Archive for the ‘SPLC’ Category

Stand up now, Mr. President – Southern Poverty Law Center

He cant bring himself to acknowledge that terrorism committed by white supremacists is, indeed, terrorism. The presidents tepid response yesterday to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, was telling. He denounced the hate and violence but spread the blame to many sides.

No, Mr. President, there are not many sides to what happened in Virginia.

Not when we see hundreds of white supremacists marching with torches at night in an American city.

Not when we see people killed and injured by a white supremacist using his car as a weapon.

Trumps initial, milquetoast response left racists feeling just fine. Amid its blog posts celebrating the days events, the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer wrote that Trumps comments were really good, adding that the president didnt attack us no condemnation at all.

Reacting to the national outrage, the White House issued another statement today not even attributed to Trump that said of course his condemnation includes white supremacists, K.K.K. neo-Nazi and all extremist groups.

But Trump himself was silent.

Im sure white supremacists remain reassured that they have a friend in the White House. A president who spews vitriol and heaps scorn on his enemies virtually every day and who has no trouble calling Mexicans killers and rapists still cant break off the unholy alliance with bigots that hes been cultivating since he first claimed President Obamas birth certificate was bogus.

And I suspect the alt-righters believe they can count on Trump to continue pursuing the same white nationalist political agenda thats been so plainly evident throughout the first six months of his administration. And why wouldnt they think so with alt-right champion Stephen Bannon whispering in Trumps ear?

No, Mr. Trump, there are not many sides to this. There is white supremacy, and there is America. There is good, and there is evil.

Its not a hard choice.

More:

Stand up now, Mr. President – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Analysis: Hate Groups Bank on Charlottesville Media Coverage as Recruitment Tool – Variety

The turnout of white nationalists that sparked violence in Charlottesville, Va., this weekend reflects an alarming level of cooperation among disparate hate groups to gain mainstream media attention. Thats the view of an expert at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Montgomery, Ala.-based civil rights org that has tracked the activities of white supremacist groups since the early 1980s.

Keegan Hankes, a research analyst for the SPLC, said the Charlottesville gatherings on Friday night and Saturday morning were heavily promoted in a months-long organizing campaign via social media by multiple white nationalist organizations in a bid to demonstrate a show of force in numbers. The effort not surprisingly brought out counter-protesters from leftist organizations, including those identifying with the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as clergy and others whotried to advocate for non-violent protest.

The timing of the rally dubbed Unite the Right was pegged to the citys decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park, which was the site of violent clashes Saturday between protesters, counter-protesters, and police. But the real agenda, according to Hankes, was to garner mainstream media coverage as a recruitment tool.

The violence that erupted between various factions of protesters will be selectively mined for images to portray white nationalists as under attack from violent leftists and the police, Hankes said.

The whole thing has been orchestrated around trying to get media attention, Hankes told Variety. They used the controversy around the Lee statue as a peg but what you really have is all these little hate groups competing in the same space trying to make a name for themselves. Theyll use media coverage and strategically controlled images (from the gathering) to bring in new members.

Among the most prominent groups represented at the rally were organizations that have revved up activities during the past two years as tensions over racial and ethnic differences and the urban-rural divide have heightened nationwide. The list includes numerous groups studied by the SPLC: Identity Evropa, Vanguard America, League of the South, the Daily Stormer, and the Right Stuff.

Many Americans were outraged by news footage depicting clusters of mostly white men chanting racist, anti-Semitic and anti-LGBTQ statements. Some attendees sported Nazi-related symbols and T-shirts emblazoned with quotes from Adolf Hitler. There were reports of rally-goers shouting Hitler was right among other hateful statements. Friday nights march through the University of Virginia campus offered chilling images of young men hoisting Tiki torches and making the Nazi-esque salute.

The top organizers of the event were likely dismayed by some of the more extreme statements and actions captured by news coverage, Hankes noted. The goal of the rally was to raise awareness of the movement among people who might be sympathetic to some their public policy goals such as curbing immigration but would be turned off by unabashedly racist rhetoric.

Rally organizers such as Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer are very concerned about the optics and message, Hankes said. But the level of anger on both sides could not be contained as protesters chanted such venomous statements as Jew will not replace us and anti-LGBTQ slurs such as F you, f-t.

The hate speech and taunts spurred a violent response from some counter-protesters, which contributed to the melee that ensued about two hours before the scheduled noon start time of Saturdays rally. The planned gathering with speakers, including Spencer, was ultimately scrapped when Charlottesville police declared the scene to be an unlawful assembly amid the chaos. But the organizers objectives were nonetheless achieved, in Hankes view.

Youll see the whole (white nationalist) machine swing into action when this is all over, he said. Youll see them very selectively pushing out images that show fake numbers and peaceful demonstrations by their groups. Theyll portray violent leftists and the Virginia State Police siding with the violent leftists to give a sympathetic edge to the people who are spewing the hate.

Read the rest here:

Analysis: Hate Groups Bank on Charlottesville Media Coverage as Recruitment Tool – Variety

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Flags and Other Symbols Used By Far-Right Groups in Charlottesville – Southern Poverty Law Center

What follows is a guide to some of the flags and symbols as spotted by Hatewatch analysts:

The above is a poster for the Charlottesville Unite the Right rally derived from Benjamin Franklins famous Join, or Die cartoon.

The groups depicted include from left to right (K) Kekistani, (AC) Anti-Communist, (L) Libertarian, (N) Nationalist, (I) Identitarian/Identity Evropa, (SN) Southern Nationalist, (NS) National Socialist, and (AR) Alt Right. The National Socialist flags depicted include Traditionalist Worker Party and Vanguard America.

