Archive for the ‘SPLC’ Category

SPLC adds Heyer’s image to Wall of Tolerance – The Charlottesville Newsplex

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The Southern Poverty Law Center says it has added Heather Heyer’s name to its Wall of Tolerance at the Civil Rights Memorial Center.

The SPLC said on its website Friday that it had added a tribute to Heyer to its center in Montgomery, Alabama.

The 32-year-old Heyer was killed when a car careened into a crowd of counter protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The tribute features a digital portrait of Heyer that stretches from the bottom of the 20-by-40 foot Wall of Tolerance up to the ceiling. The digital wall displays the names, cascading continuously from top to bottom, of more than 500,000 people who have pledged to take a stand against injustice.

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SPLC adds Heyer’s image to Wall of Tolerance – The Charlottesville Newsplex

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Weekend Read: It took Charlottesville for Silicon Valley to stand up to hate – Southern Poverty Law Center

Hate groups of all stripes used their websites to advertise their participation in the rally. They turned to social media to urge their followers to join them. And they used services like PayPal and Patreon to fund their invasion of Charlottesville, Virginia.

Suchpartnerships may soon be a thing of the past. By Monday morning, service providers had begun to pull the plug on hate groups and individual extremists alike.

I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the internet, Cloudflare Chief Executive Matthew Prince wrote in an email to employees announcing his suspension of the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer.

The Daily Stormer became the top hate site in America last year, but it struggled to stay online this week after its long-time host, GoDaddy, delisted its domain on Monday. Over the course of the week, The Daily Stormer transferred its registration to Google and even to the Russian Network Information Center, only to be kicked off each provider.

Charlottesville has definitely lit a fire under some people, SPLC Intelligence Project Director Heidi Beirich told USA Today. I wonder if the violence marks a sea change.

Beirich is right that tech companies have been stubbornly hands-off in the past. Despite policies that are ostensibly anti-hate, they have rarely taken action to remove hateful content or users from their platforms.

But as the nation grapples with the violent coordination of hate groups across the far-right spectrum in Charlottesville, Facebook has shut down at least nine pages connected to the rally; Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn have suspended several extremist accounts; Reddit has eliminated one discussion community that supported Unite the Right, and even OKCupid has kicked white nationalist Christopher Cantwell off the dating site.

By far, the biggest sweep came from PayPal, which agreed to block at least 34 organizations from using its services after an SPLC report highlighted how extremists used the platform to fund the rally in Charlottesville.

For the longest time, PayPal has essentially been the banking system for white nationalism, the SPLCs Keegan Hankes told The Washington Post. Its a shame it took Charlottesville for them to take it seriously.

It is good news that PayPal, Pateron, and other tech companies are finally taking steps to curb the hate on their platforms. But to truly make a dent in the hate and bigotry online, tech companies must be more cognizant of the role their services play in spreading hate.

If youre not outraged, youre not paying attention, Heather Heyer, 32, postedon Facebook before she was killed by an alleged Nazi sympathizer in Charlottesville.

It’s wise advice for tech firms in Silicon Valley and beyond.

The Editors.

PS Here are some other pieces we think are worthwhile:

SPLCs Weekend Readings are a weekly summary of the most important news reporting and commentary from around the country on civil rights, economic and racial inequality, and hate and extremism. Sign up to receive Weekend Readings every Saturday morning.

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Weekend Read: It took Charlottesville for Silicon Valley to stand up to hate – Southern Poverty Law Center

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SPLC honors Heather Heyer at Civil Rights Memorial Center – Southern Poverty Law Center

Like the civil rights martyrs whose names are inscribed on the Civil Rights Memorial, Heather took a stand against hate and bigotry and made the ultimate sacrifice, said Lecia Brooks, director of outreach for the SPLC, which built and maintains the memorial.

By speaking out for justice and equality, she embodied the spirit of the civil rights movement, and the life she led deserves to be recognized along with the names of other martyrs of the movement.

Heyer, 32, was killed Aug. 12 when a car plowed into a crowd of counterdemonstrators who were protesting a rally of neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and other white nationalists.

