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November 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alright | Definition of Alright by Merriam-Webster

Synonyms & Antonyms for alright

Synonyms

acceptably, adequately, all right, creditably, decently, fine, good, middlingly, nicely, OK (or okay), passably, respectably, satisfactorily, serviceably, so-so, sufficiently, tolerably, well

Antonyms

bad, badly, deficiently, ill, inadequately, insufficiently, intolerably, poorly, unacceptably, unsatisfactorily

Although the spelling alright is nearly as old as all right, some critics have insisted alright is all wrong. Nevertheless it has its defenders and its users, who perhaps have been influenced by analogy with altogether and already. It is less frequent than all right but remains common especially in informal writing. It is quite common in fictional dialogue and is sometimes found in more formal writing. the first two years of medical school were alright Gertrude Stein

Recent Examples on the Web

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘alright.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

1865, in the meaning defined above

Comments on alright

What made you want to look up alright? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

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Alright | Definition of Alright by Merriam-Webster

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-Right | Right Wing Watch

To our readers: Right Wing Watch, a project for People For the American Way, is run by a dedicated staff driven to shed light on the activities of right-wing political organizations. As a non-profit working hard every day to expose the Far-Right’s extreme and intolerant agenda, our main source of support is donations from readers like you. If you use Right Wing Watch, please consider making a contribution to support this content.

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Alt-Right | Right Wing Watch

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt Right – BuzzFeed Tag

William Regnery II, a man who inherited millions but struggled in business, tried for 15 years to ignite a racist political movement and failed. Then an unforeseen phenomenon named Donald Trump gave legitimacy to what Regnery had seeded long before: the alt-right. Now, the press-shy white separatist breaks his silence.

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Alt Right – BuzzFeed Tag

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-right | Definition of Alt-right by Merriam-Webster

variants: or less commonly alt right

: a right-wing, primarily online political movement or grouping based in the U.S. whose members reject mainstream conservative politics and espouse extremist beliefs and policies typically centered on ideas of white nationalism Welcome to the alt-right. The label blends together straight-up white supremacists, nationalists who think conservatives have sold out to globalization, and nativists who fear immigration will spur civil disarray. Dylan Matthews Rather than concede the moral high ground to the left, the alt right turns the left’s moralism on its head and makes it a badge of honor to be called “racist,” “homophobic,” and “sexist.” Benjamin Welton Regardless of who triumphs at the ballot box, the biggest winner of this presidential election may be the alt-right: a sprawling coalition of reactionary conservatives who have lobbied to make the United States more “traditional,” more “populist” and more white. Jonathon Morgan often used before another noun an alt-right manifestoSecularism is indeed correlated with greater tolerance of gay marriage and pot legalization. But it’s also making America’s partisan clashes more brutal. And it has contributed to the rise of the so-called alt-right movement, whose members see themselves as proponents of white nationalism. Peter Beinart

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Alt-right | Definition of Alt-right by Merriam-Webster

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October 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

An Alt-Right No-Show – WSJ

Anyone who pays the slightest attention to the daily passage of events in the news was aware that white-supremacist alt-right groups were planning a rally in Washington, D.C., this past weekend. The anticipatory media coverage of the event didnt quite reach Super-Bowl hype levels, but it was close. And the number of white supremacists who showed up for the Sunday rally?

Not 200. Not 100. About 20.

This…

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An Alt-Right No-Show – WSJ

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August 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

How Big Is the Alt Right? Inside My Futile Quest to Count

How many white nationalists live in the United States? Its a question Ive been trying to answer on and off for years. In particular, Ive tried to quantify the groups web-based wingthe slippery, meme-slinging trolls who call themselves the alt-right. Ive worked a lot of angles: totaling the populations of subreddits, counting up the unique visitors to various websites, comparing the number of times Twitter users invoked alt-right hashtags to the times they had more wholesome things to tweet about. (For the record, #dogs beat out #cuck and #whitegenocide every time.) I have squinted at blurry aerial photos of far-right rallies, trying to separate protestor from counterprotester.

None of this produced satisfying answers.

But as we approach the anniversary of the far-right protest that introduced this group to the national conversation, the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which led to the death of anti-racist counterprotester Heather Heyer, its again become a question worth asking. This weekend, Washington, DC, will host a second Unite the Right rally, this one nominally in protest of the alleged abuses suffered by far-right activists in Charlottesville. The organizers can call it whatever they like, but in reality this anniversary rally is one thing only: a public exhibition of the state of the movement.

Its important that we gain a sense of this groups scale. So much of the alt-right movement takes place online, where a handful of aggressive netizens can have the impact of an army. The alt-right has been been consistently successful in drumming up media attention for its online activity, so when they venture off the web to protests like the Unite the Right rally, its easy to project online might onto whatever crowd gathers. But numerically, those offline crowds have been small, and when it comes to voting and purposeful activismthe kind of activities that transform a group of heinous trolls into a political movement, capable of inserting their ideology into laws and elected officialsreal-life size matters.

And so I began to count.

When trying to quantify the members of a movement, the first question is: Who counts? Where the alt-right is concerned, there is no easy answer. So I sat down with a piece of paper and tried to diagram it out. The alt-right includes white supremacists, white nationalists (basically, white supremacists who think white people deserve their own country), neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates, neo-reactionaries (who are anti-democracy), neo-fascists, nativists, mens rights activists and anti-feminists, fundamentalist Christians, nativists and Islamophobes, homophobes, Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites…the list goes on. But identifying with the alt-right doesnt necessarily mean you identify with any of those groups, and vice versa. And within the alt-right, there are micro-communities like the alt-lite (who love trolling and hate being called racist). So my diagramwhich was starting to look like a Final Fantasy bracket from hellwasnt very useful.

