking about border security. BuzzFeed: Federal wildlife and land managers say they now fear for their safety due to antigovernment hatred. Mother Jones: Could anti-immigrant hardliner Julie Kirchner land a top Border Patrol spot? Associated Press: Jury convicts white nationalist who wounded Black Lives Matter protesters in Minneapolis. KPRC-TV (Houston, TX): High school students pose with Nazi salute, some shout Heil Trump and Heil Hitler. CNN: Milo Yiannopoulos is trying to convince colleges that hate speech is cool. Right Wing Watch: World Net Daily columnist Harvey says feminists worship a goddess who requires child sacrifice. Houston Chronicle: Whitesupremacist American Vanguard group hangs fliers around Rice University campus. Raw Story: Witnesses say L.A.woman yelled White power! before attacking elderly Korean pedestrian. The New York Times: Even as hate spreads online, KKK fliers show up on neighborhood lawns in Maine.

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Southern Poverty Law Center speaker to present Feb. 13 at CWU – Daily Record-News

Central Washington University will play host to Southern Poverty Law Center Outreach Director Lecia Brooks during a series of campus discussions on Feb. 13, according to a news release. Brooks spoke at a panel discussion at CWU via Skype in November. Story continues below video Building off a Not in Our Kittitas County event in November, Part 2 of “Building Respectful Communities: Transcending Hate,” is at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 13 in the Student Union and Recreation Center Ballroom. According to the release, Brooks will give historical context of the recent hate group activity in Kittitas County, as well as share SLPC data on hate incidents that have occurred since the presidential election. The Not in Our Kittitas County campaign followed Ku Klux Klan activity locally. Brooks’ presentation is sponsored by CWU and Not In Our KittCo. Two other events are planned on campus, one for faculty and staff and one for students.

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Hatewatch Headlines 2/7/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Slate: A white nationalist governmentis upon us, and it could set us back 150 years. Newsweek: The extremist Islamophobes at the heart of Donald Trumps White House. Truthout: Trumps proposed change to terrorism program would give green light to whitesupremacist violence. Forward: How Trump empowers white supremacists and jihadis alike. Los Angeles Times: In an age of alternate facts and Alex Jones, a massacre of schoolchildren becomes a hoax. Media Matters: How Stephen Bannon gets away with bringing white supremacy to Trumps Oval Office. Wired: Neo-Nazis face a new foe online and in real life the far-left antifa movement. ProPublica: Claims of homosexual agenda help kill hate-crimes laws in five states. Huffington Post: From Holocaust denial to Hitler admiration, Googles algorithm is proving dangerous. Teen Vogue: What you need to know about hate speech and free speech, and the distinctions that matter. KFGO-TV (Fargo, ND): White supremacist Craig Cobb eyes abandoned church in tiny town of Nome. Associated Press: Ex-convict who torched Orlando mosque after massacre gets 30-year prison sentence. MLive (Dearborn, MI): Masked open-carry advocate arrested after carrying rifle into police station. Political Research Associates: Pro-LGBT claims are being used as a smokescreen for anti-Muslim attacks. The Guardian (UK): How Richard Spencers hometown in Montana weathered a neo-Nazi troll storm. Washington Post: New Yorkers get out their hand sanitizers and erase subway swastikas. AOL.com: Richard Spencer deems Patriots Super Bowl victory a win for the white race.

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American antigovernment movement rooted in nation’s past – Southern Poverty Law Center