The national flag of Kekistan mimics a German Nazi war flag, with the Kek logo replacing the swastika and the green replacing the infamous German red. A 4chan logo is emblazoned in the upper left hand corner. Alt-righters are particularly fond of the way the banner trolls liberals who recognize its origins.

Roman Legion Flag: Flag depicting an eagle holding a fasces standing inside of a laurel wreath. Each of these symbols have been adopted by various elements of the far right.

Vanguard America. Eagle carrying a fasces — symbol of authority in fascist Italy.

Vanguard America-Texas: incorporates the Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun) with star of Texas in middle.

Vanguard America. Eagle carrying a fasces — symbol of authority in fascist Italy. Top flag, Vanguard America-Texas: incorporates the Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun) with star of Texas in middle.

Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun), somes called the sonnerad: symbol has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi and/or neo-Volkisch ideologies.

Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun), somes called the sonnerad: symbol has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi and/or neo-Volkisch ideologies. The symbol is based on the ancient sun wheel artifacts that were made and used by Norse and Germanic tribes as symbol of their pagan beliefs. Those sun wheels, made centuries upon centuries ago, do not usually resemble the complexity of this particular version. The version above is inlayed into the marble floor of the Castle Wewelsburg, the castle that Himmler made the spiritual and literal home of the SS during the reign of the Third Reich, and has significance within the occult practices of the SS.

National Socialist Movementoldest and most likely largest NS group in USA. Run by Jeff Schoep.

Traditionalist Youth Network/Traditionalist Worker Party shirt.

Traditionalist Worker Party

The Traditionalist Worker Party is a white nationalist group that advocates for racially pure nations and communities and blames Jews for many of the worlds problems. Even as it claims to oppose racism, saying every race deserves its own lands and culture, the group is intimately allied with neo-Nazi and other hardline racist organizations that espouse unvarnished white supremacist views.

Southern Nationalist Flag:

Southern Nationalist Flag

Designed by a former member of the Neo-Confederate League of the South (LOS), the “Southern Nationalist”flag is intended to evoke the St. Andrews Cross and the Confederate Battle Flag (CBF). Frequently carried by members of LOS and their allies in the south.

A frequent variation features the flag combined with a CBF:

A variation of the neo-Confederate Southern Nationalist flag featuring a magnolia flower, the symbol of The Right Stuffs southern offshoot Identity Dixie.

A group whose name is an inversion of Anti-Racist Action (ARA), the first and historically largest (at one time) decentralized network of anti-racist and anti-fascist dedicated to confronting the far-right and disrupting their events and rallies through direct action, including violence.

The black and yellow colors refer to libertarianism, typically depicted on web forums under a black and yellow banner. Variations of the flag often feature helicopters dropping a figure from the sky, a reference to Augusto Pinochets brutal tactics of suppressing dissent.

Based on the model ofEuropean Identitariangroups, Nathan Benjamin Damigo launched Identity Evropafrom his grandparents compound in Oakdale, California. Identity Evropa focuses on recruiting college-aged, white students in order to discuss race realism and white interests, targeting disaffected young men by branding itself as afraternity and social club.

Generation Identitaire. European movement Identity Evropa based itself on.

American Guard is a group of hardcore nationalists (with aging/former racist skinheads and at least one klansman among its members) dedicated to physically opposing leftists at events and rallies. Augustus Invictus and Brien James are leaders within various state chapters. Some group members have connections to the Proud Boys and to the Fraternal Order of Alt-Knights, the Proud Boys military division.

Read more here:

Flags and Other Symbols Used By Far-Right Groups in Charlottesville – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC releases campus guide to countering ‘alt-right’ | Southern … – Southern Poverty Law Center

In recent months, numerous campuses have been rocked by student protests sparked by the scheduled appearances of alt-right figures such as Richard Spencer and Milo Yiannopoulos.

The alt-right activity is part of a larger surge in campus organizing and recruitment by white nationalists. Now, the movement is seeking to capitalize on the publicity and momentum it gained amid its strong support of the Trump campaign.

Some of the recent protests, at Berkeley and elsewhere, have attracted far-left activists known as anti-fascists and have turned violent, igniting a debate over freedom of speech on campus.

In its new publication The Alt-Right on Campus: What Students Need to Know the SPLC advises students to avoid direct confrontation with alt-right speakers and their supporters, many of whom are young white supremacists eager to engage in street fighting with students and anti-fascist protesters.

The guide is a project of the SPLC on Campus program, which currently has chapters at 30 colleges across the country.

The rise of the alt-right has left many students deeply concerned about hate on campus and asking what they can do to make a difference, said Lecia Brooks, SPLC director of outreach. This guide provides answers. It not only shows students how to respond to a possible alt-right event, but how to inoculate your campus against such extremism before these speakers appear on campus.

In addition to offering step-by-step instructions for students to counter the movements influence, the guide explains the racist ideology of the alt-right and profiles its leaders.

As the guide explains, public universities that have a policy allowing student groups to host outside speakers cannot legally bar alt-right speakers except under the most extreme circumstances. The SPLC urges students to hold alternative events that celebrate diversity, inclusion and cultural awareness. In addition, they should speak out against hate and encourage university administrators to issue statements condemning the views of alt-right speakers.

SPLC President Richard Cohen testified in June before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary about the obligation of universities to uphold not only the First Amendment rights of controversial speakers but to speak out against hate and bigotry.

We need to fight speech that threatens our nations democratic values with speech that upholds them, Cohen said in his oral testimony. Its an obligation that university officials have and one that everyone in public life, starting with the president, has as well.

Continue reading here:

SPLC releases campus guide to countering ‘alt-right’ | Southern … – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC urges court to uphold decision that struck down unconstitutional money bail system in Harris County, Texas – Southern Poverty Law Center

The case has the potential to reshape bail practices across the United States. Harris County is home to Houston, Americas fourth-largest city.

