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SPLC Hides Behind Its Own Hate – The Patriot Post

Jordan Candler Feb. 16, 2017

If theres one defamatory term that gets thrown around more than any other today, its hate. Politics has devolved to the point in which simply disagreeing on anything is cause for getting thrown into the Doghouse of Hate. Thats not to say there arent factions whose sole purpose is to promulgate hurtful and harmful rhetoric and deeds. Thats what ISIL does. And the KKK. And numerous other groups. Some are obviously more hostile than others, but theres no limit to the extremes people will go to on both sides of the political and social divide. However, the hate label can also be used to script narratives, which the Southern Poverty Law Center does in its annual Year in Hate and Extremism publication.

This week, the center reported that 2016 saw a three-fold increase in what it calls anti-Muslim hate groups. By its metrics, the U.S. now contains 101 so-called Islamaphobic groups whose retaliatory crimes include wrecking a mosque in Victoria, Texas, just hours after the Trump administration announced an executive order suspending travel from some predominantly Muslim countries. Moreover, it adds, In the first 10 days after [Trumps] election, the SPLC documented 867 bias-related incidents, including more than 300 that targeted immigrants or Muslims. All told, SPLC currently identifies 917 hate groups whose ideologies vary anywhere from neo-Nazism to black separatist advocacy to general hate.

To its credit, The Washington Posts coverage describes SPLC as a liberal-leaning advocacy group. But the reasons for skepticism toward the group go far beyond that. For one, general hate can be construed to mean anything in this world of moral relativism. The thresholds that delineate meanings now can and most certainly will change in the future. And all conservatives have bona fide reasons to fear falling victim. Secondly, if were playing by the same rules, the SPLC itself could be described as a hate group. As Family Research Councils Tony Perkins wrote in a recent column, For years, the anti-Christian Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) bragged about its work with the FBI. Their partnership on issues like hate crimes helped fuel the Obama administrations fierce targeting of mainstream pro-family groups. That abruptly ended in 2014, when the agency distanced itself from the controversial organization.

He adds, Despite being linked in federal court to domestic terrorism, SPLC, the self-anointed authority on hate, had remained a go-to ally of the Obama administration. That all changed, emails reveal, when FRC took our concerns to Congress about the ties between SPLC and the gunman who walked into our lobby in 2012 and shot Leo Johnson. The concerns we expressed to our friends in Congress was not just about FRC and our safety, it was about the dozens of pro-family groups and Christian organizations that the SPLC has targeted because of their biblical view of human sexuality. Just how outside the mainstream are the claims of SPLC? This was the Obama FBI that distanced itself from SPLC.

There is no justification for those who intentionally target anyone merely because of ideological differences. And the SPLC is right to call them out. But theres also no justification for the SPLCs true motive, which is to purge America of conservatism and anything else it considers not inclusive. When your own rhetoric results in getting good people like Leo Johnson shot, theres a serious need for self-reflection. Because thats the very definition of hate.

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SPLC Hides Behind Its Own Hate – The Patriot Post

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How the Southern Poverty Law Center Faked an Islamophobia Crisis – FrontPage Magazine


FrontPage Magazine
How the Southern Poverty Law Center Faked an Islamophobia Crisis
FrontPage Magazine
Huge Growth in Anti-Muslim Hate Groups During 2016: SPLC Report, wails NBC News. Watchdog: Number of anti-Muslim hate groups tripled since 2015, FOX News bleats. ABC News vomits up this word salad. Trump cited in report finding increase in US …

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How the Southern Poverty Law Center Faked an Islamophobia Crisis – FrontPage Magazine

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Look who’s on SPLC’s ‘anti-government hate group’ list – WND.com – WND.com

Known for labeling mainstream conservatives such as Dr. Ben Carson as extremists, the Southern Poverty Law Center is out with its latest list, this time puttingWND, WND Books, Phyllis Schlaflys Eagle Forum and others who espouse constitutional principles and traditional views of family among its 623 extreme antigovernment groupsthat should apparently be monitored because of their danger to society.

Reason magazine, the libertarian publication, noting SPLC is counting extremists again, pointed out the list includes WND and WND Books and asked: What on earth could justify that?

On its list of ACTIVE PATRIOT GROUPS IN THE US IN 2016 are 165 militia groups, SPLC said.

The list is part of SPLCs 2017 The Year in Hate and Extremism, an annual study, Reason said, inevitably covered heavily in the press, in which the SPLC tries to count the number of hate groups and anti-government Patriot groups that were active in the U.S. in the prior year.

