Hawaii judge upholds gay marriage ban – Wisconsin Gazette

A federal judge ruled this week against two Hawaii women who want to get married instead of enter into a civil union, handing a victory to opponents of gay marriage in a state thats been at the forefront of the issue.

U.S. District Court Judge Alan C. Kays ruling sides with Hawaii Health Director Loretta Fuddy and Hawaii Family Forum, a Christian group that was allowed to intervene in the case.

Accordingly, Hawaiis marriage laws are not unconstitutional, the ruling states. Nationwide, citizens are engaged in a robust debate over this divisive social issue. If the traditional institution of marriage is to be reconstructed, as sought by the plaintiffs, it should be done by a democratically elected legislature or the people through a constitutional amendment, and not through the courts.

The lawsuit by Natasha Jackson and Janin Kleid argues they need to be married in order to get certain federal benefits.

Co-plaintiff Gary Bradley wants to marry his foreign national partner to help him change his immigration status. Their attorney, John DAmato, said they will appeal.

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Hawaii judge upholds gay marriage ban – Wisconsin Gazette

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August 11, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage |

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