Harris Countys bail system is another example of a local government punishing poor people because they could not buy their way out of jail before their trial, said Micah West, staff attorney for the SPLC, which has successfully encouraged 75 Alabama cities to change their money bail practices. This process brazenly prioritizes money over liberty. It fails to take into account whether a defendant is a flight risk or a danger to public safety.

In May 2016, the Civil Rights Corp filed a federal lawsuit challenging pay or stay money bail practices in Harris County on equal protection grounds. The case was initially filed on behalf of Maranda ODonnell, a young mother who was detained in the Harris County Jail when she could not afford to post $2,500 bail after she was charged with driving with a suspended license. Other defendants in similar circumstances later joined the lawsuit.

On April 28, 2017, following an eight-day trial, U.S. District Judge Lee H. Rosenthal granted the plaintiffs amended motion for preliminary injunction, finding Harris Countys bail system unconstitutional and discriminatory against the poor.

She also certified the matter as a class-action lawsuit. Harris County has appealed the preliminary injunction to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Six states, as well as the American Bail Coalition, Professional Bondsmen of Texas, and Professional Bondsmen of Harris County have filed amicus briefs in support of Harris County and reversal of the district courts decision.

On June 7, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas denied Harris Countys application to stay a preliminary injunction issued by a federal judge that required the release of people who were awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges and could not pay bail. Hundreds of people charged with minor offenses have been released from jail following the order.

The SPLC filed its friend-of-the-court brief supporting the judges order in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals with several other organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the ACLU of Texas and the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

The case illustrates a national effort to end unconstitutional money bail practices. U.S. Sens. Kamala Harris and Rand Paul introduced a bill last month that would provide incentives for state and local governments to replace or reform their money bail systems.

Continue reading here:

SPLC urges court to uphold decision that struck down unconstitutional money bail system in Harris County, Texas – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC lawsuit: Racketeering scheme in Louisiana parish forced people jailed before trial to pay company for freedom – Southern Poverty Law Center

This is a disturbing example of our justice system being twisted beyond recognition by a scheme to make money, said Sam Brooke, SPLC deputy legal director. People who had already paid their bail were held ransom and extorted out of hundreds and thousands of dollars. They simply wanted their freedom while they awaited their day in court. That desire was exploited by Rehabilitation Home Incarceration.

In 2015 and 2016, more than 300 people were assigned to the company by 19th Judicial District Judge Trudy A. White. She often made these orders for indefinite periods of supervision without determining whether people were a flight risk or posed any danger. She did not assess their ability to pay the companys signup fee of $525 and its subsequent monthly fees and other charges.

One plaintiff, Kaiasha White (no relation to the judge), was forced to stay in jail for a month as she and her family struggled to pay both her bond and the companys signup fee. The jail would not release her until the company said its fee had been paid.

This practice needs to stop, White said. When you have to go to court, you shouldnt have to worry about being held for ransom because a business wants to profit off of you.

Henry Ayo, another plaintiff, was jailed for two months because he and his wife couldnt afford to pay his bond and the signup fee. After paying for his release, Ayo was informed by the company that he had to pay $225 a month while awaiting trial, or he could be arrested and jailed again.

Ayo and his wife paid the company approximately $1,000. The only supervision he received was being required to make phone calls that often went unanswered.

This is predatory and illegal. Rehabilitation Home Incarceration puts its own price on peoples liberty and forces them to pay up, over and over again, said Brandon Buskey, senior staff attorney with the ACLUs Criminal Law Reform Project. Worse, this could not happen without the court and the jail enabling this scam, and ignoring the rights of those charged and presumed innocent.

The lawsuit accuses Dunn, Rehabilitation Home Incarcerations executive director, of operating an illegal racketeering enterprise under Louisiana and federal law through his company. It also accuses the company and the East Baton Rouge Parish of violating peoples Fourth and 14th Amendment rights. It raises additional state law claims of unjust enrichment and conversion, as well as a violation of the Louisiana Unfair Trade Practices Act.

Judge White and others associated with Rehabilitation Home Incarceration are political allies. Cleve Dunn Sr. was paid for marketing services for the judges 2014 re-election campaign. His son, Cleve Dunn Jr., served as chairman of the judges re-election campaign committee.

The people of Baton Rouge should not be forced to support private companies in order to secure their release from jail, said Marjorie R. Esman, executive director of the ACLU of Louisiana. Those awaiting their day in court are entitled to be treated equally regardless of the size of their bank accounts. Instead, people have been jailed and extorted after their release simply because they couldnt pay a private business and its owners. That is not how our system of justice is supposed to work.

The lawsuit seeks to recover damages. It is part of the SPLCs economic justice efforts to ensure that people are not punished or exploited due to their economic status.

Follow this link:

SPLC lawsuit: Racketeering scheme in Louisiana parish forced people jailed before trial to pay company for freedom – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Southern Poverty Law Center Isn’t Serving Its Original Purpose … – Capital Research Center

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) was founded to combat many racist and bigoted organizations in the United States, including the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups. The SPLC played a critical role in winning key legal victories against these groups, and protecting the rights and well-being of minorities across America.

But since these victories and the near-extinction of widespread, organized hate groups in America, the SPLC has lost its way and become increasingly political. The modern SPLC takes in millions of dollars each year, which it uses to falsely label many conservative and mainstream organizations such as the Family Research Council, a pro-life organization as hate groups alongside actual hate groups, in order to advance an increasingly radical agenda of so-called social justice.

Capital Research Center president Scott Walter narrates CRCs latest short video, detailing the ways in which SPLC no longer serves its original purpose. See it here:

More:

Southern Poverty Law Center Isn’t Serving Its Original Purpose … – Capital Research Center

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

The Dangerous Implications of SPLC’s Influence in America – National Catholic Register (blog)

Blogs | Aug. 8, 2017

The Southern Poverty Law Center seems to define any disagreement on the truths of sexuality and gender as hate.