The Southern Poverty Law Center is exposed in the Whistleblower issue THE HATE RACKET: How one group fools government into equating Christians and conservatives with Klansmen and Nazis and rakes in millions doing it

SPLC issued a report in November that compiled 867 alleged incidents of harassment and intimidation in the 10 days that followed the presidential election.

But many turned out to be hoaxes and most of the incidents on SPLCs list, while deplorable if they actually happened, did not include physical violence, meaning the use of the term attack was misleading. Most of the incidents were uncorroborated assertions of verbal threats or racist comments that dont appear to rise to the level of a crime, including chalking the word Trump on a university sidewalk and middle school students chanting Build the wall!

Further, SPLCs definition of haters and extremists has been at variance with the mainstream. The organization, for example, labeled Carson, now President Trumps HUD secretary, an extremist. After a nationwide backlash last year, the organization apologized and removed the post.

But the SPLC website still has a negative file on Carson that insists he has said things that most people would conclude are extreme, such as his belief that marriage is between a man and a woman.

SPLC Senior Fellow Mark Potok

SPLC also inspired a domestic terrorist and would-be mass murderer to conduct an armed attack on the headquarters of the Family Research Council with the intent of killing every single employee and leaving a Chik-fil-A sandwich on their corpses.

When SPLC issued a widely cited survey-report charging Trumps election sparked hate crimes in schools against minorities, it censored its finding that at least 2,000 educators nationwide reported racist slurs and other derogatory language against white students.

Hatewatch

SPLC, headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama, made a name for itself decades ago by fighting the Ku Klux Klan. Today, it presents itself as the nations premier defender of civil liberties and protector of the innocent from violent extremism. But through its highly publicized Hatewatch lists and Hate Maps, it solicits millions of dollars in donations to demonize and defame mainstream conservatives, Christians and Jews by lumping them together with genuine haters such as neo-Nazi Skinheads and the Klan.

Dr. Ben Carson

Progressive civil-rights activist Stephen Bright once declined to attend an event honoring SPLCs director, Morris Dees, calling Dees a con man and fraud.

The positive contributions Dees has made to justice most undertaken based upon calculations as to their publicity and fundraising potential are far overshadowed by what Harpers described as his flagrantly misleading solicitations for money, Bright said.

He has raised millions upon millions of dollars with various schemes, never mentioning that he does not need the money because he has $175 million and two poverty palace buildings in Montgomery. He has taken advantage of naive, well-meaning people some of moderate or low incomes who believe his pitches and give to his $175-million operation. He has spent most of what they have sent him to raise still more millions, pay high salaries and promote himself. Because he spends so much on fundraising, his operation spends $30 million a year to accomplish less than what many other organizations accomplish on shoestring budgets.

One of the best-known illustrations of Brights point is the case SPLC won for a black woman whose son was killed by the Ku Klux Klan. While the organization raised $9 million sending out solicitation letters featuring a gruesome picture of the victim, the mother received a total of $51,875 in the settlement. Dees pays himself more than $280,000 a year.

The Southern Poverty Law Center is expose in the Whistleblower issue THE HATE RACKET: How one group fools government into equating Christians and conservatives with Klansmen and Nazis and rakes in millions doing it

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SPLC says number of anti-Muslim hate groups on the rise – Columbia Daily Tribune

WASHINGTON The number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the United States has nearly tripled since 2015, due in part to radical Islamic attacks and the incendiary rhetoric of last year’s presidential campaign, the Southern Poverty Law Center said Wednesday in a new report.

The number of anti-Muslim groups increased from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016, the SPLC said. The number of hate groups overall tracked by the watchdog group also increased to 917 last year from 892 the previous year, the report said.

“2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The report blamed the increase in part on “incendiary rhetoric” from the campaign of now-President Donald Trump, which included threats to ban Muslim immigrants and “mandate a registry of Muslims in America.”

It also cited as factors “the unrelenting propaganda of a growing circle of well-paid ideologues” and radical Islamist attacks such as the June 2016 massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla.The SPLC’s findings come as anti-Muslim posters were discovered this week at a mosque in Bossier City, La., and on the campuses of the University of Texas and Rutgers University.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations wants campus officials to assure the safety of Muslim students and to investigate the mosque posters as a hate crime.

“It is clear that these signs, which were used to vandalize a house of worship, are part of a nationwide campaign by racists and Islamophobes to intimidate the American Muslim community,” spokesman Ibrahim Hooper said.

The SPLC, a not-for-profit organization based in Montgomery, Ala., monitors the activities of hate groups and other extremists across the country. The SPLC defines hate groups as those that vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity.