I needed a new way to capture what made the alt-right the alt-right, and it couldnt be these fuzzy ideologies. These are the same ideas the extremist right has been kicking around for the last 150 years or so, says Phyllis Gerstenfeld, who teaches courses on online hate crimes and criminology at Cal State Stanislaus. Its the methodology thats changed. A few decades ago, extremists had to rely on IRL word of mouth to spread their ideas, and some incumbent extremist groups (like militias or the KKK) often still do. Maybe I could get some sense of the alt-rights scale from measuring their twist on the far-right recruitment strategy: digital savvy.

But the dynamics of the internet make traffic data, tweet impressions, and subscriber counts meaningless. The alt-right has been on the receiving end of a years-long signal boost, even as the mediamyself includedstruggle to figure out how to cover the activities of these groups without amplifying their message. Yet traffic metrics dont differentiate between the die-hards, the joiners, the hate-readers, and lurkers like me. Tweets might be coming from bots, or a single human helming dozens of accounts, or a small coordinated group of humans who may or may not be tweeting in earnest. And in our polarized digital culture, all hashtag campaigns are destined to be co-opted by the opposite side, for mockery purposes.

Traffic metrics dont differentiate between the die-hards, thejoiners, the hate-readers, and lurkers like me.

Some researchers overcome these opaque numbers by turning to an unlikely group: anti-fascists, whose databases are brimming with names theyve hacked or tricked out of white nationalists But thats hardly a representative (or neutral and unbiased) sample. Back in the day, KKK-style self-reported memberships allowed researchers to roughly track these groups as they would with a voting roll, but today those lists are as outmoded as David Duke. These days, groups form loosely organized local chapters, or stick to private servers: much harder to track, and much harder to quantify. According to Gerstenfeld, your best chance of a solid estimate would be to take a random survey of a representative sample of people and hope they answer your questions honestly. Which is basically setting yourself up to get trolled.

Your best chance at a meaningful sense of scale is at rallies. Meaningful, but not conclusive: Real life gatherings tend to draw out more paramilitary types than meme lords, and because these rallies often turn into riots, crowd estimates are hard to come by. Still, the point of protest is to show your numbers to the world, a kind of head count of those you can count on to support a movement in the open air. In Charlottesville, the best estimates put rally participant numbers between 500 and 600 people. For context, thats five times as big as any far-right rally in the last decade, but is still only a tiny fraction of what youd expect from their (inflated) digital footprint.

Its also two hundred times smaller than 2017s March for Science, and a thousand times smaller than 2017s Womens March. All signs point to an even lower turnout for Unite the Right in DC.

So whats going on here? Well, theres little indication that Charlottesville helped recruitment at all. Two major groups involved in the original rally no longer exist: the organizers, Vanguard America, and the Traditionalist Workers Party, which collapsed after some spectacularly silly internal battles. Keegan Hankes, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that surviving groups like Identity Evropa and Patriot Front may have increased their numbers when the others collapse, but thats overflow, not growth.

And thats big, according to Hankes, because those still left are not down with the rally. Many posts about DCs Unite the Right rally call it a lawsuit trap. Remember, there was a civil rights suit brought against the organizers of Unite the Right, and the judge has issued an opinion that the organizers had conspired to violate the civil rights of Charlottesville citizens, a conspiracy that could legally be tied to the death of Heather Heyer. If I were the folks thinking about participating, I could be quite worried that my participation could link me to violent activity that violates civil rights, says Richard Schragger, who specializes in Constitutional and local government law at the University of Virginia School of Law. Even if youre exercising your First Amendment rights, youre responsible for the outcomes.

The DC Unite the Right rally is shaping up to be a public announcement of a new, more cautious alt-right zeitgeist. Its fuchsia and teal website looks like an 80s video game. The organizer, Jason Kesslerwho, according to Hanke, is now something of a pariahhas banned the swastikas and the other symbols of white supremacy that so many objected to at the last rally. Kessler is trying to massage the movement into something (somewhat) more palatable, similar to the surviving organizations Identity Evropa and Patriot Front. Identity Evropa claims to protect cultural heritage, Patriot Front claims their prejudice is patriotism, and Kessler claims to be a civil rights advocate for white people.

All of which are lies that tell the truth: the open racism we all saw at Charlottesville is being slowly pushed underground.

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How Big Is the Alt Right? Inside My Futile Quest to Count

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August 11, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-right, counter-protestors gather in Berkeley

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BERKELEY Fireworks boomed and smoke filled the air in downtown Berkeley on Sunday as hundreds of counter-protesters confronted several dozen far-right demonstrators, sparking a tense showdown that led to multiple arrests but no major injuries.

Anti-fascist protesters surrounded and shouted down the outnumbered alt-right demonstrators, some of whom wore Army fatigues and combat boots, as they gathered at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park for a No To Marxism in Berkeley rally the latest in a series of standoffs taking place all over the country.

Protesters stood inches apart, screaming in each others faces, and in some cases pushing and shoving one another. Berkeley police had arrested 20 people as of Sunday evening mostly on suspicion of carrying prohibited weapons. Two people taken into custody had scrapes and bloody faces in their mug shots. Police reported three minor injuries, all of which were treated at the scene.

Officer Byron White, Berkeley police public information officer, said he wasoptimistic that there were few injuries. But wed prefer that there is no property damage and no one gets hurt, White said. People should be able to come out to a demonstration and express themselves freely.

Protesters threw homemade fireworks at officers in the area of Milvia and Center streets, prompting police to deploy a smoke canister, White said. As of Sunday afternoon, police reported protesters also had vandalized more than 20 cars, all of which were Berkeley city vehicles smashing their windows and setting one on fire and burned three dumpsters.

