Send a letter: It’s time to take down Confederate monuments – Southern Poverty Law Center

Please send a Letter to the Editor to your local newspaper to take down the Confederate monuments in your community. Heres sample language you can use or, better, put it in your own words. Then fill out the form at the bottom of the page to let us know where youve sent it.

Together, we can make our communities safer and our country a placewhere liberty and justice are truly for all.

Dear editor,

White supremacists incited deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last week in defense of a Confederate monument. We must show the country that [your city’s or countys name] gives no safe harbor to such hatred. We must remove the monument at [location].

Confederate symbols on public land, in effect, endorse a movement founded on white supremacy. If our government continues to pay homage to the Confederacy, people of color can never be sure they will be treated fairly. And we will never solve our communitys problems if an entire group of citizens is alienated or feels targeted for discrimination.

Confederate symbols belong in museums and on private property. In museums, we can learn their full history. Citizens will always have the right to fly the Confederate flag. They can still erect monuments on their own property. That will not change.

But it is past time to move our monument to an appropriate place. [Your mayors or county commission presidents name], editors of [your local newspaper], [your member of Congress] and the rest of our community should research how to remove the monument. Then we should act.

Sincerely,

[Your name].

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Send a letter: It’s time to take down Confederate monuments – Southern Poverty Law Center

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Southern Poverty Law Center |

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