“Patriot” or anti-government groups are on the downswing, according to the report. “The groups had skyrocketed from a low of 149 in 2008 to a high of 1,360 in 2012, in large part as a reaction to the November 2008 election of Barack Obama,” the report said.

But now the number of Patriot groups is falling, dropping from 998 in 2015 to 623 last year. Militias, which the report called the “armed wing of the Patriot movement,” also fell from 276 to 165 groups.

Black separatist groups grew from 180 in 2015 to 193 last year, as did neo-Confederate groups, which rose from 35 to 43 groups.

The number of Ku Klux Klan groups fell from 190 in 2015 to 130 in 2016. The report said contraction was expected among Klan groups, which had more than doubled from 72 in 2014.

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SPLC says number of anti-Muslim hate groups on the rise – Columbia Daily Tribune

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Domestic militia groups plummet 40 percent amid Trump rise – Kansas City Star

Domestic militia groups plummet 40 percent amid Trump rise
Kansas City Star
As President Donald Trump campaigned and rose to power, the number of Patriot groups operating in the U.S. fell by 38 percent, according to an analysis by the Southern Poverty Law Center. SPLC, which monitors hate groups around the country, released …

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Domestic militia groups plummet 40 percent amid Trump rise – Kansas City Star

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Huge Growth in Anti-Muslim Hate Groups During 2016: SPLC …

Members of the Ku Klux Klan burn crosses after a “white pride” rally in rural Paulding County near Cedartown, Georgia, on April 27, 2016. John Bazemore / AP

“Not every sector of the movement did well this year,” Beirich said. “Klan groups fell by a bit of a chunk, but most of the groups that we consider white nationalist that are Trump-aligned for the most part held steady.”

The SPLC

The annual census, which was released Wednesday, found that most of the groups created to bolster those messages in 2016 were specifically anti-Muslim.

The SPLC alleged Trump’s rhetoric during the campaign encouraged the creation of anti-Muslim organizations and legitimized them. He

Ibrahim Hooper, national communications director Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) said that Trump’s immigration ban which has been

Hooper noted the controversial affiliations of members of Trump’s inner circle in the White House.

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn is a board member of

Senior White House strategist Steve Bannon invited SPLC-identified anti-Muslim figures such as

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“There’s a tremendous level of apprehension and tension in the American Muslim community at a level not seen since 9/11,” Hooper added. “People are really wondering where we’re going as a nation and what their role and place will be in that nation.”

Trump has not directly addressed the spike in hate crimes.

When asked Wednesday about the spike in anti-Semitic incidents across the United States, Trump first cited his electoral victory and the support he had received during the election before addressing the issue.

“I will say that we are going to have peace in this country,” the president said. “We are going to stop crime in this country. We are going to do everything within our power to stop long-simmering racism and every other thing that’s going on.”

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2016 witnessed surge in anti-Muslim hate groups, SPLC report …

February 16, 2017 Hate groups particularly right-wing extremists and anti-Muslim groups are on the rise in the United States, according to a report released Wednesday by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The SPLC, a nonprofit advocacy group, defines hate groups as those that “vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity.”

The SPLC’s findings are contained in the current issue of their Intelligence Report, which tracks extremist groups. The “Year in Hate and Extremism” section charts the rise of various hate groups in the United States to “near-historic highs” over the course of 2016, a phenomenon they tied to “a growing circle of well-paid ideologues, and the incendiary rhetoric of Trump his threats to ban Muslim immigration, mandate a registry of Muslims in America, and more.”

The group found that the number of anti-Muslim hate groups has nearly tripled since 2015, from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016. Over the same period of time, the number of hate groups overall increased from 892 to917, about100 fewer organizations than the 1,018 groups identified in 2011, the all-time high recorded over the last 30 years of SPLC tallies.

“2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center and editor of the report, said in a statement.

The SPLC’s analysis ties the rise of hate groups to many members’ enthusiasm around the presidential campaign of now-President Trump, whom they viewed as “a champion of the idea that America is fundamentally a white mans country,” the report says. Comments criticizing Mexican immigrants,a proposal toban Muslims from entering the United States, and the appointment of Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News, an outlet associated with the so-called alt-right movement, encouraged radical right-wing groups that their concerns were being heard in Washington, the report argues.

“The country saw a resurgence of white nationalism [in 2016] that imperils the racial progress we’ve made, along with the rise of a president whose policies reflect the values of white nationalists,” Mr. Potok said.

In the 10 days immediately following the election, the SPLC documented 860 reports of hate-related incidents, as The Christian Science Monitorreported in December a surge that the organization’s president, Richard Cohen, called a “predictable result” of Mr. Trump’s campaign rhetoric.

