Archive for the ‘World War II’ Category

WWII Memorial

The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Malls central axis. The memorial opened to the public on April 29, 2004 and was dedicated one month later on May 29. It is located on 17th Street, between Constitution and Independence Avenues, and is flanked by the Washington Monument to the east and the Lincoln Memorial to the west. The memorial is operated by the National Park Service and is open to visitors 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For more information about visiting the memorial, accessibility, parking, directions, special events and other details, please visit the National Park Service Web site at www.nps.gov/nwwm or call the Park Service at 202-208-3818.

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WWII Memorial

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August 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Live World War II-era anti-tank round found near US-Mexico …

A World War II-era live ammunition round was found near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Arizona. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

Border agents patrolling near the U.S.-Mexico border fence last week came across an unlikely sight: a live, unexploded World War II-era ammunition round.

The agent, who was assigned to the Brian A. Terry Station in Bisbee, Arizona, found an unexploded MKII 37mm ordnance round, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Tuesday.

A safety perimeter was set up around the ordnance round and an airman with the Explosive Ordinance Disposal Unit from Davis Monthan Air Force Base responded to the scene Tuesday.

After confirming it was a live round, the airman detonated it in place.

The MK2 37 mm round was used by the 37 mm Gun M3, the first dedicated anti-tank gun fielded by the U.S. and first introduced in 1940. It became the standard anti-tank gun of the U.S. infantry as its size allowed for it to be pulled by a jeep.

The U.S. Army used the 37 mm anti-tank gun M3 during World War II, primarily in the Pacific.(U.S. Army)

However, it was rendered ineffective in the battles in Europe because of the rapid improvement of German tanks and, by 1943, it was gradually replaced by the more powerful British-developed 57 mm Gun M1. It remained in service until the end of the war in the Pacific.

Its unclear how the ammunition round ended up at the border fence.

Lucia I. Suarez Sang is a Reporter for FoxNews.com.Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

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Live World War II-era anti-tank round found near US-Mexico …

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July 29, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II intelligence officer gets congressional medal …

DERRY, N.H. A 98-year-old World War II intelligence officer received the highest congressional honor Monday for what a historian described as “defending our country in the shadowy place between diplomacy and war.”

Retired Army Capt. Martin Gelb was part of the Office of Strategic Services, which was created during World War II and was the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency. He served in England, France and Germany on missions that included supporting U.S. and British operations during the D-Day invasion and assisting with the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, who presented Gelb with a bronze replica of the Congressional Gold Medal, said only about 100 of Gelb’s fellow officers are still living and called him a true American hero.

“Capt. Gelb and his fellow operatives fought a secret war. They collected intelligence, they worked behind enemy lines, they developed and advanced weapons and communications equipment, they rescued downed pilots, they helped liberate concentration camps, and yet the courage and bravery was kept classified,” Shaheen said.

From angering his mother by taking apart the family radio at age 7 to a long post-war career at the phone company, Gelb showed a lifelong fascination with how things work. He took apart an early personal computer in the 1980s, and until a few months ago, he was writing computer programs, said his daughter, Nancy Sag.

But the self-described “wiseguy from Brooklyn” initially found himself ill-suited to military life until his radio and electrical skills were noticed and he joined the Office of Strategic Services. Sag didn’t know he was part of the OSS until she was in her 60s.

Gelb said he was overwhelmed by the new attention, which he called “unbelievable.” He said what he most remembers about his time in the Army is the friends he made.

“Unfortunately, I’m the only one that’s still alive. I think of them all the time,” he said. “This occasion has opened up a lot of memories which were stored in my mind that I chose to forget about, but unfortunately, it brings up good and bad memories.”

CIA historian Brent Geary said it wasn’t until the creation of the OSS that the country professionalized intelligence gathering.

