Archive for the ‘ISIS’ Category

US strike in Afghanistan kills senior ISIS commander Abu …

KABUL, Afghanistan — A U.S. strike over the weekend killed a senior Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) commander in eastern Afghanistan, Afghan and U.S. officials said Monday. The strike in Nangarhar province killed Abu Sayeed Orakzai, a senior leader in the extremist group, according to Shah Hussain Martazawi, deputy spokesman for the Afghan presidency. He said the operation showed the government’s “determination to fight terrorism.”

Lt. Col. Martin O’Donnell, a spokesman for U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said American forces launched a counterterrorism strike in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday that targeted a “senior leader of a designated terrorist organization.” He did not provide further details.

“These efforts target the real enemies of Afghanistan, the same enemies who threaten America,” he said.

An ISIS affiliate that emerged in Afghanistan in 2014 has carried out scores of attacks targeting security forces and the country’s Shiite minority. Even with U.S. and NATO support, Afghan security forces have struggled to combat ISIS and the more well-established Taliban.

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August 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS : Summary for Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc – Yahoo Finance

U.S. Markets open in 6 hrs 47 minsPrevious CloseN/AOpenN/ABidN/A x N/AAskN/A x N/ADay’s RangeN/A – N/A52 Week Rangeundefined – undefinedVolumeN/AAvg. VolumeN/AMarket CapN/ABetaN/APE Ratio (TTM)N/AEPS (TTM)N/AEarnings DateN/AForward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)Ex-Dividend DateN/A1y Target EstN/A

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ISIS : Summary for Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc – Yahoo Finance

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ISIS: The State of Terror: Jessica Stern, J. M. Berger …

Jessica Stern and J.M. Bergers new book, ISIS, should be required reading for every politician and policymakerTheir smart, granular analysis is a bracing antidote to both facile dismissals and wild exaggerations.Stern and Berger offer a nuanced and readable account of the ideological and organizational origins of the group. (Washington Post)

By far the most important contribution yet to our understanding of an organization that remains cloaked in mystery and misunderstanding . . . A brisk, readable, and eye-opening account of ISISs past, present, and future. This is a book every American should read. (Reza Aslan, author of No God but god and Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth)

A timely and urgent book that is essential reading for analysts and policy makers alike. In what is already a cornerstone contribution, Stern and Berger offer the kind of cold-blood analysis so desperately needed on the poorly understood phenomenon that is the so-called Islamic state. (John Horgan, author of The Psychology of Terrorism)

The first serious book to analyze the rise of ISIS . . . Stern and Berger write clearly and persuasively and marshal impressive primary research from ISISs prodigious propaganda to help explain how ISIS became the dominant jihadi group today. Its a terrific and important read. (Peter Bergen, author of Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad)

Stern and Berger pull back the curtain to expose facts and myths about the violent Salafi apocalyptic cult calling itself the Islamic State. A must-read. (Mike Walker, former undersecretary and acting secretary of the United States Army)

ISIS emerged in territory occupied by American soldiers, governed by dictatorial regimes, and fought over by sectarian extremists. Stern and Berger provide context for understanding ISISs past and considering how its media model may affect future extremist movements. (Kecia Ali, associate professor religion, Boston University)

A penetrating analysis . . . The book provides important context for an evolving organization and proto-state that is attempting to rewrite the jihadi playbook. (Aaron Zelin, Washington Institute for Near East Policy)

ISIS: The State of Terror is a timely and important history of a movement that now defines the 21st century. (Sam Kiley, Evening Standard (London))

This book should be required reading for every politician and policymaker. (Washington Post)

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ISIS: The State of Terror: Jessica Stern, J. M. Berger …

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ISIS trail of Terror | Is ISIS a Threat to the U.S.? – ABC …

Born from an especially brutal al Qaeda faction, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has grown from relative obscurity in recent years to overshadow its extremist patrons. It now terrorizes large swaths of Syria and Iraq, has become the target of the largest U.S. military operation in Iraq in years and, with the public, cold-blooded execution of multiple Westerners, dominates headlines the world over.Where Did ISIS Come From?While extremist groups are generally amorphous organizations, ISIS can trace its history directly back to the Sunni terrorist organization al Qaeda, specifically the Iraq faction, al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). AQI, led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was responsible for scores of bombings, kidnappings and beheadings in Iraq following the U.S. invasion there. After al-Zarqawi was killed in 2006 by an American airstrike, leadership of the group eventually fell to an experienced Iraqi fighter, Abu Dua, better known as Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who had once been in U.S. custody in Iraq.