At the same time, however, most Americans’ attitudes towards people of other religions havewarmed in recent years, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center. Nevertheless,feelings towards Muslims did rank near the bottom, compared to other major religious groups in the US. Pew found that a number of factors influenced warm feelings toward other religious groups, with one significant factor being whether or not a person actually knows a person from the other religion.

The SPLC report did find that anti-government groups in the so-called Patriot movement, often associated with right-wing militias, had undergone a large decline,dropping from998 in 2015 to 623 in 2016. Associated armed militias associated also fell, from276 to 165 groups. However, the SPLC notes that interest in these groups tends to die down somewhat under Republican presidents, and that Trump’s specific support for many of the Patriot movement’s key issues, such as support for gun rights, may have caused many groups to disband.

“The fact that such a prominent candidate was leading the charge on their concerns resulted in many abandoning activism,” reads the report.

SPLC also cites the 2016standoffbetween Ammon and Ryan Bundy and other armed protesters inOregons Malheur National Wildlife Refuge as another “key factor” in the decline of Patriot groups.

Black separatist and neo-Confederate groups both saw growth in 2016, though the number of Ku Klux Klan chapters fell from 190 to 130 over the past year. However, the report notes that Klan groups had experienced a surge in recent years, growing from 72 chapters in 2014 to 190 in 2015, and that some constriction in 2016 had been expected.

This article contains material from the Associated Press and Reuters.

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SPLC says number of anti-Muslim hate groups on the rise

WASHINGTON The number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the United States has nearly tripled since 2015, due in part to radical Islamic attacks and the incendiary rhetoric of last year’s presidential campaign, the Southern Poverty Law Center said Wednesday in a new report.

The number of anti-Muslim groups increased from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016, the SPLC said. The number of hate groups overall tracked by the watchdog group also increased to 917 last year from 892 the previous year, the report said.

“2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The report blamed the increase in part on “incendiary rhetoric” from the campaign of now-President Donald Trump, which included threats to ban Muslim immigrants and “mandate a registry of Muslims in America.” It also cited as factors “the unrelenting propaganda of a growing circle of well-paid ideologues” and radical Islamist attacks such as the June 2016 massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

The SPLC’s findings come as anti-Muslim posters were discovered this week at a mosque in Bossier City, Louisiana, and on the campuses of the University of Texas and Rutgers University.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations wants campus officials to assure the safety of Muslim students and to investigate the mosque posters as a hate crime. “It is clear that these signs, which were used to vandalize a house of worship, are part of a nationwide campaign by racists and Islamophobes to intimidate the American Muslim community,” spokesman Ibrahim Hooper said.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a non-profit organization based in Montgomery, Alabama, monitors the activities of hate groups and other extremists across the country. The SPLC defines hate groups as those that vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity.

“Patriot” or anti-government groups are on the downswing, according to the report. “The groups had skyrocketed from a low of 149 in 2008 to a high of 1,360 in 2012, in large part as a reaction to the November 2008 election of Barack Obama,” the report said.

But now the number of Patriot groups is falling, dropping from 998 in 2015 to 623 last year. Militias, which the report called the “armed wing of the Patriot movement,” also fell from 276 to 165 groups.

Black separatist groups grew from 180 in 2015 to 193 last year, as did neo-Confederate groups, which rose from 35 to 43 groups.

The number of Ku Klux Klan groups fell from 190 in 2015 to 130 in 2016. The report said contraction was expected among Klan groups, which had more than doubled from 72 in 2014.

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SPLC: Hate groups in Alabama on the rise, including KKK

(AL.com) The number of hate groups in Alabama has increased for the third straight year and is at its highest since 2012, according to a new report released Wednesday by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

The Year in Hate and Extremism 2016 report noted that hate groups from Alabama increased from 23 in 2013 to 27 last year, driven by the so-called hateful rhetoric of President Donald Trump during the presidential campaign, according to author of the report Mark Potok, a senior fellow at SPLC. Hate groups in the Yellowhammer state had dropped to 18 in 2014, the lowest number on record, according to data provided by SPLC, but a sharp rise in Ku Klux Klan and black separatist groups has seen the figure gradually increase.

The KKK currently has 11 active groups in the state, up from five in 2014, bucking a nationwide trend that has seen a significant decrease in the number of KKK affiliated groups. In addition, black separatist groups grew from one to five over the same period, according to the report.

While Alabama does not have any specific anti-Muslim groups, which saw a 197 percent nationwide increase in 2016, there is a new anti-immigration group in the state, known as the BorderKeepers of Alabama.

The report noted a small 3 percent increase of hate groups across the country, going from 892 in 2015 to 917 last year.