Readers ofthe Registerare undoubtedly familiar with the influential leftist group Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).According to the Media Research Center’s Dan Gainor, SPLC was once a legitimate civil rights organizationthat has become a leftist propaganda shop.

Today, they use their influence to malign organizations that don’t kowtow to new definitions on marriage, sexuality, and gender as hate groups.

Recently, ABC News and NBC used SPLC to label the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) as a hate group. ADF, which has won a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and represents clients whose religious liberty is at stake, has received support from conservatives, including a U.S. Senator whoremindedABC that disagreement is not the same as discrimination and its not the same as hate.

Some of the implications of SPLC’s influence which from 2007 to 2014 included being an official partner of the FBI are obvious. Many conservatives hold them accountable for at least a shooter who went after the Family Research Council in 2012, and another shooter who targeted GOP Members of Congress.In 2015, theywon a court casethat put a reparative therapy group out of business. Under President Obama, they pushed LGBT propaganda onto military service members.

However, there are two other implications that are often overlooked:

1. SPLC’s definition of a hate groupcould risk the legal status of mainstream religious groups like the Catholic Church. LifeSiteNewsEditor-in-Chief John-HenryWesten told me he thinks this is the goal. SPLCpoint is to criminalize the Catholic Church and similar Christian faiths that disagree with SPLCs ideological views, especially those on human sexuality, said Westen in an e-mail.

According to SPLC,a hate grouphas beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.Additionally,Hate group activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing.

These broad definitions clearly encompass the Church, which teaches the truth about sexuality and gender through many mediums, individuals, and groups.

2. To some liberals, blaming SPLC for certain violence against conservatives may be seen as hypocritical, since pro-life activists refuse to take blame when violence is committed against abortionists. Conversely, conservatives condemn how liberals blame peaceful and prayerful pro-lifers for violence against abortionists while turning a blind eye to any roleThe New York Timesmight play in ambushes of police officersor any role SPLC might have played in the aforementioned 2012 and 2017 shootings.

However, Gainor says it is consistent to hold SPLC’s feet to the proverbial fire, telling me that there is an enormous difference between conservative complaints about Planned Parenthood and what the SPLC pretends to do.

Conservatives are right in calling out Planned Parenthood, said Gainor in an e-mail. It pretends to be pro-woman and then uses taxpayer dollars to destroy … babies. The SPLC simply uses its extremist ideology to identify anyone who dares to simply disagree as a hater and, by so doing, may put them at risk of harm.

Gainors argument implies three good points first, pro-life complaints about Planned Parenthood are doubly valid because the abortion company is publicly funded. Second, pro-lifers views are based on the truth of human life, while SPLCs hate group designation is used to promote lies about human sexuality.

Perhaps most importantly, SPLC says disagreement on the truths of sexuality and gender is hate. Pro-lifers say murdering innocents is well, murder. And then we pray for everyone involved.

Read more here:

The Dangerous Implications of SPLC’s Influence in America – National Catholic Register (blog)

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC demands Department of Justice take action against immigration judges violating detainees’ constitutional rights – Southern Poverty Law Center

The complaint, which comes almost a year after the SPLC and Human Rights First notified the agency about the judges, describes how they fail to explain basic legal information to immigrants, or even demonstrate the necessary dignity and courtesy the rules of conduct require.

The complaint notes that after one man told a judge that he had grown up in the United States, the judge said that if he were truly an American, he should be speaking English, not Spanish. The findings come after the SPLC spent a month observing the hearings of 436 people.

The federal agency has claimed that it initiated discussions with the judges after the initial complaint was filed in late August 2016, but the SPLCs courtroom observers and its experience representing detainees continue to uncover issues at the court, which is inside the privately operated Stewart Detention Center in rural Lumpkin, Georgia.

The people appearing before this court are already being held at the Stewart Detention Center, often far from their family and friends, said Dan Werner, director of the SPLCs Southeast Immigrant Freedom Initiative, which represents immigrants detained at Stewart. They are scared and unsure of their rights when they go before judges whose behavior gives no assurance that theyll receive a fair hearing. In fact, their behavior makes a mockery of the legal system.

The SPLCs courtroom observers found a number of issues, including judges failing to provide interpretation services for the entire court proceeding. They also failed to provide rationales for their decisions, provide written notification about future proceedings to the detainees, or grant routine procedural motions.

The complaint describes how Judge Saundra Arrington stands out for her lack of professionalism and hostility toward immigrant detainees behavior warranting reprimand, suspension or even removal from the bench, according to the complaint.

Arrington, who goes by the last name Dempsey but is referred to as Arrington in EOIR records, began hearings with one immigrant by prejudicially noting he had a huge criminal history, comprised of nine convictions for driving without a license over 15 years. It was Arrington who told a detainee that he should speak English if he grew up in the United States and believed he was American.

She also refused to allow two attorneys appear on behalf of an immigrant, stating that there may be one lawyer per case despite attorneys explaining they had filed the necessary paperwork. Two attorneys, however, were allowed to appear on behalf of Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office of Chief Counsel.

Judge Dan Trimble, according to the complaint, denied bond for a detainee without looking at the bond motion. He also rarely refers detainees to the detention centers Legal Orientation Program, which provides information about court proceedings and offers assistance.

The Department of Justice must take action to stop this behavior that is undermining the legal system, said Laura Rivera, SPLC staff attorney. Every day that this behavior is allowed to continue is a day dozens of people have their rights denied.

The SPLC launched the Southeast Immigrant Freedom Initiative (SIFI) at the detention center earlier this year to provide free legal representation to immigrants who have been detained and are facing deportation proceedings.