The city, under the authority of an emergency ordinance passed earlier this week, prohibited protestors from bringing weapons, signs mounted on sticks or other potentially dangerous items into the area around the park. Masks also were prohibited. Even so, police confiscated dozens of items Sunday, including homemade fireworks; a sledgehammer with a rusty, metal head; wooden poles wrapped with black cloth; black helmets; shields; and pepper spray or mace. Some protesters tried to smuggle in rocks by taping them to the back of their signs, White said.

Police apprehended a truck full of weapons that was trying to access the protest area around 10 a.m. Officers arrested the occupants and confiscated about 30 banned items from the vehicle, White said.

White wouldnt disclose whether the people caught with weapons were alt-right demonstrators, anti-fascist protesters, or both.

The far-right demonstrators who gathered in the park Sunday said they were there to stamp out communism in the U.S.

Go to hell, you commie scum,Contra Costa resident Amber Cummings, who organized the alt-right demonstration, boomed through a bullhorn.

In response, several hundred counter-protesters turned out to protest fascism.

I am here because we have to have a counter-protest to the far-right fascists, said 64-year-old retiree Luma Nichol, a member of the Freedom Socialist Party. It is important we outnumber them. Hitler himself said he could have been stopped when he only had small groups of supporters.

Counter-protesters shouted Nazis go home, and Charlottesville never again, drowning out what the far-right demonstrators were yelling back.

Far-left bookstore Revolution Books set up a sign and display of books at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. People affiliated with the bookstore chanted, America was never great, and dragged an American flag along the ground.

In response, far-right protesters ripped down the bookstores display.

Meanwhile, additional counter-protesters gathered a few blocks away at Ohlone Park and marched through downtown Berkeley.Police blocked off Martin Luther King Jr. Way and other streets surrounding the park.

One group of counter-protesters showed up wearing red T-shirts identifying them as members of the Democratic Socialists of America, and carrying small signs that said, Always anti-fascist.

Another group used the rally to protest the Trump administrations immigration policy, carrying signs that said, No human being is illegal.

Others wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. A woman walked up to a group of Alameda County Sheriffs Office deputies carrying a sign that said, Cops and Klan go hand in hand. She stared at the deputies, and then walked away.

Dozens of law enforcement officers from agencies including the Berkeley Police Department, Alameda County Sheriffs Office, Oakland Police Department, Hayward Police Department and San Leandro Police Department were on the scene in riot gear. They intervened to separate protesters when confrontations got physical, and made arrests.

Sunday wasnt the first time Berkeley has hosted clashes between alt-right and anti-fascist protesters. Demonstrations here early last year after the election of President Donald Trumpturned bloody, with rocks and fireworks thrown and people beaten and maced. Twenty people were arrested at the April 15 rally that was dubbed the battle of Berkeley.

But the alt-rights last attempt at a rally a year ago largely fizzled as hundreds of anti-fascist demonstrators, known as antifa, flooded the area.

Berkeley became a target of the alt-right shortly after Trumps 2016 election victory. Its members began protesting at Cal, calling the university a center for liberal indoctrination. They also have made claims that the city is a hotbed of new communism, and several times have stormed Revolution Books.

The tense scene Sunday in Berkeley unfolded a day after police in Portland, Oregon, had used flash-bang grenades and other measures to break up similar protests there.The Oregonian reported that police in riot gear fired flash-bang grenades at counter-protesters who were throwing objects at police and had refused to disperse.

Joey Gibson, leader of the far-right group Patriot Prayer and a fringe Republican candidate in Tuesdays open U.S. Senate primary in Washington, said he wouldnt attend Sunday. At least one other alt-right group, from Arizona, also pulled out of the Berkeley event.

In Berkeley, police closed off more streets Sunday than for past demonstrations.

Some of the past events have gotten quite chaotic, White said, and we certainly dont want anybody to get hurt by a car speeding past or worse.

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Alt-right, counter-protestors gather in Berkeley

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August 10, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Unite the Right 2: alt-right to rally in DC one year after …

At last years Unite the Right rally, hundreds of members of the alt-right and white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, purportedly to defend a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, as it faced removal approved by the City Council. The event was supposed to be the alt-rights zenith, coming into its own as a real political force with real political power and, tangentially, grabbing the ear of the president.

The event began with a torchlit rally where attendees shouted, You will not replace us! (some replacing you with Jews). The next day, the event attracted a counterprotest, during which a self-avowed Nazi sympathizer drove a car into a crowd, killing a young woman. Afterward, President Donald Trump famously remarked that there were very fine people on both sides. The events werent the high point of the alt-right but the beginning of the end of the alt-rights real or imagined political effectiveness.

And on August 12, theyre doing it again this time, outside the White House.

Its not clear how many people will attend Unite the Right 2 many white nationalists have already said they have no interest in going, while others who might otherwise attend are enmeshed in legal troubles stemming from last years rally. Meanwhile, organizers of the coalition DC Against Hate have told at least one outlet that they expect at least 1,000 counterprotesters to attend events aimed against Unite the Right 2 under the banner Shut It Down DC.

A year ago, members of the alt-right felt strong enough to venture off the internet and into the real world. Now, the movement has largely been broken by the law, by widespread disapproval, and mostly by their own actions and Unite the Right 2 could represent its last stand.

On May 8, white civil rights activist Jason Kessler filed an application with the National Park Service to hold a rally of about 400 people in Lafayette Park, directly across from the White House. His stated purpose: Protesting civil rights abuse in Charlottesville Va / white civil rights rally. Kessler, who organized last years debacle, initially applied for the rally to be held in Charlottesville again. His application was turned down by the city, however, and his subsequent efforts to sue the city for denying his application failed.