More on this story at AL.com.

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SPLC: Hate groups in Alabama on the rise, including KKK

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SPLC Hides Behind Its Own Hate – The Patriot Post

Jordan Candler Feb. 16, 2017 If theres one defamatory term that gets thrown around more than any other today, its hate. Politics has devolved to the point in which simply disagreeing on anything is cause for getting thrown into the Doghouse of Hate. Thats not to say there arent factions whose sole purpose is to promulgate hurtful and harmful rhetoric and deeds. Thats what ISIL does. And the KKK. And numerous other groups. Some are obviously more hostile than others, but theres no limit to the extremes people will go to on both sides of the political and social divide. However, the hate label can also be used to script narratives, which the Southern Poverty Law Center does in its annual Year in Hate and Extremism publication. This week, the center reported that 2016 saw a three-fold increase in what it calls anti-Muslim hate groups. By its metrics, the U.S. now contains 101 so-called Islamaphobic groups whose retaliatory crimes include wrecking a mosque in Victoria, Texas, just hours after the Trump administration announced an executive order suspending travel from some predominantly Muslim countries. Moreover, it adds, In the first 10 days after [Trumps] election, the SPLC documented 867 bias-related incidents, including more than 300 that targeted immigrants or Muslims. All told, SPLC currently identifies 917 hate groups whose ideologies vary anywhere from neo-Nazism to black separatist advocacy to general hate. To its credit, The Washington Posts coverage describes SPLC as a liberal-leaning advocacy group. But the reasons for skepticism toward the group go far beyond that. For one, general hate can be construed to mean anything in this world of moral relativism. The thresholds that delineate meanings now can and most certainly will change in the future. And all conservatives have bona fide reasons to fear falling victim. Secondly, if were playing by the same rules, the SPLC itself could be described as a hate group. As Family Research Councils Tony Perkins wrote in a recent column, For years, the anti-Christian Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) bragged about its work with the FBI. Their partnership on issues like hate crimes helped fuel the Obama administrations fierce targeting of mainstream pro-family groups. That abruptly ended in 2014, when the agency distanced itself from the controversial organization. He adds, Despite being linked in federal court to domestic terrorism, SPLC, the self-anointed authority on hate, had remained a go-to ally of the Obama administration. That all changed, emails reveal, when FRC took our concerns to Congress about the ties between SPLC and the gunman who walked into our lobby in 2012 and shot Leo Johnson. The concerns we expressed to our friends in Congress was not just about FRC and our safety, it was about the dozens of pro-family groups and Christian organizations that the SPLC has targeted because of their biblical view of human sexuality. Just how outside the mainstream are the claims of SPLC? This was the Obama FBI that distanced itself from SPLC. There is no justification for those who intentionally target anyone merely because of ideological differences. And the SPLC is right to call them out. But theres also no justification for the SPLCs true motive, which is to purge America of conservatism and anything else it considers not inclusive. When your own rhetoric results in getting good people like Leo Johnson shot, theres a serious need for self-reflection. Because thats the very definition of hate.

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How the Southern Poverty Law Center Faked an Islamophobia Crisis – FrontPage Magazine

FrontPage Magazine How the Southern Poverty Law Center Faked an Islamophobia Crisis FrontPage Magazine Huge Growth in Anti-Muslim Hate Groups During 2016: SPLC Report, wails NBC News. Watchdog: Number of anti-Muslim hate groups tripled since 2015, FOX News bleats. ABC News vomits up this word salad. Trump cited in report finding increase in US …

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Look who’s on SPLC’s ‘anti-government hate group’ list – WND.com – WND.com

