Tracking your every purchase, watching our every move

Major corporations are working right now to install tiny tracking devices on all consumer products, find if we fail to oppose these practices now say authors and activists Albrecht and Mclntyre, our future may look like something from a terrifying sci-fi novel — it will be 1984 in 2010.

Combining massive amounts of research With firsthand reporting. Spychips explains the new RFID technology [which couples radio frequency with highly miniaturized computers] And reveals the history and future of the master planners’ strategies to imbed these trackers on everything — from postage stamps to shoes to people themselves — and spy on Americans without our knowledge or consent. This seemingly innocuous commercial maneuver will inevitably turn our society into a Big Brother nightmare.

Analysts envision a time when the system will be used to identify and track every item on the planet, including you. This book is a clarion call to take action now—to protect our privacy and civil liberties before it’s too late.

KATHERINE ALBRECHT is the founder and director of CASPIAN [Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering]. A Harvard doctoral researcher. Albrecht has emerged as one of the leading voices for privacy in today’s fast changing, high-tech world, providing over a thousand media interviews and testifying on RFID before lawmakers around the globe. Executive Technology magazine calls Katherine “perhaps the country’s single most vocal privacy advocate” and Wired magazine has dubbed her the “Erin Brockovich” of RFID.

LIZ MCINTVRE is CASPIAN’S communications director and the master strategist for many of the organization’s most successful campaigns. As a former bank examiner and CPA, Mclntyre brings meticulous research skills and a keen investigative eye to her reporting on corporate policy-making and bureaucratic misdeeds. Mclntyre is perhaps best known for her lively, accessible treatment of technical topics as the MoneyMom, a family money writer and columnist.

“A masterpiece…”

From the foreword by Bruce Sterling

Big Brother gets up close and personal

Do you know about RFID [Radio Frequency identification]? Well, you should, because in just a few short years, this explosive new technology could tell marketers, criminals, and government snoops everything about you.

Welcome to the world of spychips, where tiny computer chips smaller than a grain of sand will track everyday objects — and even people — keeping tabs on everything you own and everywhere you go. In this startling, eye-opening book, you’ll learn how powerful corporations are planning a future where:

· Strangers will be able to scan the contents of your purse or briefcase from across a room.

· Stores will change prices as you approach — squeezing extra profits out of bargain shoppers and the poor.

· The contents of your refrigerator and medicine cabinet will be remotely monitored.

· Floors, doorways, ceiling tiles, and even picture frames will spy on you — leaving virtually no place to hide.

· Microchip implants will track your every move-and even broadcast your conversations remotely or electroshock you if you step out of line.

This is no conspiracy theory. Hundreds of millions of dollars have already been invested in what global corporations and the governments are calling “the hottest new technology since the bar code.” Unless we stop it now, RFID could strip away our last shreds of privacy and usher in a nightmare world of total surveillance — to keep us all on Big Brother’s very short leash.

Source link: http://www.archive.org/details/SpychipsHowMajorCorporationsAndGovernmentPlanToTrackYourEveryMove

May 8, 2014   Posted in: Censorship |

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