His application to march in Washington, DC, though, was approved in full by the National Park Service on August 5.

The current plan is to travel on the Metro from Vienna, Virginia, to the Foggy Bottom station (near George Washington University) in DC, then to march to Lafayette Square for a two-hour rally with speeches from figures like alt-right Wisconsin candidate Paul Nehlen, who may attend. American flags and Confederate flags are permitted, but Nazi flags, unlike last year, are not.

On the rallys website, organizers warned: ALWAYS Be aware of your surroundings. Do not talk to the media. Do not engage in any fighting. ALWAYS be a good representative for our cause.

But coordinating this event has seemingly been chaotic at best, as revealed by recent internal Facebook chats from Unite the Right planners (obtained from an anonymous source by the media collective Unicorn Riot, a left-leaning investigative journalism nonprofit). The chats appear to show Kessler arguing with other planners about a wide range of issues. Those include basic logistics like transportation and housing; whether or not a nonwhite speaker would give them political cover to have major white supremacist figures speak as well; and whether theres a good way to normalize anti-Semitism without appearing to do so (in other words, without using anti-Semitic memes).

Ironically, in the midst of discussions about which neo-Nazi groups could provide security for rallygoers, Kessler sort of seemed to try to tamp down violent rhetoric. As Unicorn Riot wrote (bolded words attributed to Kessler from the Facebook group chat):

Likely inspired by his ongoing legal problems, Kessler at times expressed concerns at the violent rhetoric being used in his Unite The Right 2 planning chat. Please dont talk about fighting anyone at the rally, he wrote on May 28. Hurts the legal situation. He also chastised other event co-planners for discussing whether their security team should plan for violence: this is absolutely the wrong kind of thing to be talking about on Facebook.

Unmentioned in the Facebook chats is just how many white nationalist groups like the neo-Confederate and white supremacist group League of the South, for example have little to no interest in Unite the Right 2.

To understand the shambolic disorganization of Unite the Right 2, its critical to understand its predecessor.

As my colleague Dara Lind wrote on the alt-right in 2017:

In 2015 and 2016, the alt-right was an inescapable online presence, with some of its members crediting the movements meme magic with the unexpected popularity of Donald Trump in the Republican presidential primary and, later, the general election. With Trumps election, some of its leaders have become more seriously engaged in politics, via pro-Trump organizations like the Proud Boys and the Alt-Knights.

Like Trump himself, alt-right leaders didnt start out by explicitly aligning themselves with the sort of right-wing groups and movements that almost everyone in 2017 America is willing to agree are racist like the Nazis or the Ku Klux Klan. But racist rhetoric has become a hallmark of the movement, from the use of cuck to deride anti-alt-right conservatives to Twitter harassment of Jewish journalists by Photoshopping them into images of Nazi gas chambers.

Around this time, the statue of Robert E. Lee was targeted by activists for removal from a park in Charlottesville after the murder of nine black churchgoers in Charleston by a white supremacist. The alt-right saw this as the perfect moment to gather to defend Southern heritage. But as the planning for the event commenced, the tenor and tone of the rally soon shifted. As Lind wrote, the rally turned from an ostensible attempt to bring a broad coalition of conservative groups together to protest the controversial removal of a statue, to a Nazified rally for the pro-white movement in America.

The 2017 edition of Unite the Right was intended by its organizers and supporters to be a pivotal moment for white supremacists and the alt-right, featuring some of that movements biggest names, from white nationalist spokesperson-of-sorts Richard Spencer to Matthew Heimbach of the Traditional Workers Party, a neo-Nazi group.

But thats not what happened. Instead of marking a high point for the pro-white movement, the tiki torch-lit march on August 11 and the violence of the rally the next day resulted in the killing of Heather Heyer and universal condemnation. Since August 12, 2017, the alt-right has been dealt several blows.

Organizers of the 2017 Unite the Right have been embroiled in lawsuits filed by victims of the violence that took place. Many of the alt-rights biggest personalities, like Richard Spencer, lost funding platforms because, understandably, platforms like Patreon and PayPal didnt want to be associated with advocates for the return of the Third Reich. Other alt-right figures are involved in legal proceedings related to, for instance, harassing a Jewish woman online, or participation in a trailer park brawl.

One white nationalist attendee (best known for sobbing uncontrollably at the thought of his imminent arrest) was even recently banned from entering the state of Virginia. Kessler himself tweeted insults about the young woman killed during the rally, then blamed his tweets on a combination of Ambien and Xanax when even his fellow rallygoers disavowed him. And politically, the rally only served to, in the words of the New York Times, empower a leftist political coalition that vows to confront generations of racial and economic injustice in Charlottesville.

On a larger scale, as the Atlantics Angela Nagle wrote in December 2017, the violence of Unite the Right put into sharp relief the distinct difference between what the alt-right purported itself to be (people posting fun memes mocking so-called political correctness), and what it actually became (a cover for racists and anti-Semites, complete with Nazi insignia and swastikas):

The rally brought into the open the movements racist corenot the winking shit-posters and fuzzy-faced geeks wearing obscure-internet-joke T-shirts, but a small army of unapologetic white nationalists. Anyone who flirted with the alt-right now understood what they were pledging allegiance to. … Charlottesville changed everything, [Gavin McInnes, who had previously associated with alt-right elements] said to Boston Herald Radio. I dont advocate the alt-right. I dont advocate their politics.

It should be noted, however, that many of the attendees of Unite the Right clearly knew exactly what the point of the event was.

For those targeted by the denizens of the alt-right those whose images were photoshopped into Nazi gas chambers and who received harassing tweets and emails for months the alt-right was always a cesspool of hate.