The tribute features a larger-than-life, black-and-white digital portrait of Heyer that stretches from the bottom of the 20-by-40 foot Wall of Tolerance up to the ceiling. The digital wall displays the names, cascading down continuously from top to bottom, of more than 500,000 people who have pledged to take a stand against injustice.

Also on the wall is a photo of Heyers mother and the following quote: They tried to kill my child to shut her up. Well, guess what? You just magnified her.

Heyer will later be honored with a memorial plaque in an area of the memorial center dedicated to contemporary civil rights martyrs. The area offers the stories of recent victims of hate as a reminder that intolerance and injustice persist in todays society.

The Civil Rights Memorial Center is the interpretive center that accompanies the Civil Rights Memorial, which honors 40 men, women and children killed during the movement between 1954 and 1968. Designed by Maya Lin and dedicated in 1989, its located outside the SPLCs main office in Montgomery, Alabama.

Heather was a young white woman who was deeply involved in taking a stand against injustice, when she didnt have to, Brooks said. Her story reminds me of Viola Liuzzo, who left her home in Detroit to help with the Selma-to-Montgomery March, only to be killed by white supremacists.

Liuzzo, whose name is inscribed in the black granite of the Civil Rights Memorial, traveled to Alabama in March 1965 to help with the march after seeing television reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. She was ferrying marchers between Selma and Montgomery when she was shot and killed by Klansmen in a passing car.

Heathers story demonstrates how much has changed since the civil rights movement and how much hasnt changed, Brooks said. Viola Liuzzo stood up against white supremacism in 1965. Heather did 52 years later.

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SPLC honors Heather Heyer at Civil Rights Memorial Center – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Statement by SPLC President Richard Cohen on Stephen Bannon’s ouster – Southern Poverty Law Center

But, frankly, we havent seen any signs of it yet. To show hes serious, he should fire any other white nationalist sympathizers in his administration. Then he should take concrete action to undo the harm he has caused, by enacting policies that unite rather than divide us.

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Statement by SPLC President Richard Cohen on Stephen Bannon’s ouster – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Apple Donates $1 Million to SPLC, Claims Trump Equated ‘Nazis and Those Who Oppose Them’ – CNSNews.com


CNSNews.com
Apple Donates $1 Million to SPLC, Claims Trump Equated 'Nazis and Those Who Oppose Them'
CNSNews.com
(CNSNews.com) — In a memo to employees of Apple, Inc., CEO Tim Cook announced that the tech giant would be donating $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and Anti-Defamation League (ADL), matching donations by employees …
Apple CEO announces $1 million donation to SPLCWIAT 42
Apple To Donate $1 Million To Southern Poverty Law Center In Charlottesville's WakeThe Daily Caller
In Misguided Response to Charlottesville, Apple Donates to Liberal Group That Endangers ConservativesDaily Signal
PJ Media –National Review –Complex –Recode
all 237 news articles »

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Apple Donates $1 Million to SPLC, Claims Trump Equated ‘Nazis and Those Who Oppose Them’ – CNSNews.com

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Media Use of SPLC a Blight on Credibility – townhallreview.com

Fake News is a dirty word in the media. The ultimate insult. The hope, in many media ranks, is it will someday be relegated to the word prison reserved for insults so awful, you cant say them out loud in any company. The kind that even Rolling Stone refuses to spell out.

That it will someday soon be referred to as the F-N word.

But alas, today is not that day. Fake News can still be spoken without an apology. You can write it in your Twitter rant without being fired or mocked or beaten up in your driveway.

Problem is, like a drug addict who returns again and again for one last binge, the big news outlets continue to embarrass themselves with what can be best described as fake news.

CNN, the network taking the brunt of this phrase, many times undeserved, earned it regardless once again this week with their list of hate groups, as provided by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Having the SPLC name hate groups is the equivalent of having Donald Trump decide what is real news.

