Archive for the ‘World War II’ Category

World war ii | Define World war ii at Dictionary.com

A war fought from 1939 to 1945 between the Axis powers Germany, Italy, and Japan and the Allies, including France and Britain, and later the Soviet Union and the United States. The war began when the Germans, governed by the Nazi party, invaded Poland in September 1939 (see invasion of Poland). Germany then conquered France, using blitzkrieg tactics, and forced a desperate British withdrawal at Dunkirk. The Germans tried to wear down the British by heavy bombing, but the British withstood the attacks (see Battle of Britain). The Soviet Union signed a treaty with Adolf Hitler but entered the war on the side of the Allies after Germany invaded Russia in 1941. The United States was drawn into the war in 1941, when the Japanese suddenly attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. Japan made extensive conquests in east Asia but was checked by American victories at the Battle of Midway Island and elsewhere. The German invasion of Russia was halted at the Battle of Stalingrad. Allied forces took much of Italy in 1943, forcing its surrender. Beginning with the invasion of Normandy in 1944 (see D-Day), the Allies liberated France from German occupation and pressed on in Europe, defeating the Germans in the Battle of the Bulge and elsewhere. Germany surrendered in May 1945 (see V-E Day). The war in the Pacific ended in September 1945 (see V-J Day), after the United States dropped atomic bombs (see also atomic bomb) on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima (see also Hiroshima) and Nagasaki. In the aftermath of World War II, more constructive and less punitive measures were applied to the defeated countries than after World War I (see Marshall Plan, Nuremberg trials, and United Nations).

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June 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. A Navajo Code Talker who used his native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died.

The Navajo Nation says Roy Hawthorne Sr. died Saturday. He was 92.

Hawthorne enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at 17 and became part of a famed group of Navajos who transmitted hundreds of messages in their language without error.

The code was never broken.

Hawthorne was one of the most visible survivors of the group. He appeared at public events and served as vice president of a group representing the men.

He never considered himself a hero.

Hawthorne later served with the U.S. Army.

He’s survived by five children and more than a dozen grandchildren.

A funeral service is scheduled Friday.

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World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

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April 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

The American musical theater would never be the same, and neither would Rodgers and Hammerstein, who would go on to resounding successes with Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music. At the peak of their powers, in 1957, 14 years to the day after the opening of Oklahoma! Rodgers and Hammerstein produced a live television version of Cinderella for CBS starring Julie Andrews. It was the most-watched television event in history to that point, seen by 107 million viewers at a time when the population of the United States was 170 million.

But it was Oklahoma! that started it all. Beginning on the morning of April 1, 1943, tickets became all but unobtainable for the next four years. When Hammersteins tenant farmer in Pennsylvania asked for a pair for his sons wedding, the lyricist responded, Whens the wedding? The farmers answer: The day you can get the tickets.

The show was a huge cultural phenomenon that resonated with home-front America in the midst of World War II. The story may have been set in turn-of-the century Indian Territory on the verge of statehood, but its subtext was the determination it had taken to tame the frontier and by implication the courage it would take to defeat fascism in Germany and Japan. When the characters sang the joyous title song, with its proud anticipation of a brand-new state! audiences heard the promise of a brand-new world, one in which the citizens of the newly created United Nations might actually behave and act like brothers, in the words of The Farmer and the Cowman.

There had been no such promise in Green Grow the Lilacs, the Theatre Guild play on which Oklahoma! was based, and which had a Broadway run of just 64 performances, in 1931. Its author, Lynn Riggs, a 29-year-old gay cowboy turned poet and playwright, had written an atmospheric tale in which Stephen Sondheim, for one, has discerned a hidden subtext about the loneliness of gay life in the American West. It was Oscar Hammerstein, a passionate liberal activist and, eventually, a staunch proponent of a movement that dreamed of a workable world government, who gave Oklahoma! its political content and message.

That message was not lost on members of the shows original cast. Celeste Holm, who played Ado Annie, the girl who caint say no, would recall how her grandmother, the chairwoman of the drama committee of the New York State Federation of Womens Clubs, had assured her that the play would be the most wonderful musical for right now, when people are going to fight for this country, and may die for it, to be reminded of the kind of courage, the unselfconscious courage, that settled this country. And, indeed, at every performance, there were rows of men in uniform, sitting in seats especially reserved for them, or taking standing room before shipping out overseas. Sometimes, the New York City Fire Department bent the rules and let them stand in the wings.