A recent national study found that between 2007 and 2012, only 6 percent of detainees at the Stewart Detention Center were represented by counsel far below the national representation rate of 37 percent, according to the SPLC complaint. Immigrants with counsel are approximately 20 times more likely to succeed in their cases.

Beginning this month, SIFI will expand to other detention centers throughout the Southeast. When fully implemented, it will be the largest detention center-based deportation defense project in the country.

View post:

SPLC demands Department of Justice take action against immigration judges violating detainees’ constitutional rights – Southern Poverty Law Center

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Stand up now, Mr. President – Southern Poverty Law Center

He cant bring himself to acknowledge that terrorism committed by white supremacists is, indeed, terrorism. The presidents tepid response yesterday to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, was telling. He denounced the hate and violence but spread the blame to many sides. No, Mr. President, there are not many sides to what happened in Virginia. Not when we see hundreds of white supremacists marching with torches at night in an American city. Not when we see people killed and injured by a white supremacist using his car as a weapon. Trumps initial, milquetoast response left racists feeling just fine. Amid its blog posts celebrating the days events, the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer wrote that Trumps comments were really good, adding that the president didnt attack us no condemnation at all. Reacting to the national outrage, the White House issued another statement today not even attributed to Trump that said of course his condemnation includes white supremacists, K.K.K. neo-Nazi and all extremist groups. But Trump himself was silent. Im sure white supremacists remain reassured that they have a friend in the White House. A president who spews vitriol and heaps scorn on his enemies virtually every day and who has no trouble calling Mexicans killers and rapists still cant break off the unholy alliance with bigots that hes been cultivating since he first claimed President Obamas birth certificate was bogus. And I suspect the alt-righters believe they can count on Trump to continue pursuing the same white nationalist political agenda thats been so plainly evident throughout the first six months of his administration. And why wouldnt they think so with alt-right champion Stephen Bannon whispering in Trumps ear? No, Mr. Trump, there are not many sides to this. There is white supremacy, and there is America. There is good, and there is evil. Its not a hard choice.

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Analysis: Hate Groups Bank on Charlottesville Media Coverage as Recruitment Tool – Variety

The turnout of white nationalists that sparked violence in Charlottesville, Va., this weekend reflects an alarming level of cooperation among disparate hate groups to gain mainstream media attention. Thats the view of an expert at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Montgomery, Ala.-based civil rights org that has tracked the activities of white supremacist groups since the early 1980s. Keegan Hankes, a research analyst for the SPLC, said the Charlottesville gatherings on Friday night and Saturday morning were heavily promoted in a months-long organizing campaign via social media by multiple white nationalist organizations in a bid to demonstrate a show of force in numbers. The effort not surprisingly brought out counter-protesters from leftist organizations, including those identifying with the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as clergy and others whotried to advocate for non-violent protest. The timing of the rally dubbed Unite the Right was pegged to the citys decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park, which was the site of violent clashes Saturday between protesters, counter-protesters, and police. But the real agenda, according to Hankes, was to garner mainstream media coverage as a recruitment tool. The violence that erupted between various factions of protesters will be selectively mined for images to portray white nationalists as under attack from violent leftists and the police, Hankes said. The whole thing has been orchestrated around trying to get media attention, Hankes told Variety. They used the controversy around the Lee statue as a peg but what you really have is all these little hate groups competing in the same space trying to make a name for themselves. Theyll use media coverage and strategically controlled images (from the gathering) to bring in new members. Among the most prominent groups represented at the rally were organizations that have revved up activities during the past two years as tensions over racial and ethnic differences and the urban-rural divide have heightened nationwide. The list includes numerous groups studied by the SPLC: Identity Evropa, Vanguard America, League of the South, the Daily Stormer, and the Right Stuff. Many Americans were outraged by news footage depicting clusters of mostly white men chanting racist, anti-Semitic and anti-LGBTQ statements. Some attendees sported Nazi-related symbols and T-shirts emblazoned with quotes from Adolf Hitler. There were reports of rally-goers shouting Hitler was right among other hateful statements. Friday nights march through the University of Virginia campus offered chilling images of young men hoisting Tiki torches and making the Nazi-esque salute. The top organizers of the event were likely dismayed by some of the more extreme statements and actions captured by news coverage, Hankes noted. The goal of the rally was to raise awareness of the movement among people who might be sympathetic to some their public policy goals such as curbing immigration but would be turned off by unabashedly racist rhetoric. Rally organizers such as Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer are very concerned about the optics and message, Hankes said. But the level of anger on both sides could not be contained as protesters chanted such venomous statements as Jew will not replace us and anti-LGBTQ slurs such as F you, f-t. The hate speech and taunts spurred a violent response from some counter-protesters, which contributed to the melee that ensued about two hours before the scheduled noon start time of Saturdays rally. The planned gathering with speakers, including Spencer, was ultimately scrapped when Charlottesville police declared the scene to be an unlawful assembly amid the chaos. But the organizers objectives were nonetheless achieved, in Hankes view. Youll see the whole (white nationalist) machine swing into action when this is all over, he said. Youll see them very selectively pushing out images that show fake numbers and peaceful demonstrations by their groups. Theyll portray violent leftists and the Virginia State Police siding with the violent leftists to give a sympathetic edge to the people who are spewing the hate.