In an attempt to appease their critics, but instead acknowledging a real issue, CNN added this caveat to their SPLC-driven story: Some critics of the SPLC say the groups activism biases how it categorizes certain groups. Really? Is that all? Some groups? As they say in Atlanta, the home of CNN, bless your heart. Thats southern speak for you are clueless, my dear. Or you are simply pretending to be. Neither is fitting for a news outfit struggling to dodge the fake news moniker.

The Southern Poverty Law Center made news recently as they have deemed the Alliance Defending Freedom a hate group. Why? They hold to a Biblical view of homosexuality. One held by Barrack Obama prior to the 2012 elections. One held by most Americans until recently.

Respected writer David French was a lawyer for Alliance Defending Freedom, and he still participates in their events. Nobody accuses him of hatred. Following a pair of stories at ABC and NBC touting the SPLCs take on ADF, French recently wrote in the National Review:

Lets be clear. The Southern Poverty Law Center, the civil rights watchdog group that ABC and NBC so prominently cite, has become a dangerous joke. Its a joke because the very idea that Christians are members of a hate group merely because they advocate for orthodox Christian principles and the liberty to live those principles is so intellectually and ideologically bankrupt that its barely worth addressing.

Long forgotten by CNN, ABC News and NBC News is that five years ago this week, Floyd Lee Corkin targeted the Family Research Council offices after finding them on a Southern Poverty Law Center hate map.

The clear irony here is that the SPLC is filled with hate. And they provide angry leftists with targets and maps to those targets. On that day, five years ago, a hero emerged and stopped what would surely have been multiple deaths. The SPLC insists they have no regrets. And the media did not hold them accountable. On the contrary, the media continue to come to the SPLC for their sacred list.

CNNs Chris Cillizza, a sarcastic but sharp Twitteraholic, retweeted the CNN story. A regular critic of fake news claims, he retweeted fake news from his colleagues.

And so for now, CNN has gifted its critics one more story to wave in the air, taunting the news giant, which seems completely unable to get out of their own way.

But they are not alone. As long as groups like the SPLC receives legitimacy from the media, the media deserve to be mocked. And mocked they will be.

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Media Use of SPLC a Blight on Credibility – townhallreview.com

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SPLC statement on Confederate monument lawsuit against Birmingham, Alabama – Southern Poverty Law Center

In the wake of deadly violence in Charlottesville, cities around the country are questioning why in a nation dedicated to equality for all, we continue to celebrate and memorialize the Confederacy. Some of these cities are even removing Confederate monuments from public spaces. But in Alabama, state officials are suing the city of Birmingham for trying to do what is right.

The Alabama Legislature should never have passed a law banning the removal of these symbols which represent the oppression of an entire race. Governor Kay Ivey should never have signed it. If the leaders of Birmingham a city forever linked to the civil rights movement believe such monuments do not represent their citys values, they should have the ability to remove them.

This law demonstrates that white supremacy and hate prevail in Alabama. It will continue to force people of color to live and work in communities where they remain in the shadow of the Confederacy.

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SPLC statement on Confederate monument lawsuit against Birmingham, Alabama – Southern Poverty Law Center

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The Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of hate groups – CNN

By Dakin Andone, CNN Design: Will Mullery, CNN

Updated 12:43 PM ET, Thu August 17, 2017

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

That’s the number of hate groups operating in the US, according to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center. The Alabama-based nonprofit activist group tracks civil rights and hate crimes and defines a hate group as an organization with “beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”

Some are classified as anti-LGBT groups, and some are black separatists, who don’t believe in interracial marriage and want a nation only for black people, according to the group.

Some critics of the SPLC say the group’s activism biases how it categorizes certain groups.

But since the FBI doesn’t keep track of domestic hate groups, the SPLC’s tally is the widely accepted one.

Editor’s Note: The headline on this story has been changed to more closely align with the content of the piece, which clearly indicates that the data on hate groups is from the Southern Poverty Law Center. This story has also been updated to provide direct links to the full list from the SPLC as opposed to publishing the entire list here.