AQI was weakened in Iraq in 2007 as a result of what is known as the Sunni Awakening, when a large alliance of Iraqi Sunni tribes, supported by the U.S., fought against the jihadist group. AQI saw an opportunity to regain its power and expand its ranks in the Syrian conflict that started in 2011, moving into Syria from Iraq. By 2013, al-Baghdadi had spread his groups influence back into Iraq and changed the groups name to ISIS, reflecting its greater regional ambitions, according to the U.S. State Department. ISIS, as the group has been identified by ABC News and other news organizations, refers to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Different translations of the Arabic name al-Baghdadi gave his organization have spawned other English-language versions such as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (also ISIS) or the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). It is also known as Daesh, based on an Arabic acronym.

READ: US Says ‘No Reason to Doubt’ Veracity of Video Featuring Shadowy Iraqi Terror Leader

The Iraqi government and much of its military officer corps are mostly made up of Shia Muslims, whereas much of the areas ISIS has retained in Iraq are predominantly Sunni, like ISIS – meaning the Iraqi military forces are often operating in areas where the local population may be more willing to tolerate, or even support ISIS. ISIS has also built relations of convenience with disgruntled local Sunni tribes and ex-Baathists who have felt marginalized and disenfranchised by the government in Baghdad, which has been accused of favoring Shias. ISIS wasnt handed its first major defeat until mid-August 2014 when Kurdish and Iraqi forces, supported by an aggressive U.S. aerial bombing campaign, pushed the terror group off the Mosul Dam, a key piece of infrastructure.

READ: Why Control of a Terrifying Dam in Iraq Is Life or Death for Half Million People

The U.S.-led coalition against ISIS expanded its aggressive bombing campaign against the group into Syria in September 2014 and has bombarded the terror group virtually daily since. In February 2015, the U.S. military said that day by day, ISIS is losing ground in Iraq.

Nicholas Rasmussen, the Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, told Congress in February 2015 some 20,000 foreign fighters from 90 countries had traveled to Syria to join one group or another — 3,400 of those fighters are said to have come from Western nations, including over 150 from the U.S. who have either traveled to the conflict zone, or attempted to do so.

Its very difficult to be precise with these numbers because they come from a variety of sources that vary in quality, Rasmussen said. But the trend lines are clear and concerning.

One of the gunmen in a dual terror attack in Paris in January 2015 claimed that he was part of ISIS, though the other shooters in that attack were linked to an al Qaeda affiliate. Days after the Paris incident, authorities in the U.S. announced they had arrested an Ohio man and ISIS supporter who planned to bomb the U.S. Capitol.

In addition to the so-called self-radicalized ISIS supporters, Western intelligence agencies are concerned about those who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight with ISIS before coming back home.The battlefields in Iraq and Syria provide foreign fighters with combat experience, weapons and explosives training, and access to terrorist networks that may be planning attacks which target the West, Rasmussen said in February 2015.

READ: How US Military Team Slipped On and Off Mt. Sinjar

In a particularly disturbing development, a pamphlet attributed to ISIS and shared online described the rules of dealing with female unbelievers as slaves. The rules allowed for forced intercourse, for instance, except in certain circumstances.

After Foleys disappearance, his family, U.S. officials and other reporters kept the kidnapping a secret until January 2013 when Foleys family decided to break their silence and beg for their sons return.Foleys captors, whoever they were, hadnt made contact, the family said. The U.S. government increased its effort to find Foley, using unlikely messengers including the Turks, the Czechs and the Russians to get word to potential abductors on either side of the Syrian conflict. In November 2013 a ransom demand for an astronomical sum of money — $132 million — was received, according to GlobalPost CEO Phil Balboni, but it wasn’t taken seriously. Efforts continued to free Foley, including a secret, failed U.S. military rescue mission in the summer of 2014. But following U.S. airstrikes on ISIS in August, Foley was killed on camera by a self-professed member of the terror group.