Known for labeling mainstream conservatives such as Dr. Ben Carson as extremists, the Southern Poverty Law Center is out with its latest list, this time puttingWND, WND Books, Phyllis Schlaflys Eagle Forum and others who espouse constitutional principles and traditional views of family among its 623 extreme antigovernment groupsthat should apparently be monitored because of their danger to society. Reason magazine, the libertarian publication, noting SPLC is counting extremists again, pointed out the list includes WND and WND Books and asked: What on earth could justify that? On its list of ACTIVE PATRIOT GROUPS IN THE US IN 2016 are 165 militia groups, SPLC said. The list is part of SPLCs 2017 The Year in Hate and Extremism, an annual study, Reason said, inevitably covered heavily in the press, in which the SPLC tries to count the number of hate groups and anti-government Patriot groups that were active in the U.S. in the prior year. The Southern Poverty Law Center is exposed in the Whistleblower issue THE HATE RACKET: How one group fools government into equating Christians and conservatives with Klansmen and Nazis and rakes in millions doing it SPLC issued a report in November that compiled 867 alleged incidents of harassment and intimidation in the 10 days that followed the presidential election. But many turned out to be hoaxes and most of the incidents on SPLCs list, while deplorable if they actually happened, did not include physical violence, meaning the use of the term attack was misleading. Most of the incidents were uncorroborated assertions of verbal threats or racist comments that dont appear to rise to the level of a crime, including chalking the word Trump on a university sidewalk and middle school students chanting Build the wall! Further, SPLCs definition of haters and extremists has been at variance with the mainstream. The organization, for example, labeled Carson, now President Trumps HUD secretary, an extremist. After a nationwide backlash last year, the organization apologized and removed the post. But the SPLC website still has a negative file on Carson that insists he has said things that most people would conclude are extreme, such as his belief that marriage is between a man and a woman. SPLC Senior Fellow Mark Potok SPLC also inspired a domestic terrorist and would-be mass murderer to conduct an armed attack on the headquarters of the Family Research Council with the intent of killing every single employee and leaving a Chik-fil-A sandwich on their corpses. When SPLC issued a widely cited survey-report charging Trumps election sparked hate crimes in schools against minorities, it censored its finding that at least 2,000 educators nationwide reported racist slurs and other derogatory language against white students. Hatewatch SPLC, headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama, made a name for itself decades ago by fighting the Ku Klux Klan. Today, it presents itself as the nations premier defender of civil liberties and protector of the innocent from violent extremism. But through its highly publicized Hatewatch lists and Hate Maps, it solicits millions of dollars in donations to demonize and defame mainstream conservatives, Christians and Jews by lumping them together with genuine haters such as neo-Nazi Skinheads and the Klan. Dr. Ben Carson Progressive civil-rights activist Stephen Bright once declined to attend an event honoring SPLCs director, Morris Dees, calling Dees a con man and fraud. The positive contributions Dees has made to justice most undertaken based upon calculations as to their publicity and fundraising potential are far overshadowed by what Harpers described as his flagrantly misleading solicitations for money, Bright said. He has raised millions upon millions of dollars with various schemes, never mentioning that he does not need the money because he has $175 million and two poverty palace buildings in Montgomery. He has taken advantage of naive, well-meaning people some of moderate or low incomes who believe his pitches and give to his $175-million operation. He has spent most of what they have sent him to raise still more millions, pay high salaries and promote himself. Because he spends so much on fundraising, his operation spends $30 million a year to accomplish less than what many other organizations accomplish on shoestring budgets. One of the best-known illustrations of Brights point is the case SPLC won for a black woman whose son was killed by the Ku Klux Klan. While the organization raised $9 million sending out solicitation letters featuring a gruesome picture of the victim, the mother received a total of $51,875 in the settlement. Dees pays himself more than $280,000 a year. The Southern Poverty Law Center is expose in the Whistleblower issue THE HATE RACKET: How one group fools government into equating Christians and conservatives with Klansmen and Nazis and rakes in millions doing it

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SPLC says number of anti-Muslim hate groups on the rise – Columbia Daily Tribune

WASHINGTON The number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the United States has nearly tripled since 2015, due in part to radical Islamic attacks and the incendiary rhetoric of last year’s presidential campaign, the Southern Poverty Law Center said Wednesday in a new report. The number of anti-Muslim groups increased from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016, the SPLC said. The number of hate groups overall tracked by the watchdog group also increased to 917 last year from 892 the previous year, the report said. “2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The report blamed the increase in part on “incendiary rhetoric” from the campaign of now-President Donald Trump, which included threats to ban Muslim immigrants and “mandate a registry of Muslims in America.” It also cited as factors “the unrelenting propaganda of a growing circle of well-paid ideologues” and radical Islamist attacks such as the June 2016 massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla.The SPLC’s findings come as anti-Muslim posters were discovered this week at a mosque in Bossier City, La., and on the campuses of the University of Texas and Rutgers University. The Council on American-Islamic Relations wants campus officials to assure the safety of Muslim students and to investigate the mosque posters as a hate crime. “It is clear that these signs, which were used to vandalize a house of worship, are part of a nationwide campaign by racists and Islamophobes to intimidate the American Muslim community,” spokesman Ibrahim Hooper said. The SPLC, a not-for-profit organization based in Montgomery, Ala., monitors the activities of hate groups and other extremists across the country. The SPLC defines hate groups as those that vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity. “Patriot” or anti-government groups are on the downswing, according to the report. “The groups had skyrocketed from a low of 149 in 2008 to a high of 1,360 in 2012, in large part as a reaction to the November 2008 election of Barack Obama,” the report said. But now the number of Patriot groups is falling, dropping from 998 in 2015 to 623 last year. Militias, which the report called the “armed wing of the Patriot movement,” also fell from 276 to 165 groups. Black separatist groups grew from 180 in 2015 to 193 last year, as did neo-Confederate groups, which rose from 35 to 43 groups. The number of Ku Klux Klan groups fell from 190 in 2015 to 130 in 2016. The report said contraction was expected among Klan groups, which had more than doubled from 72 in 2014.