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The Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of hate groups – CNN

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SPLC statement on generous donation from Apple – Southern Poverty Law Center

Tim Cook, Apple’s visionary leader, said it best: “Hate is a cancer, and left unchecked it destroys everything in its path.” In light of the horrific events in Charlottesville, my colleagues and I at the Southern Poverty Law Center are committed to redoubling our efforts to fight hate, teach tolerance, and seek justice for the victims of bigotry and unfairness. We can do no less.

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SPLC statement on generous donation from Apple – Southern Poverty Law Center

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SPLC adds Heyer’s image to Wall of Tolerance – The Charlottesville Newsplex

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The Southern Poverty Law Center says it has added Heather Heyer’s name to its Wall of Tolerance at the Civil Rights Memorial Center. The SPLC said on its website Friday that it had added a tribute to Heyer to its center in Montgomery, Alabama. The 32-year-old Heyer was killed when a car careened into a crowd of counter protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia. The tribute features a digital portrait of Heyer that stretches from the bottom of the 20-by-40 foot Wall of Tolerance up to the ceiling. The digital wall displays the names, cascading continuously from top to bottom, of more than 500,000 people who have pledged to take a stand against injustice.

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Weekend Read: It took Charlottesville for Silicon Valley to stand up to hate – Southern Poverty Law Center

Hate groups of all stripes used their websites to advertise their participation in the rally. They turned to social media to urge their followers to join them. And they used services like PayPal and Patreon to fund their invasion of Charlottesville, Virginia. Suchpartnerships may soon be a thing of the past. By Monday morning, service providers had begun to pull the plug on hate groups and individual extremists alike. I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the internet, Cloudflare Chief Executive Matthew Prince wrote in an email to employees announcing his suspension of the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer. The Daily Stormer became the top hate site in America last year, but it struggled to stay online this week after its long-time host, GoDaddy, delisted its domain on Monday. Over the course of the week, The Daily Stormer transferred its registration to Google and even to the Russian Network Information Center, only to be kicked off each provider. Charlottesville has definitely lit a fire under some people, SPLC Intelligence Project Director Heidi Beirich told USA Today. I wonder if the violence marks a sea change. Beirich is right that tech companies have been stubbornly hands-off in the past. Despite policies that are ostensibly anti-hate, they have rarely taken action to remove hateful content or users from their platforms. But as the nation grapples with the violent coordination of hate groups across the far-right spectrum in Charlottesville, Facebook has shut down at least nine pages connected to the rally; Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn have suspended several extremist accounts; Reddit has eliminated one discussion community that supported Unite the Right, and even OKCupid has kicked white nationalist Christopher Cantwell off the dating site. By far, the biggest sweep came from PayPal, which agreed to block at least 34 organizations from using its services after an SPLC report highlighted how extremists used the platform to fund the rally in Charlottesville. For the longest time, PayPal has essentially been the banking system for white nationalism, the SPLCs Keegan Hankes told The Washington Post. Its a shame it took Charlottesville for them to take it seriously. It is good news that PayPal, Pateron, and other tech companies are finally taking steps to curb the hate on their platforms. But to truly make a dent in the hate and bigotry online, tech companies must be more cognizant of the role their services play in spreading hate. If youre not outraged, youre not paying attention, Heather Heyer, 32, postedon Facebook before she was killed by an alleged Nazi sympathizer in Charlottesville. It’s wise advice for tech firms in Silicon Valley and beyond. The Editors. PS Here are some other pieces we think are worthwhile: SPLCs Weekend Readings are a weekly summary of the most important news reporting and commentary from around the country on civil rights, economic and racial inequality, and hate and extremism. Sign up to receive Weekend Readings every Saturday morning.