“It was courageous, creative and patriotic OSS officers like Capt. Martin Gelb who cleared the way for all of us who have come after, defending our country in the shadowy places between diplomacy and war, collecting information our adversaries want desperately to hide and providing our leaders with the best analysis we can offer of the world’s threats and opportunities,” he said.

But Gelb was humble when an Iraq war veteran stood to thank him for helping set standards that made later wartime victories possible.

“I love the country we have, and I don’t care what anybody says, this is one great country,” he said. “It called upon me and guys like me to perform a task, and we did the best we could.”

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World War II intelligence officer gets congressional medal …

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July 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World war ii | Define World war ii at Dictionary.com

A war fought from 1939 to 1945 between the Axis powers Germany, Italy, and Japan and the Allies, including France and Britain, and later the Soviet Union and the United States. The war began when the Germans, governed by the Nazi party, invaded Poland in September 1939 (see invasion of Poland). Germany then conquered France, using blitzkrieg tactics, and forced a desperate British withdrawal at Dunkirk. The Germans tried to wear down the British by heavy bombing, but the British withstood the attacks (see Battle of Britain). The Soviet Union signed a treaty with Adolf Hitler but entered the war on the side of the Allies after Germany invaded Russia in 1941. The United States was drawn into the war in 1941, when the Japanese suddenly attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. Japan made extensive conquests in east Asia but was checked by American victories at the Battle of Midway Island and elsewhere. The German invasion of Russia was halted at the Battle of Stalingrad. Allied forces took much of Italy in 1943, forcing its surrender. Beginning with the invasion of Normandy in 1944 (see D-Day), the Allies liberated France from German occupation and pressed on in Europe, defeating the Germans in the Battle of the Bulge and elsewhere. Germany surrendered in May 1945 (see V-E Day). The war in the Pacific ended in September 1945 (see V-J Day), after the United States dropped atomic bombs (see also atomic bomb) on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima (see also Hiroshima) and Nagasaki. In the aftermath of World War II, more constructive and less punitive measures were applied to the defeated countries than after World War I (see Marshall Plan, Nuremberg trials, and United Nations).

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June 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. A Navajo Code Talker who used his native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died.

The Navajo Nation says Roy Hawthorne Sr. died Saturday. He was 92.

Hawthorne enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at 17 and became part of a famed group of Navajos who transmitted hundreds of messages in their language without error.

The code was never broken.

Hawthorne was one of the most visible survivors of the group. He appeared at public events and served as vice president of a group representing the men.

He never considered himself a hero.

Hawthorne later served with the U.S. Army.

He’s survived by five children and more than a dozen grandchildren.

A funeral service is scheduled Friday.

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World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

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April 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

The American musical theater would never be the same, and neither would Rodgers and Hammerstein, who would go on to resounding successes with Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music. At the peak of their powers, in 1957, 14 years to the day after the opening of Oklahoma! Rodgers and Hammerstein produced a live television version of Cinderella for CBS starring Julie Andrews. It was the most-watched television event in history to that point, seen by 107 million viewers at a time when the population of the United States was 170 million.

But it was Oklahoma! that started it all. Beginning on the morning of April 1, 1943, tickets became all but unobtainable for the next four years. When Hammersteins tenant farmer in Pennsylvania asked for a pair for his sons wedding, the lyricist responded, Whens the wedding? The farmers answer: The day you can get the tickets.

The show was a huge cultural phenomenon that resonated with home-front America in the midst of World War II. The story may have been set in turn-of-the century Indian Territory on the verge of statehood, but its subtext was the determination it had taken to tame the frontier and by implication the courage it would take to defeat fascism in Germany and Japan. When the characters sang the joyous title song, with its proud anticipation of a brand-new state! audiences heard the promise of a brand-new world, one in which the citizens of the newly created United Nations might actually behave and act like brothers, in the words of The Farmer and the Cowman.

