A Government Takeover by the Ku Klux Klan | The New Yorker

The Ku Klux Klan was originally focussed on maintaining the old racial order in the post-Civil War South, chiefly through the violent suppression of African-Americans. But, in the nineteen-twenties, the Klan was reborn as a nationwide movement targeting not only African-Americans but Jews, Catholics, Muslims, Mexican-Americans, and Asian immigrants. In the jingoistic years following the First World War, the Klan made discrimination the new patriotism. The Bancroft Prize-winning historian Linda Gordon charts this rebirth in The Second Coming of the KKK. She writes that millions of people joined the Klan in the span of just a few years, among them mayors, congressmen, senators, and governors. Three Presidents were members of the Klan at some point before taking the office. Gordon tells David Remnick that the lessons for our current political moment are sobering.

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A Government Takeover by the Ku Klux Klan | The New Yorker

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January 25, 2018   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan |

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