READ: Could Money Have Saved James Foley? ISIS ‘Wasn’t Serious’ About Demands, Officials Say

Sotloff was a freelance reporter whose work on the Middle East appeared in TIME and Foreign Policy among others. He disappeared in Syria in August 2013. After Foleys execution video appeared online, Sotloffs mother, Shirley, made a videotaped plea to ISIS leader al-Baghdadi to have mercy on her son.

At the end of the video that appeared to show Sotloffs death, the militant in black stands beside another kneeling hostage, identified as a British citizen.

We take this opportunity to warn those governments that enter this evil alliance of America against the Islamic State [ISIS] to back off and leave our people alone, he says.Once again, the airstrikes continued and other Western hostages were killed on camera in similarly gruesome fashion.

ISISs last known American hostage, 26-year-old Kayla Mueller, died in the hands of the terror group, the White House said in February 2015, though its unclear how she died.Mueller had traveled the world as an aid worker before her death, going wherever she thought she could help those in desperate need.For as long as I live, I will not let this suffering be normal, she told her local newspaper in 2013. [I will not let this be] something we just accept It is important to stop and realize what we have, why we have it and how privileged we are. And from that place, start caring and get a lot done.

[Last updated: Feb. 23, 2015]

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ISIS: The first terror group to build an Islamic state? – CNN

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The face of a balding, middle-aged man stares unsmilingly into the camera. He is dressed in a suit and tie and could pass for a midlevel bureaucrat.

But the photograph is that of Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, who has transformed a few terror cells harried to the verge of extinction into the most dangerous militant group in the world.

The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria has thrived and mutated during the ongoing civil war in Syria and in the security vacuum that followed the departure of the last American forces from Iraq.

The aim of ISIS is to create an Islamic state across Sunni areas of Iraq and in Syria.

With the seizure of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, and advances on others, that aim appears within reach.

ISIS controls hundreds of square miles where state authority has evaporated. It ignores international borders and has a presence all the way from Syria’s Mediterranean coast to south of Baghdad.

What are its origins?

In 2006, al Qaeda in Iraq — under the ruthless leadership of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi — embarked on seemingly arbitrary and brutal treatment of civilians as it tried to ignite a sectarian war against the majority Shia community.

It came close to succeeding, especially after the bombing of the Al-Askariya Mosque, an important Shia shrine in Samarra, which sparked retaliatory attacks.

But the killing of al-Zarqawi by American forces, the vicious treatment of civilians and the emergence of the Sahwa (Awakening) Fronts under moderate Sunni tribal leaders nearly destroyed the group.

Nearly, but not quite.

When U.S. forces left Iraq, they took much of their intelligence-gathering expertise with them.

Iraqi officials began to speak of a “third generation” of al Qaeda in Iraq.

The capability of those Iraqi forces was fatally compromised by a lack of professional soldiers, the division of military units along sectarian lines and a lack of the equipment needed for fighting an insurgency, such as attack helicopters and reconnaissance capabilities.

The new al Qaeda was rebranded in 2006 as the Islamic State in Iraq (ISI). It would add “and Syria” to its name later.

The group exploited a growing perception among many Sunnis that they were being persecuted by the Shia-dominated government led by Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, starved of resources and excluded from a share of power.

The arrest of senior Sunni political figures and heavy-handed suppression of Sunni dissent were the best recruiting sergeants ISI could have. And it helped the new leader re-establish the group’s influence.

Who is its master of terror?

Abu Bakr al Baghdadi graduated to the top job in 2010 — at the age of 39 — after Abu Omar al Baghdadi was killed in a joint U.S.-Iraqi operation.

Al Baghdadi’s group was in a pitiful state. But with U.S. forces and intelligence on the way out, he launched a revival.

Very little is known about Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, but a biography posted on jihadist websites last year said he held a Ph.D. in Islamic studies from a university in the capital.

He formed his own militant group in the Samarra and Diyala areas, where his family was from, before joining al Qaeda in Iraq.

Al Baghdadi even served four years in a U.S. prison camp for insurgents, at Bucca in southern Iraq — a time in which he almost certainly developed a network of contacts and honed his ideology.