There had been no such promise in Green Grow the Lilacs, the Theatre Guild play on which Oklahoma! was based, and which had a Broadway run of just 64 performances, in 1931. Its author, Lynn Riggs, a 29-year-old gay cowboy turned poet and playwright, had written an atmospheric tale in which Stephen Sondheim, for one, has discerned a hidden subtext about the loneliness of gay life in the American West. It was Oscar Hammerstein, a passionate liberal activist and, eventually, a staunch proponent of a movement that dreamed of a workable world government, who gave Oklahoma! its political content and message.

That message was not lost on members of the shows original cast. Celeste Holm, who played Ado Annie, the girl who caint say no, would recall how her grandmother, the chairwoman of the drama committee of the New York State Federation of Womens Clubs, had assured her that the play would be the most wonderful musical for right now, when people are going to fight for this country, and may die for it, to be reminded of the kind of courage, the unselfconscious courage, that settled this country. And, indeed, at every performance, there were rows of men in uniform, sitting in seats especially reserved for them, or taking standing room before shipping out overseas. Sometimes, the New York City Fire Department bent the rules and let them stand in the wings.

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Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

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April 14, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

Coming just two decades after the last great global conflict, the Second World War was the most widespread and deadliest war in history, involving more than 30 countries and resulting in more than 50 million military and civilian deaths (with some estimates as high as 85 million dead). Sparked by Adolf Hitlers invasion of Poland in 1939, the war would drag on for six deadly years until the final Allied defeat of both Nazi Germany and Japan in 1945.

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World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

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March 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

CANBERRA, AustraliaThe wreck of an American aircraft carrier sunk during World War II and which President Donald Trump paid tribute to last year has been discovered in deep ocean off Australias coast.

The USS Lexington, one of the first American carriers and nicknamed the Lady Lex, was found 500 miles northeast of Australia in the Coral Sea by billionaire Microsoft co-founder and wreck-hunting enthusiast Paul Allen, lying in water 1.8-miles deep.

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USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

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March 7, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – ThoughtCo – ThoughtCo.com is the World’s …

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

WWII Memorial

The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Malls central axis. The memorial opened to the public on April 29, 2004 and was dedicated one month later on May 29. It is located on 17th Street, between Constitution and Independence Avenues, and is flanked by the Washington Monument to the east and the Lincoln Memorial to the west. The memorial is operated by the National Park Service and is open to visitors 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For more information about visiting the memorial, accessibility, parking, directions, special events and other details, please visit the National Park Service Web site at www.nps.gov/nwwm or call the Park Service at 202-208-3818.

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August 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Live World War II-era anti-tank round found near US-Mexico …

A World War II-era live ammunition round was found near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Arizona. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection) Border agents patrolling near the U.S.-Mexico border fence last week came across an unlikely sight: a live, unexploded World War II-era ammunition round. The agent, who was assigned to the Brian A. Terry Station in Bisbee, Arizona, found an unexploded MKII 37mm ordnance round, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Tuesday. A safety perimeter was set up around the ordnance round and an airman with the Explosive Ordinance Disposal Unit from Davis Monthan Air Force Base responded to the scene Tuesday. After confirming it was a live round, the airman detonated it in place. The MK2 37 mm round was used by the 37 mm Gun M3, the first dedicated anti-tank gun fielded by the U.S. and first introduced in 1940. It became the standard anti-tank gun of the U.S. infantry as its size allowed for it to be pulled by a jeep. The U.S. Army used the 37 mm anti-tank gun M3 during World War II, primarily in the Pacific.(U.S. Army) However, it was rendered ineffective in the battles in Europe because of the rapid improvement of German tanks and, by 1943, it was gradually replaced by the more powerful British-developed 57 mm Gun M1. It remained in service until the end of the war in the Pacific. Its unclear how the ammunition round ended up at the border fence. Lucia I. Suarez Sang is a Reporter for FoxNews.com.Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

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July 29, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II intelligence officer gets congressional medal …