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Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

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April 14, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

Coming just two decades after the last great global conflict, the Second World War was the most widespread and deadliest war in history, involving more than 30 countries and resulting in more than 50 million military and civilian deaths (with some estimates as high as 85 million dead). Sparked by Adolf Hitlers invasion of Poland in 1939, the war would drag on for six deadly years until the final Allied defeat of both Nazi Germany and Japan in 1945.

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World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

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March 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

CANBERRA, AustraliaThe wreck of an American aircraft carrier sunk during World War II and which President Donald Trump paid tribute to last year has been discovered in deep ocean off Australias coast.

The USS Lexington, one of the first American carriers and nicknamed the Lady Lex, was found 500 miles northeast of Australia in the Coral Sea by billionaire Microsoft co-founder and wreck-hunting enthusiast Paul Allen, lying in water 1.8-miles deep.

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USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

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March 7, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Naval History and Heritage Command

The Naval History and Heritage Command will commemorate the 75th anniversary of the U.S. Navy’s experiences in World War II starting in 2016, with the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, through 2020, with the anniversary of the Japanese surrender ceremony aboard USS Missouri (BB-63), September 2, 1945.

The focal point of the Naval History and Heritage Commands efforts will be this website page. Throughout the multi-year commemoration, material will be added on a regular basis with the ultimate goals of:

Within this section you will be able to view photographs, art, artifacts, archival material and publications covering all aspects of the Navys experiences during the war. Generally set up chronologically, material will be added in advance of upcoming anniversaries, starting with events in late 1941 and early 1942. As the commemoration continues, more material will be added to highlight the important events associated with operations in the Atlantic Theater, the Pacific Theater, and on the home front.

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World War II – Naval History and Heritage Command

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February 22, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Database: Your WW2 History Reference Destination

4 Dec 1941: Japanese invasion fleets departed from various locations for their destinations in Malaya and Thailand. Later this day, America… Read More

4 Dec 1942: Nine Blenheim bombers attacking Tunisian airfields were jumped by 50 German Bf.109 fighters. All nine were destroyed, the last …

4 Dec 1937: Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory became the commanding officer of the No. 12 Group RAF. Read More

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World War II Database: Your WW2 History Reference Destination

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BBC – History: World War Two

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

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BBC – History: World War Two

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World war ii | Define World war ii at Dictionary.com

A war fought from 1939 to 1945 between the Axis powers Germany, Italy, and Japan and the Allies, including France and Britain, and later the Soviet Union and the United States. The war began when the Germans, governed by the Nazi party, invaded Poland in September 1939 (see invasion of Poland). Germany then conquered France, using blitzkrieg tactics, and forced a desperate British withdrawal at Dunkirk. The Germans tried to wear down the British by heavy bombing, but the British withstood the attacks (see Battle of Britain). The Soviet Union signed a treaty with Adolf Hitler but entered the war on the side of the Allies after Germany invaded Russia in 1941. The United States was drawn into the war in 1941, when the Japanese suddenly attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. Japan made extensive conquests in east Asia but was checked by American victories at the Battle of Midway Island and elsewhere. The German invasion of Russia was halted at the Battle of Stalingrad. Allied forces took much of Italy in 1943, forcing its surrender. Beginning with the invasion of Normandy in 1944 (see D-Day), the Allies liberated France from German occupation and pressed on in Europe, defeating the Germans in the Battle of the Bulge and elsewhere. Germany surrendered in May 1945 (see V-E Day). The war in the Pacific ended in September 1945 (see V-J Day), after the United States dropped atomic bombs (see also atomic bomb) on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima (see also Hiroshima) and Nagasaki. In the aftermath of World War II, more constructive and less punitive measures were applied to the defeated countries than after World War I (see Marshall Plan, Nuremberg trials, and United Nations).

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June 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. A Navajo Code Talker who used his native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died. The Navajo Nation says Roy Hawthorne Sr. died Saturday. He was 92. Hawthorne enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at 17 and became part of a famed group of Navajos who transmitted hundreds of messages in their language without error. The code was never broken. Hawthorne was one of the most visible survivors of the group. He appeared at public events and served as vice president of a group representing the men. He never considered himself a hero. Hawthorne later served with the U.S. Army. He’s survived by five children and more than a dozen grandchildren. A funeral service is scheduled Friday.