The special merit of the film is that it looks seriously at the antecedents of the worst domestic terrorist attack in American history the rise of revolutionary right-wing groups like The Order in the 1980s, the deadly standoffs in the early 1990s on Ruby Ridge, Idaho, and near Waco, Texas, and the gun control measures introduced by President Bill Clinton in 1994. These threads are described in fulsome detail. But the radical antigovernment movement that produced Timothy McVeigh and accomplices Terry Nichols and Michael Fortier goes back even further. It may be a worthy addition to Goodmans work to explore this long, historical arc. In the widest sense, antigovernment fervor in the United States begins with the birth of the nation in the throes of a revolution against a far-off and imperious monarch. Unlike European nations, which historically looked to government to solve the peoples problems, Americans would go on to develop a sense of going it alone and preferring that the government keep its nose out of their business. The examples start early. In 1786, just three years after the Revolutionary War ended, Shays Rebellion, driven by tax and other economic injustices, broke out in Massachusetts. Five years after that, in 1791, farmers in Western Pennsylvania, infuriated by a steep tax on whiskey, launched the Whiskey Rebellion. Both were nourished by the idea of a government estranged from the peoples interests. That sense was further strengthened by the realities of life on the frontier, where survival more often than not depended on the wits of individual pioneers and the use they could make of their guns. Government support and even charity were scarce to nonexistent, and self-reliance became a peculiarly American virtue. As the decades passed, the federal government also came increasingly to be seen as the overbearing enemy of the countrys extreme right. After the Civil War, after all, it was the government that militarily occupied the South, set up freedmens bureaus and gave former slaves their citizenship. In the 1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelts New Deal created the beginnings of a real government safety net, which also ushered in the age of modern taxation. During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the government once again was viewed by the radical right as an enemy that was helping minorities and curtailing the powers of the majority. The pattern continued into the contemporary era. The Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1970s and the Wise Use movement of the 1980s, both of them aimed at forcing the federal government to turn public lands over to local communities and allowing their commercial exploitation, gave a new boost to antigovernment feeling, with many believing the government cared more for spotted owls than humans. President Ronald Reagan, in his first, 1981 inaugural address, gave specific shape to this resentment, asserting that government is not the solution for our problem; government is the problem. Twenty years later, a similar quote, from anti-tax activist Grover Norquist, famously recapitulated that antigovernment view. I dont want to abolish government, Norquist said then. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into bathroom and drown it in the bathtub. The identification of the government as an enemy of the far right solidified with the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall and the subsequent dissolution of the Soviet Union. The American radical right, deprived of the bogeyman of communism, looked for a new enemy and found it in the government. This was, in a real way, the culmination of the antigovernment trend that began during the Revolution. By the time of the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, fully 39% of the American people agreed with the proposition that the federal government was so large and powerful that it poses an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary citizens. Since the bombing, that remarkable percentage has grown to shocking proportions 52% in 2001 and almost six in 10 Americans in 2010. Goodman is absolutely right to point to the events at Ruby Ridge and Waco, among others, as proximate causes for McVeighs horrific mass murder. And he is right, as the film points out clearly, to note that the bombers were a product of the white nationalist movement, just as much as the antigovernment movement. But while there are similarities between the Oklahoma City bombing and similar kinds of attacks in Europe, the 1995 outrage in Americas heartland was to a very large extent the product of a uniquely American history and culture. Mark Potok is a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center and the editor in chief of its investigative magazine, Intelligence Report. As a reporter at USA Today, he covered the Waco standoff, the birth of the militia movement, the Oklahoma City bombing and the trial of Timothy McVeigh. Potok was recently interviewed for the American Experience film Oklahoma City, which debuts PBS on Feb. 7.

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Hatewatch Headlines 2/6/2017 – Southern Poverty Law Center

Think Progress: White supremacists celebrate reports of dialed-down scrutiny: Trump is setting us free. St. Louis Post-Dispatch (MO): Words you will never hear from Donald Trump: Radical right-wing terrorism. CNN: Facts still matter when it comes to the nature of the terrorist threat facing Americans. The Guardian (UK): Jewish community centers in U.S. receive nearly 50 bomb threats so far in 2017. Chicago Tribune: Steve Bannon film outlinewarned that U.S. could turn into Islamic States of America. New York Times: Court documents reveal that Dylann Roof had a variety of mental disorders at the time of his trial. WMBF-TV (Myrtle Beach, SC): Craigslist ad talks about recruiting white men for war against minorities in defense of Trump. Oregonian: Four of seven remaining Malheur Refuge takeover defendants plead guilty to trespass. KDVR-TV (Denver, CO): Colorado mosque warned Department of Homeland Security about man who shot security officer. BuzzFeed: Amazon employees are trying to force the company to cut its ties to Breitbart News. Raw Story: Eatery customers leave note saying they liked the food, but Owner Mexican. We will not return. America First! New York Magazine: Violence and rioting in protest is exactly what Milo Yiannopoulos wants. Washington Post: Koran-burning preacher Terry Jones has been driving for Uber. Huffington Post: Teacher suspended after she rescinded college letter for student who made swastika, talked Hitler. Talking Points Memo: Confederate flag going back up at South Carolina monument.