But for casual observers, people who arent on Twitter and dont visit Breitbart the platform for the alt-right, in the words of former Breitbart chair and White House strategist Steve Bannon Charlottesville made that reality all too real.

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Unite the Right 2: alt-right to rally in DC one year after …

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Occidental Dissent Nationalism, Populism, Reaction

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November 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alright | Definition of Alright by Merriam-Webster

Synonyms & Antonyms for alright Synonyms acceptably, adequately, all right, creditably, decently, fine, good, middlingly, nicely, OK (or okay), passably, respectably, satisfactorily, serviceably, so-so, sufficiently, tolerably, well Antonyms bad, badly, deficiently, ill, inadequately, insufficiently, intolerably, poorly, unacceptably, unsatisfactorily Although the spelling alright is nearly as old as all right, some critics have insisted alright is all wrong. Nevertheless it has its defenders and its users, who perhaps have been influenced by analogy with altogether and already. It is less frequent than all right but remains common especially in informal writing. It is quite common in fictional dialogue and is sometimes found in more formal writing. the first two years of medical school were alright Gertrude Stein Recent Examples on the Web These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘alright.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback. 1865, in the meaning defined above Comments on alright What made you want to look up alright? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-Right | Right Wing Watch

To our readers: Right Wing Watch, a project for People For the American Way, is run by a dedicated staff driven to shed light on the activities of right-wing political organizations. As a non-profit working hard every day to expose the Far-Right’s extreme and intolerant agenda, our main source of support is donations from readers like you. If you use Right Wing Watch, please consider making a contribution to support this content.

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt Right – BuzzFeed Tag

William Regnery II, a man who inherited millions but struggled in business, tried for 15 years to ignite a racist political movement and failed. Then an unforeseen phenomenon named Donald Trump gave legitimacy to what Regnery had seeded long before: the alt-right. Now, the press-shy white separatist breaks his silence.

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November 1, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-right | Definition of Alt-right by Merriam-Webster

variants: or less commonly alt right : a right-wing, primarily online political movement or grouping based in the U.S. whose members reject mainstream conservative politics and espouse extremist beliefs and policies typically centered on ideas of white nationalism Welcome to the alt-right. The label blends together straight-up white supremacists, nationalists who think conservatives have sold out to globalization, and nativists who fear immigration will spur civil disarray. Dylan Matthews Rather than concede the moral high ground to the left, the alt right turns the left’s moralism on its head and makes it a badge of honor to be called “racist,” “homophobic,” and “sexist.” Benjamin Welton Regardless of who triumphs at the ballot box, the biggest winner of this presidential election may be the alt-right: a sprawling coalition of reactionary conservatives who have lobbied to make the United States more “traditional,” more “populist” and more white. Jonathon Morgan often used before another noun an alt-right manifestoSecularism is indeed correlated with greater tolerance of gay marriage and pot legalization. But it’s also making America’s partisan clashes more brutal. And it has contributed to the rise of the so-called alt-right movement, whose members see themselves as proponents of white nationalism. Peter Beinart

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October 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

An Alt-Right No-Show – WSJ

Anyone who pays the slightest attention to the daily passage of events in the news was aware that white-supremacist alt-right groups were planning a rally in Washington, D.C., this past weekend. The anticipatory media coverage of the event didnt quite reach Super-Bowl hype levels, but it was close. And the number of white supremacists who showed up for the Sunday rally? Not 200. Not 100. About 20. This…

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August 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

