Vice Reporter: White Nationalists Were Chanting About Jews, Not Confederate Statues – Haaretz

‘They also are focusing on what they call aesthetics. They want to look middle class, successful, good looking’

The Vice News reporter who documented the white supremacists marching in Charlottesville, Virginia was on CBS’s “Face the Nation” (a show Trump calls “deface the nation”) on Sunday saying the marchers were chanting about Jews, not the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue.

“Once they started marching, they didn’t talk about Robert E. Lee being a brilliant military tactician. They chanted about Jews. Like, they wanted to be menacing. It’s not an accident,” Elle Reevetold CBS News’ John Dickerson.

Reeve continued, “These guys didn’t live together, hang out together. They just swarmed together online. And so this is a movement to hold physical space.”

“They’ve taken tactics from left wing organizers and show that they’re strong and they have camaraderie. And they also are focusing on what they call aesthetics. They want to look middle class, successful, good looking. They don’t want to look like the old, as they called it, white trash racist of the old times,” she said.

Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today

Read more:
Vice Reporter: White Nationalists Were Chanting About Jews, Not Confederate Statues – Haaretz

Related Post

August 21, 2017   Posted in: Jews |

Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."