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed

Daily Stormer Targets Federal Judges Ruling Against Trump’s Muslim Ban – Southern Poverty Law Center

Andrew Anglin, publisher of the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer, a prominent clearinghouse of racist Alt-Right editorials and memes, called for the military to arrest treasonous U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly in Manhattan for trying to flood America with terrorists and has called for martial law if other judges follow suit. We have a problem, Anglin wrote over the weekend. Trump needs to arrest this woman immediately and have her charged with treason. If other judges protest, he needs to declare martial law and have them all rounded up and interned. We are at war here. This isnt a game. Anglin stopped short of threatening Donnolly directly, but in an update, he called for Trump to deploy the National Guard to the protest sites at airports across the country and shut them down completely. Such posturing isnt new for Anglin, or for that matter, unexpected. Just last month, he planned but later abandoned an armed protest in Whitefish, Montana, after the mother of Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute came under community pressure for failing to condemn her sons views. Anglin published the personal information of members of Love Lives Here, a non-profit in Montanas Flathead Valley that addresses hate and extremism a retaliatory tactic used by online trolls, known as doxxing. Anglin didnt publish Donnellys personal information. But one reader, posting under the name forbesmag, provided the federal judges home phone number, her husbands name and a message: Traitorous idiot scum judge Ann Marie Donnelly, appointed by the fake nigger president from Kenya, on the recommendation of kike senator Chuck Schumer. As of Wednesday, Daily Stormer administrators had not removed the comment. Far-right extremists often use doxxing to intimidate their perceived enemies, including judges. Craig Cobb, the white supremacist who in 2013 attempted to establish an enclave of racists in North Dakota, took issue more than a decade ago with U.S. District Judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow after she ruled against the World Church of the Creator in a trademark infringement suit in 2000. Group leader Matthew Hale was arrested for soliciting Lefkows murder. He was convicted and sentenced to 40 years in prison, where he remains. In retaliation, Cobb, a follower of the Creativity Movement, published Lefkows home address and a map to its location on the Internet. He also posted pictures of Lefkows husband and children on Stormfront, until recently the worlds largest white supremacist website. Two years after that, in 2005, Lefkows husband and mother were murdered inside her Chicago house. The killer was not involved in white supremacy but was angry over Lefkows ruling in another case. Another white supremacist, Hal Turner, a one-time racist radio host who also served as an FBI informant, was charged in June 2009 with threatening to assault and murder three federal judges. He listed their work addresses and photos on his blog, writing, These Judges deserve to be killed. After two mistrials stemming from juror confusion about his FBI role, Turner was found guilty in August 2010 of threatening to assault and murder the judges. He was sentenced to 25 months and was released from prison in 2012.Trumps executive order indefinitely bars Syrian refugees from entering the United States and suspends the entry of all refugees for 120 days. It also blocks citizens and refugees of seven Muslim-majority countries Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States for 90 days. In reporting on international travel problems, The New York Time wrote, The global confusion that since erupted is the story of a White House that rushed to enact, with little regard for basic governing, a core campaign promise that Mr. Trump made to his most fervent supporters. Those supporters go far beyond the rank-and-file of the mainstream American conservative movement. They include extremists like Anglin, who gave Trump the moniker Our Glorious Leader during the campaign and, for a time, branded his website the most trusted Republican site on the web. Its no surprise why. Building a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico and barring refugees from war-torn, predominantly Muslim countries are ideas that energized the white nationalist movement during the campaign. Rebranding itself as the Alt-Right to escape the political baggage the ideology had acquired through the years, the movement heard in Trumps promise a solution to what it saw as a threat to America immigration. Now, in what the racist right calls Trumpmerica, fringe figures like Anglin have gained a new prominence, though remain far outside the mainstream. Anglin has warned, time and time again, that there is no room under Trump for dissent, not even if it comes from the judiciary. Trump swore to protect this nation from enemies foreign and domestic, and in this case, you have a domestic enemy protecting a foreign one, Anglin wrote. We have to shut it down. For great justice.

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center  Comments Closed


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