How Big Is the Alt Right? Inside My Futile Quest to Count

How many white nationalists live in the United States? Its a question Ive been trying to answer on and off for years. In particular, Ive tried to quantify the groups web-based wingthe slippery, meme-slinging trolls who call themselves the alt-right. Ive worked a lot of angles: totaling the populations of subreddits, counting up the unique visitors to various websites, comparing the number of times Twitter users invoked alt-right hashtags to the times they had more wholesome things to tweet about. (For the record, #dogs beat out #cuck and #whitegenocide every time.) I have squinted at blurry aerial photos of far-right rallies, trying to separate protestor from counterprotester. None of this produced satisfying answers. But as we approach the anniversary of the far-right protest that introduced this group to the national conversation, the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which led to the death of anti-racist counterprotester Heather Heyer, its again become a question worth asking. This weekend, Washington, DC, will host a second Unite the Right rally, this one nominally in protest of the alleged abuses suffered by far-right activists in Charlottesville. The organizers can call it whatever they like, but in reality this anniversary rally is one thing only: a public exhibition of the state of the movement. Its important that we gain a sense of this groups scale. So much of the alt-right movement takes place online, where a handful of aggressive netizens can have the impact of an army. The alt-right has been been consistently successful in drumming up media attention for its online activity, so when they venture off the web to protests like the Unite the Right rally, its easy to project online might onto whatever crowd gathers. But numerically, those offline crowds have been small, and when it comes to voting and purposeful activismthe kind of activities that transform a group of heinous trolls into a political movement, capable of inserting their ideology into laws and elected officialsreal-life size matters. And so I began to count. When trying to quantify the members of a movement, the first question is: Who counts? Where the alt-right is concerned, there is no easy answer. So I sat down with a piece of paper and tried to diagram it out. The alt-right includes white supremacists, white nationalists (basically, white supremacists who think white people deserve their own country), neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates, neo-reactionaries (who are anti-democracy), neo-fascists, nativists, mens rights activists and anti-feminists, fundamentalist Christians, nativists and Islamophobes, homophobes, Holocaust deniers and other anti-Semites…the list goes on. But identifying with the alt-right doesnt necessarily mean you identify with any of those groups, and vice versa. And within the alt-right, there are micro-communities like the alt-lite (who love trolling and hate being called racist). So my diagramwhich was starting to look like a Final Fantasy bracket from hellwasnt very useful. I needed a new way to capture what made the alt-right the alt-right, and it couldnt be these fuzzy ideologies. These are the same ideas the extremist right has been kicking around for the last 150 years or so, says Phyllis Gerstenfeld, who teaches courses on online hate crimes and criminology at Cal State Stanislaus. Its the methodology thats changed. A few decades ago, extremists had to rely on IRL word of mouth to spread their ideas, and some incumbent extremist groups (like militias or the KKK) often still do. Maybe I could get some sense of the alt-rights scale from measuring their twist on the far-right recruitment strategy: digital savvy. But the dynamics of the internet make traffic data, tweet impressions, and subscriber counts meaningless. The alt-right has been on the receiving end of a years-long signal boost, even as the mediamyself includedstruggle to figure out how to cover the activities of these groups without amplifying their message. Yet traffic metrics dont differentiate between the die-hards, the joiners, the hate-readers, and lurkers like me. Tweets might be coming from bots, or a single human helming dozens of accounts, or a small coordinated group of humans who may or may not be tweeting in earnest. And in our polarized digital culture, all hashtag campaigns are destined to be co-opted by the opposite side, for mockery purposes. Traffic metrics dont differentiate between the die-hards, thejoiners, the hate-readers, and lurkers like me. Some researchers overcome these opaque numbers by turning to an unlikely group: anti-fascists, whose databases are brimming with names theyve hacked or tricked out of white nationalists But thats hardly a representative (or neutral and unbiased) sample. Back in the day, KKK-style self-reported memberships allowed researchers to roughly track these groups as they would with a voting roll, but today those lists are as outmoded as David Duke. These days, groups form loosely organized local chapters, or stick to private servers: much harder to track, and much harder to quantify. According to Gerstenfeld, your best chance of a solid estimate would be to take a random survey of a representative sample of people and hope they answer your questions honestly. Which is basically setting yourself up to get trolled. Your best chance at a meaningful sense of scale is at rallies. Meaningful, but not conclusive: Real life gatherings tend to draw out more paramilitary types than meme lords, and because these rallies often turn into riots, crowd estimates are hard to come by. Still, the point of protest is to show your numbers to the world, a kind of head count of those you can count on to support a movement in the open air. In Charlottesville, the best estimates put rally participant numbers between 500 and 600 people. For context, thats five times as big as any far-right rally in the last decade, but is still only a tiny fraction of what youd expect from their (inflated) digital footprint. Its also two hundred times smaller than 2017s March for Science, and a thousand times smaller than 2017s Womens March. All signs point to an even lower turnout for Unite the Right in DC. So whats going on here? Well, theres little indication that Charlottesville helped recruitment at all. Two major groups involved in the original rally no longer exist: the organizers, Vanguard America, and the Traditionalist Workers Party, which collapsed after some spectacularly silly internal battles. Keegan Hankes, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, says that surviving groups like Identity Evropa and Patriot Front may have increased their numbers when the others collapse, but thats overflow, not growth. And thats big, according to Hankes, because those still left are not down with the rally. Many posts about DCs Unite the Right rally call it a lawsuit trap. Remember, there was a civil rights suit brought against the organizers of Unite the Right, and the judge has issued an opinion that the organizers had conspired to violate the civil rights of Charlottesville citizens, a conspiracy that could legally be tied to the death of Heather Heyer. If I were the folks thinking about participating, I could be quite worried that my participation could link me to violent activity that violates civil rights, says Richard Schragger, who specializes in Constitutional and local government law at the University of Virginia School of Law. Even if youre exercising your First Amendment rights, youre responsible for the outcomes. The DC Unite the Right rally is shaping up to be a public announcement of a new, more cautious alt-right zeitgeist. Its fuchsia and teal website looks like an 80s video game. The organizer, Jason Kesslerwho, according to Hanke, is now something of a pariahhas banned the swastikas and the other symbols of white supremacy that so many objected to at the last rally. Kessler is trying to massage the movement into something (somewhat) more palatable, similar to the surviving organizations Identity Evropa and Patriot Front. Identity Evropa claims to protect cultural heritage, Patriot Front claims their prejudice is patriotism, and Kessler claims to be a civil rights advocate for white people. All of which are lies that tell the truth: the open racism we all saw at Charlottesville is being slowly pushed underground.

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August 11, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Alt-right, counter-protestors gather in Berkeley