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SPLC honors Heather Heyer at Civil Rights Memorial Center – Southern Poverty Law Center

Like the civil rights martyrs whose names are inscribed on the Civil Rights Memorial, Heather took a stand against hate and bigotry and made the ultimate sacrifice, said Lecia Brooks, director of outreach for the SPLC, which built and maintains the memorial. By speaking out for justice and equality, she embodied the spirit of the civil rights movement, and the life she led deserves to be recognized along with the names of other martyrs of the movement. Heyer, 32, was killed Aug. 12 when a car plowed into a crowd of counterdemonstrators who were protesting a rally of neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and other white nationalists. The tribute features a larger-than-life, black-and-white digital portrait of Heyer that stretches from the bottom of the 20-by-40 foot Wall of Tolerance up to the ceiling. The digital wall displays the names, cascading down continuously from top to bottom, of more than 500,000 people who have pledged to take a stand against injustice. Also on the wall is a photo of Heyers mother and the following quote: They tried to kill my child to shut her up. Well, guess what? You just magnified her. Heyer will later be honored with a memorial plaque in an area of the memorial center dedicated to contemporary civil rights martyrs. The area offers the stories of recent victims of hate as a reminder that intolerance and injustice persist in todays society. The Civil Rights Memorial Center is the interpretive center that accompanies the Civil Rights Memorial, which honors 40 men, women and children killed during the movement between 1954 and 1968. Designed by Maya Lin and dedicated in 1989, its located outside the SPLCs main office in Montgomery, Alabama. Heather was a young white woman who was deeply involved in taking a stand against injustice, when she didnt have to, Brooks said. Her story reminds me of Viola Liuzzo, who left her home in Detroit to help with the Selma-to-Montgomery March, only to be killed by white supremacists. Liuzzo, whose name is inscribed in the black granite of the Civil Rights Memorial, traveled to Alabama in March 1965 to help with the march after seeing television reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. She was ferrying marchers between Selma and Montgomery when she was shot and killed by Klansmen in a passing car. Heathers story demonstrates how much has changed since the civil rights movement and how much hasnt changed, Brooks said. Viola Liuzzo stood up against white supremacism in 1965. Heather did 52 years later.

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Statement by SPLC President Richard Cohen on Stephen Bannon’s ouster – Southern Poverty Law Center

But, frankly, we havent seen any signs of it yet. To show hes serious, he should fire any other white nationalist sympathizers in his administration. Then he should take concrete action to undo the harm he has caused, by enacting policies that unite rather than divide us.

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Apple Donates $1 Million to SPLC, Claims Trump Equated ‘Nazis and Those Who Oppose Them’ – CNSNews.com

CNSNews.com Apple Donates $1 Million to SPLC , Claims Trump Equated 'Nazis and Those Who Oppose Them' CNSNews.com (CNSNews.com) — In a memo to employees of Apple, Inc., CEO Tim Cook announced that the tech giant would be donating $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center ( SPLC ) and Anti-Defamation League (ADL), matching donations by employees … Apple CEO announces $1 million donation to SPLC WIAT 42 Apple To Donate $1 Million To Southern Poverty Law Center In Charlottesville's Wake The Daily Caller In Misguided Response to Charlottesville, Apple Donates to Liberal Group That Endangers Conservatives Daily Signal PJ Media  – National Review  – Complex  – Recode all 237 news articles »

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Media Use of SPLC a Blight on Credibility – townhallreview.com