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Flags and Other Symbols Used By Far-Right Groups in Charlottesville – Southern Poverty Law Center

What follows is a guide to some of the flags and symbols as spotted by Hatewatch analysts: The above is a poster for the Charlottesville Unite the Right rally derived from Benjamin Franklins famous Join, or Die cartoon. The groups depicted include from left to right (K) Kekistani, (AC) Anti-Communist, (L) Libertarian, (N) Nationalist, (I) Identitarian/Identity Evropa, (SN) Southern Nationalist, (NS) National Socialist, and (AR) Alt Right. The National Socialist flags depicted include Traditionalist Worker Party and Vanguard America. The national flag of Kekistan mimics a German Nazi war flag, with the Kek logo replacing the swastika and the green replacing the infamous German red. A 4chan logo is emblazoned in the upper left hand corner. Alt-righters are particularly fond of the way the banner trolls liberals who recognize its origins. Roman Legion Flag: Flag depicting an eagle holding a fasces standing inside of a laurel wreath. Each of these symbols have been adopted by various elements of the far right. Vanguard America. Eagle carrying a fasces — symbol of authority in fascist Italy. Vanguard America-Texas: incorporates the Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun) with star of Texas in middle. Vanguard America. Eagle carrying a fasces — symbol of authority in fascist Italy. Top flag, Vanguard America-Texas: incorporates the Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun) with star of Texas in middle. Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun), somes called the sonnerad: symbol has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi and/or neo-Volkisch ideologies. Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun), somes called the sonnerad: symbol has become synonymous with myriad far-right groups who traffic in neo-Nazi and/or neo-Volkisch ideologies. The symbol is based on the ancient sun wheel artifacts that were made and used by Norse and Germanic tribes as symbol of their pagan beliefs. Those sun wheels, made centuries upon centuries ago, do not usually resemble the complexity of this particular version. The version above is inlayed into the marble floor of the Castle Wewelsburg, the castle that Himmler made the spiritual and literal home of the SS during the reign of the Third Reich, and has significance within the occult practices of the SS. National Socialist Movementoldest and most likely largest NS group in USA. Run by Jeff Schoep. Traditionalist Youth Network/Traditionalist Worker Party shirt. Traditionalist Worker Party The Traditionalist Worker Party is a white nationalist group that advocates for racially pure nations and communities and blames Jews for many of the worlds problems. Even as it claims to oppose racism, saying every race deserves its own lands and culture, the group is intimately allied with neo-Nazi and other hardline racist organizations that espouse unvarnished white supremacist views. Southern Nationalist Flag: Southern Nationalist Flag Designed by a former member of the Neo-Confederate League of the South (LOS), the “Southern Nationalist”flag is intended to evoke the St. Andrews Cross and the Confederate Battle Flag (CBF). Frequently carried by members of LOS and their allies in the south. A frequent variation features the flag combined with a CBF: A variation of the neo-Confederate Southern Nationalist flag featuring a magnolia flower, the symbol of The Right Stuffs southern offshoot Identity Dixie. A group whose name is an inversion of Anti-Racist Action (ARA), the first and historically largest (at one time) decentralized network of anti-racist and anti-fascist dedicated to confronting the far-right and disrupting their events and rallies through direct action, including violence. The black and yellow colors refer to libertarianism, typically depicted on web forums under a black and yellow banner. Variations of the flag often feature helicopters dropping a figure from the sky, a reference to Augusto Pinochets brutal tactics of suppressing dissent. Based on the model ofEuropean Identitariangroups, Nathan Benjamin Damigo launched Identity Evropafrom his grandparents compound in Oakdale, California. Identity Evropa focuses on recruiting college-aged, white students in order to discuss race realism and white interests, targeting disaffected young men by branding itself as afraternity and social club. Generation Identitaire. European movement Identity Evropa based itself on. American Guard is a group of hardcore nationalists (with aging/former racist skinheads and at least one klansman among its members) dedicated to physically opposing leftists at events and rallies. Augustus Invictus and Brien James are leaders within various state chapters. Some group members have connections to the Proud Boys and to the Fraternal Order of Alt-Knights, the Proud Boys military division.

Fair Usage Law

August 13, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC releases campus guide to countering ‘alt-right’ | Southern … – Southern Poverty Law Center

In recent months, numerous campuses have been rocked by student protests sparked by the scheduled appearances of alt-right figures such as Richard Spencer and Milo Yiannopoulos. The alt-right activity is part of a larger surge in campus organizing and recruitment by white nationalists. Now, the movement is seeking to capitalize on the publicity and momentum it gained amid its strong support of the Trump campaign. Some of the recent protests, at Berkeley and elsewhere, have attracted far-left activists known as anti-fascists and have turned violent, igniting a debate over freedom of speech on campus. In its new publication The Alt-Right on Campus: What Students Need to Know the SPLC advises students to avoid direct confrontation with alt-right speakers and their supporters, many of whom are young white supremacists eager to engage in street fighting with students and anti-fascist protesters. The guide is a project of the SPLC on Campus program, which currently has chapters at 30 colleges across the country. The rise of the alt-right has left many students deeply concerned about hate on campus and asking what they can do to make a difference, said Lecia Brooks, SPLC director of outreach. This guide provides answers. It not only shows students how to respond to a possible alt-right event, but how to inoculate your campus against such extremism before these speakers appear on campus. In addition to offering step-by-step instructions for students to counter the movements influence, the guide explains the racist ideology of the alt-right and profiles its leaders. As the guide explains, public universities that have a policy allowing student groups to host outside speakers cannot legally bar alt-right speakers except under the most extreme circumstances. The SPLC urges students to hold alternative events that celebrate diversity, inclusion and cultural awareness. In addition, they should speak out against hate and encourage university administrators to issue statements condemning the views of alt-right speakers. SPLC President Richard Cohen testified in June before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary about the obligation of universities to uphold not only the First Amendment rights of controversial speakers but to speak out against hate and bigotry. We need to fight speech that threatens our nations democratic values with speech that upholds them, Cohen said in his oral testimony. Its an obligation that university officials have and one that everyone in public life, starting with the president, has as well.