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Domestic militia groups plummet 40 percent amid Trump rise – Kansas City Star

Domestic militia groups plummet 40 percent amid Trump rise Kansas City Star As President Donald Trump campaigned and rose to power, the number of Patriot groups operating in the U.S. fell by 38 percent, according to an analysis by the Southern Poverty Law Center . SPLC , which monitors hate groups around the country, released …

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February 18, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

Huge Growth in Anti-Muslim Hate Groups During 2016: SPLC …

Members of the Ku Klux Klan burn crosses after a “white pride” rally in rural Paulding County near Cedartown, Georgia, on April 27, 2016. John Bazemore / AP “Not every sector of the movement did well this year,” Beirich said. “Klan groups fell by a bit of a chunk, but most of the groups that we consider white nationalist that are Trump-aligned for the most part held steady.” The SPLC The annual census, which was released Wednesday, found that most of the groups created to bolster those messages in 2016 were specifically anti-Muslim. The SPLC alleged Trump’s rhetoric during the campaign encouraged the creation of anti-Muslim organizations and legitimized them. He Ibrahim Hooper, national communications director Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) said that Trump’s immigration ban which has been Hooper noted the controversial affiliations of members of Trump’s inner circle in the White House. Former national security adviser Michael Flynn is a board member of Senior White House strategist Steve Bannon invited SPLC-identified anti-Muslim figures such as Related: “There’s a tremendous level of apprehension and tension in the American Muslim community at a level not seen since 9/11,” Hooper added. “People are really wondering where we’re going as a nation and what their role and place will be in that nation.” Trump has not directly addressed the spike in hate crimes. When asked Wednesday about the spike in anti-Semitic incidents across the United States, Trump first cited his electoral victory and the support he had received during the election before addressing the issue. “I will say that we are going to have peace in this country,” the president said. “We are going to stop crime in this country. We are going to do everything within our power to stop long-simmering racism and every other thing that’s going on.”

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February 17, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

2016 witnessed surge in anti-Muslim hate groups, SPLC report …

February 16, 2017 Hate groups particularly right-wing extremists and anti-Muslim groups are on the rise in the United States, according to a report released Wednesday by the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC, a nonprofit advocacy group, defines hate groups as those that “vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity.” The SPLC’s findings are contained in the current issue of their Intelligence Report, which tracks extremist groups. The “Year in Hate and Extremism” section charts the rise of various hate groups in the United States to “near-historic highs” over the course of 2016, a phenomenon they tied to “a growing circle of well-paid ideologues, and the incendiary rhetoric of Trump his threats to ban Muslim immigration, mandate a registry of Muslims in America, and more.” The group found that the number of anti-Muslim hate groups has nearly tripled since 2015, from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016. Over the same period of time, the number of hate groups overall increased from 892 to917, about100 fewer organizations than the 1,018 groups identified in 2011, the all-time high recorded over the last 30 years of SPLC tallies. “2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center and editor of the report, said in a statement. The SPLC’s analysis ties the rise of hate groups to many members’ enthusiasm around the presidential campaign of now-President Trump, whom they viewed as “a champion of the idea that America is fundamentally a white mans country,” the report says. Comments criticizing Mexican immigrants,a proposal toban Muslims from entering the United States, and the appointment of Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News, an outlet associated with the so-called alt-right movement, encouraged radical right-wing groups that their concerns were being heard in Washington, the report argues. “The country saw a resurgence of white nationalism [in 2016] that imperils the racial progress we’ve made, along with the rise of a president whose policies reflect the values of white nationalists,” Mr. Potok said. In the 10 days immediately following the election, the SPLC documented 860 reports of hate-related incidents, as The Christian Science Monitorreported in December a surge that the organization’s president, Richard Cohen, called a “predictable result” of Mr. Trump’s campaign rhetoric. At the same time, however, most Americans’ attitudes towards people of other religions havewarmed in recent years, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center. Nevertheless,feelings towards Muslims did rank near the bottom, compared to other major religious groups in the US. Pew found that a number of factors influenced warm feelings toward other religious groups, with one significant factor being whether or not a person actually knows a person from the other religion. The SPLC report did find that anti-government groups in the so-called Patriot movement, often associated with right-wing militias, had undergone a large decline,dropping from998 in 2015 to 623 in 2016. Associated armed militias associated also fell, from276 to 165 groups. However, the SPLC notes that interest in these groups tends to die down somewhat under Republican presidents, and that Trump’s specific support for many of the Patriot movement’s key issues, such as support for gun rights, may have caused many groups to disband. “The fact that such a prominent candidate was leading the charge on their concerns resulted in many abandoning activism,” reads the report. SPLC also cites the 2016standoffbetween Ammon and Ryan Bundy and other armed protesters inOregons Malheur National Wildlife Refuge as another “key factor” in the decline of Patriot groups. Black separatist and neo-Confederate groups both saw growth in 2016, though the number of Ku Klux Klan chapters fell from 190 to 130 over the past year. However, the report notes that Klan groups had experienced a surge in recent years, growing from 72 chapters in 2014 to 190 in 2015, and that some constriction in 2016 had been expected. This article contains material from the Associated Press and Reuters.