DERRY, N.H. A 98-year-old World War II intelligence officer received the highest congressional honor Monday for what a historian described as “defending our country in the shadowy place between diplomacy and war.” Retired Army Capt. Martin Gelb was part of the Office of Strategic Services, which was created during World War II and was the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency. He served in England, France and Germany on missions that included supporting U.S. and British operations during the D-Day invasion and assisting with the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp. U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, who presented Gelb with a bronze replica of the Congressional Gold Medal, said only about 100 of Gelb’s fellow officers are still living and called him a true American hero. “Capt. Gelb and his fellow operatives fought a secret war. They collected intelligence, they worked behind enemy lines, they developed and advanced weapons and communications equipment, they rescued downed pilots, they helped liberate concentration camps, and yet the courage and bravery was kept classified,” Shaheen said. From angering his mother by taking apart the family radio at age 7 to a long post-war career at the phone company, Gelb showed a lifelong fascination with how things work. He took apart an early personal computer in the 1980s, and until a few months ago, he was writing computer programs, said his daughter, Nancy Sag. But the self-described “wiseguy from Brooklyn” initially found himself ill-suited to military life until his radio and electrical skills were noticed and he joined the Office of Strategic Services. Sag didn’t know he was part of the OSS until she was in her 60s. Gelb said he was overwhelmed by the new attention, which he called “unbelievable.” He said what he most remembers about his time in the Army is the friends he made. “Unfortunately, I’m the only one that’s still alive. I think of them all the time,” he said. “This occasion has opened up a lot of memories which were stored in my mind that I chose to forget about, but unfortunately, it brings up good and bad memories.” CIA historian Brent Geary said it wasn’t until the creation of the OSS that the country professionalized intelligence gathering. “It was courageous, creative and patriotic OSS officers like Capt. Martin Gelb who cleared the way for all of us who have come after, defending our country in the shadowy places between diplomacy and war, collecting information our adversaries want desperately to hide and providing our leaders with the best analysis we can offer of the world’s threats and opportunities,” he said. But Gelb was humble when an Iraq war veteran stood to thank him for helping set standards that made later wartime victories possible. “I love the country we have, and I don’t care what anybody says, this is one great country,” he said. “It called upon me and guys like me to perform a task, and we did the best we could.”

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July 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World war ii | Define World war ii at Dictionary.com

A war fought from 1939 to 1945 between the Axis powers Germany, Italy, and Japan and the Allies, including France and Britain, and later the Soviet Union and the United States. The war began when the Germans, governed by the Nazi party, invaded Poland in September 1939 (see invasion of Poland). Germany then conquered France, using blitzkrieg tactics, and forced a desperate British withdrawal at Dunkirk. The Germans tried to wear down the British by heavy bombing, but the British withstood the attacks (see Battle of Britain). The Soviet Union signed a treaty with Adolf Hitler but entered the war on the side of the Allies after Germany invaded Russia in 1941. The United States was drawn into the war in 1941, when the Japanese suddenly attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. Japan made extensive conquests in east Asia but was checked by American victories at the Battle of Midway Island and elsewhere. The German invasion of Russia was halted at the Battle of Stalingrad. Allied forces took much of Italy in 1943, forcing its surrender. Beginning with the invasion of Normandy in 1944 (see D-Day), the Allies liberated France from German occupation and pressed on in Europe, defeating the Germans in the Battle of the Bulge and elsewhere. Germany surrendered in May 1945 (see V-E Day). The war in the Pacific ended in September 1945 (see V-J Day), after the United States dropped atomic bombs (see also atomic bomb) on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima (see also Hiroshima) and Nagasaki. In the aftermath of World War II, more constructive and less punitive measures were applied to the defeated countries than after World War I (see Marshall Plan, Nuremberg trials, and United Nations).