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC urges court to uphold decision that struck down unconstitutional money bail system in Harris County, Texas – Southern Poverty Law Center

The case has the potential to reshape bail practices across the United States. Harris County is home to Houston, Americas fourth-largest city. Harris Countys bail system is another example of a local government punishing poor people because they could not buy their way out of jail before their trial, said Micah West, staff attorney for the SPLC, which has successfully encouraged 75 Alabama cities to change their money bail practices. This process brazenly prioritizes money over liberty. It fails to take into account whether a defendant is a flight risk or a danger to public safety. In May 2016, the Civil Rights Corp filed a federal lawsuit challenging pay or stay money bail practices in Harris County on equal protection grounds. The case was initially filed on behalf of Maranda ODonnell, a young mother who was detained in the Harris County Jail when she could not afford to post $2,500 bail after she was charged with driving with a suspended license. Other defendants in similar circumstances later joined the lawsuit. On April 28, 2017, following an eight-day trial, U.S. District Judge Lee H. Rosenthal granted the plaintiffs amended motion for preliminary injunction, finding Harris Countys bail system unconstitutional and discriminatory against the poor. She also certified the matter as a class-action lawsuit. Harris County has appealed the preliminary injunction to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Six states, as well as the American Bail Coalition, Professional Bondsmen of Texas, and Professional Bondsmen of Harris County have filed amicus briefs in support of Harris County and reversal of the district courts decision. On June 7, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas denied Harris Countys application to stay a preliminary injunction issued by a federal judge that required the release of people who were awaiting trial on misdemeanor charges and could not pay bail. Hundreds of people charged with minor offenses have been released from jail following the order. The SPLC filed its friend-of-the-court brief supporting the judges order in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals with several other organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the ACLU of Texas and the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. The case illustrates a national effort to end unconstitutional money bail practices. U.S. Sens. Kamala Harris and Rand Paul introduced a bill last month that would provide incentives for state and local governments to replace or reform their money bail systems.

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC lawsuit: Racketeering scheme in Louisiana parish forced people jailed before trial to pay company for freedom – Southern Poverty Law Center

This is a disturbing example of our justice system being twisted beyond recognition by a scheme to make money, said Sam Brooke, SPLC deputy legal director. People who had already paid their bail were held ransom and extorted out of hundreds and thousands of dollars. They simply wanted their freedom while they awaited their day in court. That desire was exploited by Rehabilitation Home Incarceration. In 2015 and 2016, more than 300 people were assigned to the company by 19th Judicial District Judge Trudy A. White. She often made these orders for indefinite periods of supervision without determining whether people were a flight risk or posed any danger. She did not assess their ability to pay the companys signup fee of $525 and its subsequent monthly fees and other charges. One plaintiff, Kaiasha White (no relation to the judge), was forced to stay in jail for a month as she and her family struggled to pay both her bond and the companys signup fee. The jail would not release her until the company said its fee had been paid. This practice needs to stop, White said. When you have to go to court, you shouldnt have to worry about being held for ransom because a business wants to profit off of you. Henry Ayo, another plaintiff, was jailed for two months because he and his wife couldnt afford to pay his bond and the signup fee. After paying for his release, Ayo was informed by the company that he had to pay $225 a month while awaiting trial, or he could be arrested and jailed again. Ayo and his wife paid the company approximately $1,000. The only supervision he received was being required to make phone calls that often went unanswered. This is predatory and illegal. Rehabilitation Home Incarceration puts its own price on peoples liberty and forces them to pay up, over and over again, said Brandon Buskey, senior staff attorney with the ACLUs Criminal Law Reform Project. Worse, this could not happen without the court and the jail enabling this scam, and ignoring the rights of those charged and presumed innocent. The lawsuit accuses Dunn, Rehabilitation Home Incarcerations executive director, of operating an illegal racketeering enterprise under Louisiana and federal law through his company. It also accuses the company and the East Baton Rouge Parish of violating peoples Fourth and 14th Amendment rights. It raises additional state law claims of unjust enrichment and conversion, as well as a violation of the Louisiana Unfair Trade Practices Act. Judge White and others associated with Rehabilitation Home Incarceration are political allies. Cleve Dunn Sr. was paid for marketing services for the judges 2014 re-election campaign. His son, Cleve Dunn Jr., served as chairman of the judges re-election campaign committee. The people of Baton Rouge should not be forced to support private companies in order to secure their release from jail, said Marjorie R. Esman, executive director of the ACLU of Louisiana. Those awaiting their day in court are entitled to be treated equally regardless of the size of their bank accounts. Instead, people have been jailed and extorted after their release simply because they couldnt pay a private business and its owners. That is not how our system of justice is supposed to work. The lawsuit seeks to recover damages. It is part of the SPLCs economic justice efforts to ensure that people are not punished or exploited due to their economic status.

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Southern Poverty Law Center Isn’t Serving Its Original Purpose … – Capital Research Center

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) was founded to combat many racist and bigoted organizations in the United States, including the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups. The SPLC played a critical role in winning key legal victories against these groups, and protecting the rights and well-being of minorities across America. But since these victories and the near-extinction of widespread, organized hate groups in America, the SPLC has lost its way and become increasingly political. The modern SPLC takes in millions of dollars each year, which it uses to falsely label many conservative and mainstream organizations such as the Family Research Council, a pro-life organization as hate groups alongside actual hate groups, in order to advance an increasingly radical agenda of so-called social justice. Capital Research Center president Scott Walter narrates CRCs latest short video, detailing the ways in which SPLC no longer serves its original purpose. See it here:

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

The Dangerous Implications of SPLC’s Influence in America – National Catholic Register (blog)