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April 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

The American musical theater would never be the same, and neither would Rodgers and Hammerstein, who would go on to resounding successes with Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music. At the peak of their powers, in 1957, 14 years to the day after the opening of Oklahoma! Rodgers and Hammerstein produced a live television version of Cinderella for CBS starring Julie Andrews. It was the most-watched television event in history to that point, seen by 107 million viewers at a time when the population of the United States was 170 million. But it was Oklahoma! that started it all. Beginning on the morning of April 1, 1943, tickets became all but unobtainable for the next four years. When Hammersteins tenant farmer in Pennsylvania asked for a pair for his sons wedding, the lyricist responded, Whens the wedding? The farmers answer: The day you can get the tickets. The show was a huge cultural phenomenon that resonated with home-front America in the midst of World War II. The story may have been set in turn-of-the century Indian Territory on the verge of statehood, but its subtext was the determination it had taken to tame the frontier and by implication the courage it would take to defeat fascism in Germany and Japan. When the characters sang the joyous title song, with its proud anticipation of a brand-new state! audiences heard the promise of a brand-new world, one in which the citizens of the newly created United Nations might actually behave and act like brothers, in the words of The Farmer and the Cowman. There had been no such promise in Green Grow the Lilacs, the Theatre Guild play on which Oklahoma! was based, and which had a Broadway run of just 64 performances, in 1931. Its author, Lynn Riggs, a 29-year-old gay cowboy turned poet and playwright, had written an atmospheric tale in which Stephen Sondheim, for one, has discerned a hidden subtext about the loneliness of gay life in the American West. It was Oscar Hammerstein, a passionate liberal activist and, eventually, a staunch proponent of a movement that dreamed of a workable world government, who gave Oklahoma! its political content and message. That message was not lost on members of the shows original cast. Celeste Holm, who played Ado Annie, the girl who caint say no, would recall how her grandmother, the chairwoman of the drama committee of the New York State Federation of Womens Clubs, had assured her that the play would be the most wonderful musical for right now, when people are going to fight for this country, and may die for it, to be reminded of the kind of courage, the unselfconscious courage, that settled this country. And, indeed, at every performance, there were rows of men in uniform, sitting in seats especially reserved for them, or taking standing room before shipping out overseas. Sometimes, the New York City Fire Department bent the rules and let them stand in the wings.

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April 14, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

Coming just two decades after the last great global conflict, the Second World War was the most widespread and deadliest war in history, involving more than 30 countries and resulting in more than 50 million military and civilian deaths (with some estimates as high as 85 million dead). Sparked by Adolf Hitlers invasion of Poland in 1939, the war would drag on for six deadly years until the final Allied defeat of both Nazi Germany and Japan in 1945.

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March 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

CANBERRA, AustraliaThe wreck of an American aircraft carrier sunk during World War II and which President Donald Trump paid tribute to last year has been discovered in deep ocean off Australias coast. The USS Lexington, one of the first American carriers and nicknamed the Lady Lex, was found 500 miles northeast of Australia in the Coral Sea by billionaire Microsoft co-founder and wreck-hunting enthusiast Paul Allen, lying in water 1.8-miles deep.

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March 7, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – ThoughtCo – ThoughtCo.com is the World’s …

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Naval History and Heritage Command

The Naval History and Heritage Command will commemorate the 75th anniversary of the U.S. Navy’s experiences in World War II starting in 2016, with the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, through 2020, with the anniversary of the Japanese surrender ceremony aboard USS Missouri (BB-63), September 2, 1945. The focal point of the Naval History and Heritage Commands efforts will be this website page. Throughout the multi-year commemoration, material will be added on a regular basis with the ultimate goals of: Within this section you will be able to view photographs, art, artifacts, archival material and publications covering all aspects of the Navys experiences during the war. Generally set up chronologically, material will be added in advance of upcoming anniversaries, starting with events in late 1941 and early 1942. As the commemoration continues, more material will be added to highlight the important events associated with operations in the Atlantic Theater, the Pacific Theater, and on the home front.

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February 22, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Database: Your WW2 History Reference Destination

4 Dec 1941: Japanese invasion fleets departed from various locations for their destinations in Malaya and Thailand. Later this day, America… Read More 4 Dec 1942: Nine Blenheim bombers attacking Tunisian airfields were jumped by 50 German Bf.109 fighters. All nine were destroyed, the last … 4 Dec 1937: Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory became the commanding officer of the No. 12 Group RAF. Read More

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December 5, 2017   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

BBC – History: World War Two

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

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December 5, 2017   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed


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