Click HERE if youre having trouble viewing the gallery on your mobile device. BERKELEY Fireworks boomed and smoke filled the air in downtown Berkeley on Sunday as hundreds of counter-protesters confronted several dozen far-right demonstrators, sparking a tense showdown that led to multiple arrests but no major injuries. Anti-fascist protesters surrounded and shouted down the outnumbered alt-right demonstrators, some of whom wore Army fatigues and combat boots, as they gathered at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park for a No To Marxism in Berkeley rally the latest in a series of standoffs taking place all over the country. Protesters stood inches apart, screaming in each others faces, and in some cases pushing and shoving one another. Berkeley police had arrested 20 people as of Sunday evening mostly on suspicion of carrying prohibited weapons. Two people taken into custody had scrapes and bloody faces in their mug shots. Police reported three minor injuries, all of which were treated at the scene. Officer Byron White, Berkeley police public information officer, said he wasoptimistic that there were few injuries. But wed prefer that there is no property damage and no one gets hurt, White said. People should be able to come out to a demonstration and express themselves freely. Protesters threw homemade fireworks at officers in the area of Milvia and Center streets, prompting police to deploy a smoke canister, White said. As of Sunday afternoon, police reported protesters also had vandalized more than 20 cars, all of which were Berkeley city vehicles smashing their windows and setting one on fire and burned three dumpsters. The city, under the authority of an emergency ordinance passed earlier this week, prohibited protestors from bringing weapons, signs mounted on sticks or other potentially dangerous items into the area around the park. Masks also were prohibited. Even so, police confiscated dozens of items Sunday, including homemade fireworks; a sledgehammer with a rusty, metal head; wooden poles wrapped with black cloth; black helmets; shields; and pepper spray or mace. Some protesters tried to smuggle in rocks by taping them to the back of their signs, White said. Police apprehended a truck full of weapons that was trying to access the protest area around 10 a.m. Officers arrested the occupants and confiscated about 30 banned items from the vehicle, White said. White wouldnt disclose whether the people caught with weapons were alt-right demonstrators, anti-fascist protesters, or both. The far-right demonstrators who gathered in the park Sunday said they were there to stamp out communism in the U.S. Go to hell, you commie scum,Contra Costa resident Amber Cummings, who organized the alt-right demonstration, boomed through a bullhorn. In response, several hundred counter-protesters turned out to protest fascism. I am here because we have to have a counter-protest to the far-right fascists, said 64-year-old retiree Luma Nichol, a member of the Freedom Socialist Party. It is important we outnumber them. Hitler himself said he could have been stopped when he only had small groups of supporters. Counter-protesters shouted Nazis go home, and Charlottesville never again, drowning out what the far-right demonstrators were yelling back. Far-left bookstore Revolution Books set up a sign and display of books at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. People affiliated with the bookstore chanted, America was never great, and dragged an American flag along the ground. In response, far-right protesters ripped down the bookstores display. Meanwhile, additional counter-protesters gathered a few blocks away at Ohlone Park and marched through downtown Berkeley.Police blocked off Martin Luther King Jr. Way and other streets surrounding the park. One group of counter-protesters showed up wearing red T-shirts identifying them as members of the Democratic Socialists of America, and carrying small signs that said, Always anti-fascist. Another group used the rally to protest the Trump administrations immigration policy, carrying signs that said, No human being is illegal. Others wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. A woman walked up to a group of Alameda County Sheriffs Office deputies carrying a sign that said, Cops and Klan go hand in hand. She stared at the deputies, and then walked away. Dozens of law enforcement officers from agencies including the Berkeley Police Department, Alameda County Sheriffs Office, Oakland Police Department, Hayward Police Department and San Leandro Police Department were on the scene in riot gear. They intervened to separate protesters when confrontations got physical, and made arrests. Sunday wasnt the first time Berkeley has hosted clashes between alt-right and anti-fascist protesters. Demonstrations here early last year after the election of President Donald Trumpturned bloody, with rocks and fireworks thrown and people beaten and maced. Twenty people were arrested at the April 15 rally that was dubbed the battle of Berkeley. But the alt-rights last attempt at a rally a year ago largely fizzled as hundreds of anti-fascist demonstrators, known as antifa, flooded the area. Berkeley became a target of the alt-right shortly after Trumps 2016 election victory. Its members began protesting at Cal, calling the university a center for liberal indoctrination. They also have made claims that the city is a hotbed of new communism, and several times have stormed Revolution Books. The tense scene Sunday in Berkeley unfolded a day after police in Portland, Oregon, had used flash-bang grenades and other measures to break up similar protests there.The Oregonian reported that police in riot gear fired flash-bang grenades at counter-protesters who were throwing objects at police and had refused to disperse. Joey Gibson, leader of the far-right group Patriot Prayer and a fringe Republican candidate in Tuesdays open U.S. Senate primary in Washington, said he wouldnt attend Sunday. At least one other alt-right group, from Arizona, also pulled out of the Berkeley event. In Berkeley, police closed off more streets Sunday than for past demonstrations. Some of the past events have gotten quite chaotic, White said, and we certainly dont want anybody to get hurt by a car speeding past or worse.

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August 10, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed