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June 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II Navajo Code Talker dies at 92 | Fox News

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. A Navajo Code Talker who used his native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died. The Navajo Nation says Roy Hawthorne Sr. died Saturday. He was 92. Hawthorne enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at 17 and became part of a famed group of Navajos who transmitted hundreds of messages in their language without error. The code was never broken. Hawthorne was one of the most visible survivors of the group. He appeared at public events and served as vice president of a group representing the men. He never considered himself a hero. Hawthorne later served with the U.S. Army. He’s survived by five children and more than a dozen grandchildren. A funeral service is scheduled Friday.

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April 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

Opinion | The Hamilton of World War II – The New York Times

The American musical theater would never be the same, and neither would Rodgers and Hammerstein, who would go on to resounding successes with Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music. At the peak of their powers, in 1957, 14 years to the day after the opening of Oklahoma! Rodgers and Hammerstein produced a live television version of Cinderella for CBS starring Julie Andrews. It was the most-watched television event in history to that point, seen by 107 million viewers at a time when the population of the United States was 170 million. But it was Oklahoma! that started it all. Beginning on the morning of April 1, 1943, tickets became all but unobtainable for the next four years. When Hammersteins tenant farmer in Pennsylvania asked for a pair for his sons wedding, the lyricist responded, Whens the wedding? The farmers answer: The day you can get the tickets. The show was a huge cultural phenomenon that resonated with home-front America in the midst of World War II. The story may have been set in turn-of-the century Indian Territory on the verge of statehood, but its subtext was the determination it had taken to tame the frontier and by implication the courage it would take to defeat fascism in Germany and Japan. When the characters sang the joyous title song, with its proud anticipation of a brand-new state! audiences heard the promise of a brand-new world, one in which the citizens of the newly created United Nations might actually behave and act like brothers, in the words of The Farmer and the Cowman. There had been no such promise in Green Grow the Lilacs, the Theatre Guild play on which Oklahoma! was based, and which had a Broadway run of just 64 performances, in 1931. Its author, Lynn Riggs, a 29-year-old gay cowboy turned poet and playwright, had written an atmospheric tale in which Stephen Sondheim, for one, has discerned a hidden subtext about the loneliness of gay life in the American West. It was Oscar Hammerstein, a passionate liberal activist and, eventually, a staunch proponent of a movement that dreamed of a workable world government, who gave Oklahoma! its political content and message. That message was not lost on members of the shows original cast. Celeste Holm, who played Ado Annie, the girl who caint say no, would recall how her grandmother, the chairwoman of the drama committee of the New York State Federation of Womens Clubs, had assured her that the play would be the most wonderful musical for right now, when people are going to fight for this country, and may die for it, to be reminded of the kind of courage, the unselfconscious courage, that settled this country. And, indeed, at every performance, there were rows of men in uniform, sitting in seats especially reserved for them, or taking standing room before shipping out overseas. Sometimes, the New York City Fire Department bent the rules and let them stand in the wings.

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April 14, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – Battles, Facts, Videos & Pictures – History.com

Coming just two decades after the last great global conflict, the Second World War was the most widespread and deadliest war in history, involving more than 30 countries and resulting in more than 50 million military and civilian deaths (with some estimates as high as 85 million dead). Sparked by Adolf Hitlers invasion of Poland in 1939, the war would drag on for six deadly years until the final Allied defeat of both Nazi Germany and Japan in 1945.

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March 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

USS Lexington, Sunken World War II Aircraft Carrier, Found …

CANBERRA, AustraliaThe wreck of an American aircraft carrier sunk during World War II and which President Donald Trump paid tribute to last year has been discovered in deep ocean off Australias coast. The USS Lexington, one of the first American carriers and nicknamed the Lady Lex, was found 500 miles northeast of Australia in the Coral Sea by billionaire Microsoft co-founder and wreck-hunting enthusiast Paul Allen, lying in water 1.8-miles deep.

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March 7, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed

World War II – ThoughtCo – ThoughtCo.com is the World’s …

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: World War II  Comments Closed


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