George Lincoln Rockwell | NEW ORDER

by Martin Kerr THE ROCKWELL YEARS When discussing Movement history, the period 1959-1967 is commonly referred to as The Rockwell Years, and rightly so. George Lincoln Rockwell first raised the Swastika banner in Arlington, Virginia, on March 8, 1959, and Continue reading

by George Lincoln Rockwell [Note: This essay first appeared in the inaugural issue of National Socialist World (Spring, 1966), journal of the World Union of National Socialists. There are multiple online versions of this essay available. However, as with many Continue reading

The followingfamous tale by George Lincoln Rockwell is among the many utteranceswhich caused him to be denounced as an anti-hennite. Under federal legislation which some have proposed, he could have been charged with a hate crime for expressing such bigoted Continue reading

When human hearts break and human souls despair, then from the twilight of the past the great conquerors of distress and care, of shame and misery, of spiritual bondage and physical duress, look down upon them and hold out their Continue reading

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George Lincoln Rockwell | NEW ORDER

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February 19, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell |

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