Fake News is a dirty word in the media. The ultimate insult. The hope, in many media ranks, is it will someday be relegated to the word prison reserved for insults so awful, you cant say them out loud in any company. The kind that even Rolling Stone refuses to spell out. That it will someday soon be referred to as the F-N word. But alas, today is not that day. Fake News can still be spoken without an apology. You can write it in your Twitter rant without being fired or mocked or beaten up in your driveway. Problem is, like a drug addict who returns again and again for one last binge, the big news outlets continue to embarrass themselves with what can be best described as fake news. CNN, the network taking the brunt of this phrase, many times undeserved, earned it regardless once again this week with their list of hate groups, as provided by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Having the SPLC name hate groups is the equivalent of having Donald Trump decide what is real news. In an attempt to appease their critics, but instead acknowledging a real issue, CNN added this caveat to their SPLC-driven story: Some critics of the SPLC say the groups activism biases how it categorizes certain groups. Really? Is that all? Some groups? As they say in Atlanta, the home of CNN, bless your heart. Thats southern speak for you are clueless, my dear. Or you are simply pretending to be. Neither is fitting for a news outfit struggling to dodge the fake news moniker. The Southern Poverty Law Center made news recently as they have deemed the Alliance Defending Freedom a hate group. Why? They hold to a Biblical view of homosexuality. One held by Barrack Obama prior to the 2012 elections. One held by most Americans until recently. Respected writer David French was a lawyer for Alliance Defending Freedom, and he still participates in their events. Nobody accuses him of hatred. Following a pair of stories at ABC and NBC touting the SPLCs take on ADF, French recently wrote in the National Review: Lets be clear. The Southern Poverty Law Center, the civil rights watchdog group that ABC and NBC so prominently cite, has become a dangerous joke. Its a joke because the very idea that Christians are members of a hate group merely because they advocate for orthodox Christian principles and the liberty to live those principles is so intellectually and ideologically bankrupt that its barely worth addressing. Long forgotten by CNN, ABC News and NBC News is that five years ago this week, Floyd Lee Corkin targeted the Family Research Council offices after finding them on a Southern Poverty Law Center hate map. The clear irony here is that the SPLC is filled with hate. And they provide angry leftists with targets and maps to those targets. On that day, five years ago, a hero emerged and stopped what would surely have been multiple deaths. The SPLC insists they have no regrets. And the media did not hold them accountable. On the contrary, the media continue to come to the SPLC for their sacred list. CNNs Chris Cillizza, a sarcastic but sharp Twitteraholic, retweeted the CNN story. A regular critic of fake news claims, he retweeted fake news from his colleagues. And so for now, CNN has gifted its critics one more story to wave in the air, taunting the news giant, which seems completely unable to get out of their own way. But they are not alone. As long as groups like the SPLC receives legitimacy from the media, the media deserve to be mocked. And mocked they will be.

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SPLC statement on Confederate monument lawsuit against Birmingham, Alabama – Southern Poverty Law Center

In the wake of deadly violence in Charlottesville, cities around the country are questioning why in a nation dedicated to equality for all, we continue to celebrate and memorialize the Confederacy. Some of these cities are even removing Confederate monuments from public spaces. But in Alabama, state officials are suing the city of Birmingham for trying to do what is right. The Alabama Legislature should never have passed a law banning the removal of these symbols which represent the oppression of an entire race. Governor Kay Ivey should never have signed it. If the leaders of Birmingham a city forever linked to the civil rights movement believe such monuments do not represent their citys values, they should have the ability to remove them. This law demonstrates that white supremacy and hate prevail in Alabama. It will continue to force people of color to live and work in communities where they remain in the shadow of the Confederacy.

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The Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of hate groups – CNN

By Dakin Andone, CNN Design: Will Mullery, CNN Updated 12:43 PM ET, Thu August 17, 2017 Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. That’s the number of hate groups operating in the US, according to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center. The Alabama-based nonprofit activist group tracks civil rights and hate crimes and defines a hate group as an organization with “beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.” Some are classified as anti-LGBT groups, and some are black separatists, who don’t believe in interracial marriage and want a nation only for black people, according to the group. Some critics of the SPLC say the group’s activism biases how it categorizes certain groups. But since the FBI doesn’t keep track of domestic hate groups, the SPLC’s tally is the widely accepted one. Editor’s Note: The headline on this story has been changed to more closely align with the content of the piece, which clearly indicates that the data on hate groups is from the Southern Poverty Law Center. This story has also been updated to provide direct links to the full list from the SPLC as opposed to publishing the entire list here.

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SPLC statement on generous donation from Apple – Southern Poverty Law Center

Tim Cook, Apple’s visionary leader, said it best: “Hate is a cancer, and left unchecked it destroys everything in its path.” In light of the horrific events in Charlottesville, my colleagues and I at the Southern Poverty Law Center are committed to redoubling our efforts to fight hate, teach tolerance, and seek justice for the victims of bigotry and unfairness. We can do no less.

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