He was released in 2009 and went to work.

What is ISIS trying to accomplish?

It wants to establish an Islamic caliphate, or state, stretching across the region.

ISIS has begun imposing Sharia law in the towns it controls. Boys and girls must be separated at school; women must wear the niqab or full veil in public. Sharia courts often dispense brutal justice, music is banned and the fast is enforced during Ramadan.

Sharia law covers both religious and non-religious aspects of life.

Where does the group’s money come from?

In the beginning, al Baghdadi focused on secrecy — with loosely connected cells making it more difficult to hunt down the leadership — and on money.

Extortion, such as demanding money from truck drivers and threatening to blow up businesses, was one revenue stream; robbing banks and gold shops was another.

It seemed the group had become little more than gangsters, but the income would help finance a growing stream of suicide attacks and assassinations that would poison the political atmosphere.

It would also aid the recruitment of Sunni tribal fighters and finance spectacular prison raids that liberated hundreds of fighters, as well as attacks on police patrols and the assassination of officials.

Now, al Baghdadi has a new strategy for generating resources: large-scale attacks aimed at capturing and holding territory.

Ayham Kamel of the Eurasia Group, a U.S.-based consultancy, says that in the latest iteration of this strategy, ISIS will “use cash reserves from Mosul’s banks, military equipment from seized military and police bases and the release of 2,500 fighters from local jails to bolster its military and financial capability.”

What’s been its key to survival?

Al Baghdadi avoided al-Zarqawi’s mistakes by avoiding the alienation of powerful tribal figures.

When it captured Falluja, west of Baghdad, in January, it worked with local tribal leaders rather than raise its black flag over the city.

One of the group’s ideologues, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, even admitted: “As for our mistakes, we do not deny them. Rather, we will continue to make mistakes as long as we are humans. God forbid that we commit mistakes deliberately.”

How is it drawing support?

ISIS is, in essence, trying to capture and channel the resentment of the Sunni street. And in both Syria and Iraq, it is trying to win favor through dawa — organizing social welfare programs and even recreational activities for children, distributing food and fuel to the needy, and setting up clinics.

Again, having the money matters. The price it demands is enforcement of the strict Sharia code.

How does Syria fit into the picture?

A senior U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN this week that ISIS looks at Syria and Iraq as “one interchangeable battlefield and its ability to shift resources and personnel across the border has measurably strengthened its position in both theaters.”

The explosion of violence in Syria was a gift to al Baghdadi.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad lost control over large parts of the North and the long border with Iraq.

The group, still known as ISI at the time, could build a rear base where it could recruit foreign fighters, organize and escape from any Iraqi army operations.

Al Baghdadi may have sent operatives across the border as early as the autumn of 2011, and the group later changed its name — adding “al Sham” for Syria.

It moved swiftly to take control of the Syrian province of Raqqa, aided by the al-Assad regime’s focus on Homs and Aleppo.

What is its relationship with other al Qaeda groups?

As it has grown in strength, the group’s vision of a caliphate under its control has expanded.

Its ambition extended to declaring early in 2013 that it was absorbing another militant group in Syria, the al-Nusra Front. According to some accounts, al Baghdadi had been instrumental in creating the group; now he wanted its obedience.

The declaration — and al-Nusra’s rejection of it — set off a rare public clash between two groups that both saw themselves as part of al Qaeda.

From his hideout somewhere in Afghanistan or Pakistan, al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri at first tried to mediate between the two, and then disowned ISIS when it refused to concentrate on Iraq.

Rather than seek reconciliation, ISIS has hit back. Earlier this year, the group’s spokesman, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, told al-Zawahiri in a recording: “Sheikh Osama (bin Laden) gathered all the mujahideen with one word, but you divided them and tore them apart.”

“You make the mujahideen sad, and make the enemy of the mujahideen gloat because you support the traitor, and you make the heart bleed,” he said — referring to the leader of the al-Nusra Front, Abu Mohammed al-Jolani.

It was another sign of the extraordinary confidence of the ISIS leadership.

Despite the rift, ISIS’ success against what are seen by militant Sunnis as loathsome Shia regimes in Syria and Iraq has attracted thousands of foreign fighters to its ranks, enabling it to continue battling al-Nusra in Syria while preparing for its big offensive in Iraq.