Blogs | Aug. 8, 2017 The Southern Poverty Law Center seems to define any disagreement on the truths of sexuality and gender as hate. Readers ofthe Registerare undoubtedly familiar with the influential leftist group Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).According to the Media Research Center’s Dan Gainor, SPLC was once a legitimate civil rights organizationthat has become a leftist propaganda shop. Today, they use their influence to malign organizations that don’t kowtow to new definitions on marriage, sexuality, and gender as hate groups. Recently, ABC News and NBC used SPLC to label the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) as a hate group. ADF, which has won a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and represents clients whose religious liberty is at stake, has received support from conservatives, including a U.S. Senator whoremindedABC that disagreement is not the same as discrimination and its not the same as hate. Some of the implications of SPLC’s influence which from 2007 to 2014 included being an official partner of the FBI are obvious. Many conservatives hold them accountable for at least a shooter who went after the Family Research Council in 2012, and another shooter who targeted GOP Members of Congress.In 2015, theywon a court casethat put a reparative therapy group out of business. Under President Obama, they pushed LGBT propaganda onto military service members. However, there are two other implications that are often overlooked: 1. SPLC’s definition of a hate groupcould risk the legal status of mainstream religious groups like the Catholic Church. LifeSiteNewsEditor-in-Chief John-HenryWesten told me he thinks this is the goal. SPLCpoint is to criminalize the Catholic Church and similar Christian faiths that disagree with SPLCs ideological views, especially those on human sexuality, said Westen in an e-mail. According to SPLC,a hate grouphas beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.Additionally,Hate group activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing. These broad definitions clearly encompass the Church, which teaches the truth about sexuality and gender through many mediums, individuals, and groups. 2. To some liberals, blaming SPLC for certain violence against conservatives may be seen as hypocritical, since pro-life activists refuse to take blame when violence is committed against abortionists. Conversely, conservatives condemn how liberals blame peaceful and prayerful pro-lifers for violence against abortionists while turning a blind eye to any roleThe New York Timesmight play in ambushes of police officersor any role SPLC might have played in the aforementioned 2012 and 2017 shootings. However, Gainor says it is consistent to hold SPLC’s feet to the proverbial fire, telling me that there is an enormous difference between conservative complaints about Planned Parenthood and what the SPLC pretends to do. Conservatives are right in calling out Planned Parenthood, said Gainor in an e-mail. It pretends to be pro-woman and then uses taxpayer dollars to destroy … babies. The SPLC simply uses its extremist ideology to identify anyone who dares to simply disagree as a hater and, by so doing, may put them at risk of harm. Gainors argument implies three good points first, pro-life complaints about Planned Parenthood are doubly valid because the abortion company is publicly funded. Second, pro-lifers views are based on the truth of human life, while SPLCs hate group designation is used to promote lies about human sexuality. Perhaps most importantly, SPLC says disagreement on the truths of sexuality and gender is hate. Pro-lifers say murdering innocents is well, murder. And then we pray for everyone involved.

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC demands Department of Justice take action against immigration judges violating detainees’ constitutional rights – Southern Poverty Law Center

The complaint, which comes almost a year after the SPLC and Human Rights First notified the agency about the judges, describes how they fail to explain basic legal information to immigrants, or even demonstrate the necessary dignity and courtesy the rules of conduct require. The complaint notes that after one man told a judge that he had grown up in the United States, the judge said that if he were truly an American, he should be speaking English, not Spanish. The findings come after the SPLC spent a month observing the hearings of 436 people. The federal agency has claimed that it initiated discussions with the judges after the initial complaint was filed in late August 2016, but the SPLCs courtroom observers and its experience representing detainees continue to uncover issues at the court, which is inside the privately operated Stewart Detention Center in rural Lumpkin, Georgia. The people appearing before this court are already being held at the Stewart Detention Center, often far from their family and friends, said Dan Werner, director of the SPLCs Southeast Immigrant Freedom Initiative, which represents immigrants detained at Stewart. They are scared and unsure of their rights when they go before judges whose behavior gives no assurance that theyll receive a fair hearing. In fact, their behavior makes a mockery of the legal system. The SPLCs courtroom observers found a number of issues, including judges failing to provide interpretation services for the entire court proceeding. They also failed to provide rationales for their decisions, provide written notification about future proceedings to the detainees, or grant routine procedural motions. The complaint describes how Judge Saundra Arrington stands out for her lack of professionalism and hostility toward immigrant detainees behavior warranting reprimand, suspension or even removal from the bench, according to the complaint. Arrington, who goes by the last name Dempsey but is referred to as Arrington in EOIR records, began hearings with one immigrant by prejudicially noting he had a huge criminal history, comprised of nine convictions for driving without a license over 15 years. It was Arrington who told a detainee that he should speak English if he grew up in the United States and believed he was American. She also refused to allow two attorneys appear on behalf of an immigrant, stating that there may be one lawyer per case despite attorneys explaining they had filed the necessary paperwork. Two attorneys, however, were allowed to appear on behalf of Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office of Chief Counsel. Judge Dan Trimble, according to the complaint, denied bond for a detainee without looking at the bond motion. He also rarely refers detainees to the detention centers Legal Orientation Program, which provides information about court proceedings and offers assistance. The Department of Justice must take action to stop this behavior that is undermining the legal system, said Laura Rivera, SPLC staff attorney. Every day that this behavior is allowed to continue is a day dozens of people have their rights denied. The SPLC launched the Southeast Immigrant Freedom Initiative (SIFI) at the detention center earlier this year to provide free legal representation to immigrants who have been detained and are facing deportation proceedings. A recent national study found that between 2007 and 2012, only 6 percent of detainees at the Stewart Detention Center were represented by counsel far below the national representation rate of 37 percent, according to the SPLC complaint. Immigrants with counsel are approximately 20 times more likely to succeed in their cases. Beginning this month, SIFI will expand to other detention centers throughout the Southeast. When fully implemented, it will be the largest detention center-based deportation defense project in the country.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."