Unite the Right 2: alt-right to rally in DC one year after …

At last years Unite the Right rally, hundreds of members of the alt-right and white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, purportedly to defend a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, as it faced removal approved by the City Council. The event was supposed to be the alt-rights zenith, coming into its own as a real political force with real political power and, tangentially, grabbing the ear of the president. The event began with a torchlit rally where attendees shouted, You will not replace us! (some replacing you with Jews). The next day, the event attracted a counterprotest, during which a self-avowed Nazi sympathizer drove a car into a crowd, killing a young woman. Afterward, President Donald Trump famously remarked that there were very fine people on both sides. The events werent the high point of the alt-right but the beginning of the end of the alt-rights real or imagined political effectiveness. And on August 12, theyre doing it again this time, outside the White House. Its not clear how many people will attend Unite the Right 2 many white nationalists have already said they have no interest in going, while others who might otherwise attend are enmeshed in legal troubles stemming from last years rally. Meanwhile, organizers of the coalition DC Against Hate have told at least one outlet that they expect at least 1,000 counterprotesters to attend events aimed against Unite the Right 2 under the banner Shut It Down DC. A year ago, members of the alt-right felt strong enough to venture off the internet and into the real world. Now, the movement has largely been broken by the law, by widespread disapproval, and mostly by their own actions and Unite the Right 2 could represent its last stand. On May 8, white civil rights activist Jason Kessler filed an application with the National Park Service to hold a rally of about 400 people in Lafayette Park, directly across from the White House. His stated purpose: Protesting civil rights abuse in Charlottesville Va / white civil rights rally. Kessler, who organized last years debacle, initially applied for the rally to be held in Charlottesville again. His application was turned down by the city, however, and his subsequent efforts to sue the city for denying his application failed. His application to march in Washington, DC, though, was approved in full by the National Park Service on August 5. The current plan is to travel on the Metro from Vienna, Virginia, to the Foggy Bottom station (near George Washington University) in DC, then to march to Lafayette Square for a two-hour rally with speeches from figures like alt-right Wisconsin candidate Paul Nehlen, who may attend. American flags and Confederate flags are permitted, but Nazi flags, unlike last year, are not. On the rallys website, organizers warned: ALWAYS Be aware of your surroundings. Do not talk to the media. Do not engage in any fighting. ALWAYS be a good representative for our cause. But coordinating this event has seemingly been chaotic at best, as revealed by recent internal Facebook chats from Unite the Right planners (obtained from an anonymous source by the media collective Unicorn Riot, a left-leaning investigative journalism nonprofit). The chats appear to show Kessler arguing with other planners about a wide range of issues. Those include basic logistics like transportation and housing; whether or not a nonwhite speaker would give them political cover to have major white supremacist figures speak as well; and whether theres a good way to normalize anti-Semitism without appearing to do so (in other words, without using anti-Semitic memes). Ironically, in the midst of discussions about which neo-Nazi groups could provide security for rallygoers, Kessler sort of seemed to try to tamp down violent rhetoric. As Unicorn Riot wrote (bolded words attributed to Kessler from the Facebook group chat): Likely inspired by his ongoing legal problems, Kessler at times expressed concerns at the violent rhetoric being used in his Unite The Right 2 planning chat. Please dont talk about fighting anyone at the rally, he wrote on May 28. Hurts the legal situation. He also chastised other event co-planners for discussing whether their security team should plan for violence: this is absolutely the wrong kind of thing to be talking about on Facebook. Unmentioned in the Facebook chats is just how many white nationalist groups like the neo-Confederate and white supremacist group League of the South, for example have little to no interest in Unite the Right 2. To understand the shambolic disorganization of Unite the Right 2, its critical to understand its predecessor. As my colleague Dara Lind wrote on the alt-right in 2017: In 2015 and 2016, the alt-right was an inescapable online presence, with some of its members crediting the movements meme magic with the unexpected popularity of Donald Trump in the Republican presidential primary and, later, the general election. With Trumps election, some of its leaders have become more seriously engaged in politics, via pro-Trump organizations like the Proud Boys and the Alt-Knights. Like Trump himself, alt-right leaders didnt start out by explicitly aligning themselves with the sort of right-wing groups and movements that almost everyone in 2017 America is willing to agree are racist like the Nazis or the Ku Klux Klan. But racist rhetoric has become a hallmark of the movement, from the use of cuck to deride anti-alt-right conservatives to Twitter harassment of Jewish journalists by Photoshopping them into images of Nazi gas chambers. Around this time, the statue of Robert E. Lee was targeted by activists for removal from a park in Charlottesville after the murder of nine black churchgoers in Charleston by a white supremacist. The alt-right saw this as the perfect moment to gather to defend Southern heritage. But as the planning for the event commenced, the tenor and tone of the rally soon shifted. As Lind wrote, the rally turned from an ostensible attempt to bring a broad coalition of conservative groups together to protest the controversial removal of a statue, to a Nazified rally for the pro-white movement in America. The 2017 edition of Unite the Right was intended by its organizers and supporters to be a pivotal moment for white supremacists and the alt-right, featuring some of that movements biggest names, from white nationalist spokesperson-of-sorts Richard Spencer to Matthew Heimbach of the Traditional Workers Party, a neo-Nazi group. But thats not what happened. Instead of marking a high point for the pro-white movement, the tiki torch-lit march on August 11 and the violence of the rally the next day resulted in the killing of Heather Heyer and universal condemnation. Since August 12, 2017, the alt-right has been dealt several blows. Organizers of the 2017 Unite the Right have been embroiled in lawsuits filed by victims of the violence that took place. Many of the alt-rights biggest personalities, like Richard Spencer, lost funding platforms because, understandably, platforms like Patreon and PayPal didnt want to be associated with advocates for the return of the Third Reich. Other alt-right figures are involved in legal proceedings related to, for instance, harassing a Jewish woman online, or participation in a trailer park brawl. One white nationalist attendee (best known for sobbing uncontrollably at the thought of his imminent arrest) was even recently banned from entering the state of Virginia. Kessler himself tweeted insults about the young woman killed during the rally, then blamed his tweets on a combination of Ambien and Xanax when even his fellow rallygoers disavowed him. And politically, the rally only served to, in the words of the New York Times, empower a leftist political coalition that vows to confront generations of racial and economic injustice in Charlottesville. On a larger scale, as the Atlantics Angela Nagle wrote in December 2017, the violence of Unite the Right put into sharp relief the distinct difference between what the alt-right purported itself to be (people posting fun memes mocking so-called political correctness), and what it actually became (a cover for racists and anti-Semites, complete with Nazi insignia and swastikas): The rally brought into the open the movements racist corenot the winking shit-posters and fuzzy-faced geeks wearing obscure-internet-joke T-shirts, but a small army of unapologetic white nationalists. Anyone who flirted with the alt-right now understood what they were pledging allegiance to. … Charlottesville changed everything, [Gavin McInnes, who had previously associated with alt-right elements] said to Boston Herald Radio. I dont advocate the alt-right. I dont advocate their politics. It should be noted, however, that many of the attendees of Unite the Right clearly knew exactly what the point of the event was. For those targeted by the denizens of the alt-right those whose images were photoshopped into Nazi gas chambers and who received harassing tweets and emails for months the alt-right was always a cesspool of hate. But for casual observers, people who arent on Twitter and dont visit Breitbart the platform for the alt-right, in the words of former Breitbart chair and White House strategist Steve Bannon Charlottesville made that reality all too real.

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August 10, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Alt-right  Comments Closed


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