What is its strategy?

For Western counterterrorism agencies, the combination of fanaticism and disciplined organization is the nightmare scenario. ISIS has plenty of both.

While the world was shocked by its sudden capture of the city of Falluja, ISIS was still focused on a bigger prize: Mosul and the province of Nineveh. Operations in Falluja and elsewhere in the western province of Anbar were meant to (and did) draw Iraqi forces away from the north.

It has developed an ability to conduct operations — from suicide bombings and attacks on the security forces to wresting control of towns — in several regions at once, keeping the demoralized Iraqi army off balance.

And battle experience has created a resilient force capable of ever more sophisticated attacks.

In raids on Samarra, for example, its fighters used bulldozers to remove barriers that had been in place since the U.S. occupation.

Some analysts expect critical parts of the Iraqi oil infrastructure around Mosul to be among its future targets.

Where does its weakness lie?

ISIS runs the risk that its rapid expansion — and threat to the Iraqi state — will overstretch the group.

In northern Syria, it has retreated from some towns it held after clashes with al-Nusra and other groups.

Al-Nusra is making common cause with other groups in an anti-ISIS front.

And by taking Mosul, which Iraq’s Kurds see as in their sphere of interest, ISIS may invite greater cooperation between the Iraqi army and experienced Kurdish fighters.

A U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN that ISIS “still has significant weaknesses. It has shown little ability to govern effectively, is generally unpopular, and has no sway outside the Sunni community in either Iraq or Syria.”

To many analysts, that smacks of complacency.

How significant is its threat?

The weakness of the governments ISIS is confronting — and the hatred for those governments among Sunnis — means that a few dozen truckloads of fighters can seize towns and cities, overcoming forces many times larger by their sheer ferocity and battle experience.

In the words of the Soufan Group, a political risk consultancy, “ISIS has become indisputably the most effective and ruthless terrorist organization in the world.”

“It now challenges the authority of two of the largest states in the Middle East, and has attracted significant numbers of fighters, not just from Iraq and Syria, but also from Saudi Arabia and other Arab states including Jordan.”

There is no doubting the group’s confidence and ambition.

ISIS spokesman al-Adnani took to Twitter Wednesday to declare, “The battle is not yet raging it, but it will rage in Baghdad and Karbala. Put on your belts and get ready,” according to a translation by the SITE Intelligence Group.

Al-Adnani openly mocked al-Maliki as an underwear salesman who had lost Iraq for the Shia.

“You lost a historic opportunity for your people to control Iraq,” he said, “and the Shi’ites will always curse you for as long as they live.”

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ISIS: The first terror group to build an Islamic state? – CNN

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July 13, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Fast Facts – CNN