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February 17, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC says number of anti-Muslim hate groups on the rise

WASHINGTON The number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the United States has nearly tripled since 2015, due in part to radical Islamic attacks and the incendiary rhetoric of last year’s presidential campaign, the Southern Poverty Law Center said Wednesday in a new report. The number of anti-Muslim groups increased from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016, the SPLC said. The number of hate groups overall tracked by the watchdog group also increased to 917 last year from 892 the previous year, the report said. “2016 was an unprecedented year for hate,” said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The report blamed the increase in part on “incendiary rhetoric” from the campaign of now-President Donald Trump, which included threats to ban Muslim immigrants and “mandate a registry of Muslims in America.” It also cited as factors “the unrelenting propaganda of a growing circle of well-paid ideologues” and radical Islamist attacks such as the June 2016 massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The SPLC’s findings come as anti-Muslim posters were discovered this week at a mosque in Bossier City, Louisiana, and on the campuses of the University of Texas and Rutgers University. The Council on American-Islamic Relations wants campus officials to assure the safety of Muslim students and to investigate the mosque posters as a hate crime. “It is clear that these signs, which were used to vandalize a house of worship, are part of a nationwide campaign by racists and Islamophobes to intimidate the American Muslim community,” spokesman Ibrahim Hooper said. The Southern Poverty Law Center, a non-profit organization based in Montgomery, Alabama, monitors the activities of hate groups and other extremists across the country. The SPLC defines hate groups as those that vilify entire groups of people based on immutable characteristics such as race or ethnicity. “Patriot” or anti-government groups are on the downswing, according to the report. “The groups had skyrocketed from a low of 149 in 2008 to a high of 1,360 in 2012, in large part as a reaction to the November 2008 election of Barack Obama,” the report said. But now the number of Patriot groups is falling, dropping from 998 in 2015 to 623 last year. Militias, which the report called the “armed wing of the Patriot movement,” also fell from 276 to 165 groups. Black separatist groups grew from 180 in 2015 to 193 last year, as did neo-Confederate groups, which rose from 35 to 43 groups. The number of Ku Klux Klan groups fell from 190 in 2015 to 130 in 2016. The report said contraction was expected among Klan groups, which had more than doubled from 72 in 2014.

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February 17, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed

SPLC: Hate groups in Alabama on the rise, including KKK

(AL.com) The number of hate groups in Alabama has increased for the third straight year and is at its highest since 2012, according to a new report released Wednesday by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). The Year in Hate and Extremism 2016 report noted that hate groups from Alabama increased from 23 in 2013 to 27 last year, driven by the so-called hateful rhetoric of President Donald Trump during the presidential campaign, according to author of the report Mark Potok, a senior fellow at SPLC. Hate groups in the Yellowhammer state had dropped to 18 in 2014, the lowest number on record, according to data provided by SPLC, but a sharp rise in Ku Klux Klan and black separatist groups has seen the figure gradually increase. The KKK currently has 11 active groups in the state, up from five in 2014, bucking a nationwide trend that has seen a significant decrease in the number of KKK affiliated groups. In addition, black separatist groups grew from one to five over the same period, according to the report. While Alabama does not have any specific anti-Muslim groups, which saw a 197 percent nationwide increase in 2016, there is a new anti-immigration group in the state, known as the BorderKeepers of Alabama. The report noted a small 3 percent increase of hate groups across the country, going from 892 in 2015 to 917 last year. More on this story at AL.com.

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February 17, 2017   Posted in: SPLC  Comments Closed


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