Sculpture honoring MLK and Father Hesburgh is unveiled in … – South Bend Tribune

Video: WATCH: Scenes from unveiling of MLK-Hesburgh sculpture in South Bend

It’s also a sign of work yet to be done, he said. “The truth is the struggle for equality and justice in our country, in our time, has not stopped. We’re all part of a bigger tapestry,” Buttigieg said.

The wrappings around the artwork were removed by a group of local children, and the sculpture was greeted by applause.

The artwork is by Granger-based artist Tuck Langland, a retired Indiana University South Bend fine arts professor.

It depictsHesburgh and King joining hands, just as they did at a civil rights rally in Chicago on June 21, 1964. The sculpture is based on a famous photo captured of a scene at that rally.

The Rev. John I. Jenkins, Notre Dame’s president, recalled Hesburgh describing attending that rally in Chicago. King was considered a controversial figure in 1964, and many community leaders including Chicago’s mayor and the city’s Catholic archbishop declined invitations to join him at the rally, Jenkins said.

Someone from King’s staff called Hesburgh on that Sunday morning and asked him to participate. Hesburgh’s response was: “What time do you need me?”, Jenkins said. The priest got in his car, drove to Chicago and joined hands with King and others at the Soldier Field gathering to sing “We Shall Overcome.” An unknown photographer snapped the picture.

Children surround the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Children help unveil a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Rose Meissner, Rev. John l. Lenkins and Virginia Calvin, hold hands in prayer during the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Dr. Virginia Calvin, from the African American Community fund makes remarks during the unveiling of a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Gladys Muhammad hugs Rev. John l. Jenkins prior to the unveiling of a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

A banner depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964 flies near Leighton Plaza where a statue was unveiled, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Sculptor Tuck Langland speaks during the unveiling of his new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

A new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964 stands at Leighton Plaza, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Troy Patterson Thomas recites Martin Luther King’s; “I have a dream,” speech during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Univeristy of Notre Dame President Rev. John l. Jenkins speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Former U.S. Ambassador to India, Tim Roemer speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Former U.S. Ambassador to India, Tim Roemer speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg hugs former U.S. Ambassador to India Tim Roemer during the unveiling of new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks to a crowd during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators take photos of the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators take photos of the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Children surround the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Children help unveil a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Rose Meissner, Rev. John l. Lenkins and Virginia Calvin, hold hands in prayer during the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Dr. Virginia Calvin, from the African American Community fund makes remarks during the unveiling of a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Gladys Muhammad hugs Rev. John l. Jenkins prior to the unveiling of a new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

A banner depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964 flies near Leighton Plaza where a statue was unveiled, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Sculptor Tuck Langland speaks during the unveiling of his new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

A new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964 stands at Leighton Plaza, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Troy Patterson Thomas recites Martin Luther King’s; “I have a dream,” speech during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Univeristy of Notre Dame President Rev. John l. Jenkins speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Former U.S. Ambassador to India, Tim Roemer speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Former U.S. Ambassador to India, Tim Roemer speaks during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg hugs former U.S. Ambassador to India Tim Roemer during the unveiling of new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks to a crowd during the unveiling of a new downtown sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators take photos of the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators take photos of the new sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

Spectators hold hands and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” after the unveiling of a sculpture depicting the late father Hesburgh holding hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the famous photo of them participating in a civil rights march in Chicago in 1964, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in South Bend. Tribune Photo/BECKY MALEWITZ

President Barack Obama was the 2009 commencement speaker at Notre Dame. Jenkins recalled witnessing Hesburgh meet Obama that weekend, and also presenting him with an autographed copy of that famous photo.

With local children surrounding him, Troy Patterson Thomas, of Gary, Ind., gave a stirring recitation of King’s famous 1963 “I Have a Dream Speech.”

Tim Roemer, a former congressman for this district and former ambassador to India, announced a memorial fountain honoring his late father, James Roemer, will be placed near the sculpture. The elder Roemer, who died in 2013, was a lifelong local resident who served as dean of students and later director of community relations at Notre Dame.

Miracle Miller, 12, of South Bend, was excited to attend the ceremony and see the artwork unveiled. “I’ve learned about how we can bring more people together,” she said.

Rozell Newbill of South Bend attended the ceremony with his four sons. A Catholic, Newbill recalled how he knew Hesburgh and got advice from him. “The Holy Spirit brought us together,” he said.

“This is a great honor to see two great men (depicted) in South Bend,” said Deborah Mobley of South Bend.

The sculpture, slightly larger than life size, was funded by private donations.

At the end, the crowd joined hands and sang “We Shall Overcome.”

The artwork is designed to encourage people to stop and join hands with the figures. People in the crowd immediately did so, snapping photos of themselves standing hand in hand with the legendary civil rights leaders.

More here:

Sculpture honoring MLK and Father Hesburgh is unveiled in … – South Bend Tribune

Related Post

June 22, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King |

Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."