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Listen to the story of a survivor.”},{“title”:”Iraq forces and ISIS exchange gunfire”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/161017163221-nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig-00004713-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh got caught up in gunfire between Iraq forces and ISIS outside of Mosul.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh got caught up in gunfire between Iraq forces and ISIS outside of Mosul.”},{“title”:”Majority of ISIS victims are Muslim”,”duration”:”01:24″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160714185630-iraqi-women-mourn-suicide-bombing-baghdad-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Despite ISIS frequent calls for attacks in Europe and the United States, its biggest victims, often forgotten, are Muslims living outside Western countries.”,”descriptionText”:”Despite ISIS frequent calls for attacks in Europe and the United States, its biggest victims, often forgotten, are Muslims living outside Western countries.”},{“title”:”Is it ISIS, ISIL or Daesh?”,”duration”:”01:23″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/151127115516-isis-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Many call it ISIS, Barack Obama refers to it as ISIL, while for others it’s Daesh. What should we call this terror group?”,”descriptionText”:”Many call it ISIS, Barack Obama refers to it as ISIL, while for others it’s Daesh. What should we call this terror group?”},{“title”:”ISIS’ battle tactics”,”duration”:”02:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160822185438-isis-war-tactics-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”From burning oil to impair the visibility of coalition aircraft and drones, to underground tunnels and home-made weapons, CNN’s Arwa Damon explains ISIS’ latest battle tactics in Iraq.”,”descriptionText”:”From burning oil to impair the visibility of coalition aircraft and drones, to underground tunnels and home-made weapons, CNN’s Arwa Damon explains ISIS’ latest battle tactics in Iraq.”},{“title”:”Why Libya matters to ISIS”,”duration”:”00:46″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160219084702-isis-fighters-in-libya-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-paton-walsh”>Nick Paton Walshu003c/a> explains why ISIS is beginning to move its forces from Iraq and Syria to Libya.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-paton-walsh”>Nick Paton Walshu003c/a> explains why ISIS is beginning to move its forces from Iraq and Syria to Libya.”},{“title”:”ISIS hates this religious group the most”,”duration”:”01:57″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/151019140613-isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm-00000923-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”ISIS targets one specific religious community the most. CNN’s Ivan Watson explains who they are and why ISIS hates them. “,”descriptionText”:”ISIS targets one specific religious community the most. CNN’s Ivan Watson explains who they are and why ISIS hates them. “},{“title”:”Iraqis recount horrors of being human shields for ISIS”,”duration”:”02:44″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160407043606-iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg-00013513-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”In a CNN exclusive, Arwa Damon meets Iraqis who were held by ISIS and used as human shields.”,”descriptionText”:”In a CNN exclusive, Arwa Damon meets Iraqis who were held by ISIS and used as human shields.”},{“title”:”ISIS calls on Saudi supporters to kill relatives”,”duration”:”02:43″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160421002234-isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg-00002526-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Saudi Arabia is confronting a deadly campaign by ISIS to overthrow the monarchy. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nic-robertson”>Nic Robertsonu003c/a> reports the militants are calling on their supporters to target family members who work in security forces.”,”descriptionText”:”Saudi Arabia is confronting a deadly campaign by ISIS to overthrow the monarchy. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nic-robertson”>Nic Robertsonu003c/a> reports the militants are calling on their supporters to target family members who work in security forces.”},{“title”:”Why is ISIS heading to Libya?”,”duration”:”02:30″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160420175729-isis-in-libya-1-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”ISIS is under a lot of pressure in Syria and in Iraq and is now heading to Libya. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen explains why new ISIS recruits are seeing Libya as an easier place to join insurgency. “,”descriptionText”:”ISIS is under a lot of pressure in Syria and in Iraq and is now heading to Libya. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen explains why new ISIS recruits are seeing Libya as an easier place to join insurgency. “},{“title”:”Iraqi town suffering from ISIS chemical attack”,”duration”:”02:34″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160418194917-iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today-00010115-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s Arwa Damon reports on the use of chemical weapons in Iraq by ISIS and the devastation in one Iraqi town.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s Arwa Damon reports on the use of chemical weapons in Iraq by ISIS and the devastation in one Iraqi town.”}],’js-video_headline-featured-15zr83h’,”,”js-video_source-featured-15zr83h”,true,true,’isis-power-an-terror’);if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length

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ISIS Fast Facts – CNN

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ISIS Is Not a Terrorist Group | Foreign Affairs

After 9/11, many within the U.S. national security establishment worried that, following decades of preparation for confronting conventional enemies, Washington was unready for the challenge posed by an unconventional adversary such as al Qaeda. So over the next decade, the United States built an elaborate bureaucratic structure to fight the jihadist organization, adapting its military and its intelligence and law enforcement agencies to the tasks of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency.

Now, however, a different group, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), which also calls itself the Islamic State, has supplanted al Qaeda as the jihadist threat of greatest concern. ISIS ideology, rhetoric, and long-term goals are similar to al Qaedas, and the two groups were once formally allied. So many observers assume that the current challenge is simply to refocus Washingtons now-formidable counterterrorism apparatus on a new target.

But ISIS is not al Qaeda. It is not an outgrowth or a part of the older radical Islamist organization, nor does it represent the next phase in its evolution. Although al Qaeda remains dangerousespecially its affiliates in North Africa and YemenISIS is its successor. ISIS represents the postal Qaeda jihadist threat.

In a nationally televised speech last September explaining his plan to degrade and ultimately destroy ISIS, U.S. President Barack Obama drew a straight line between the group and al Qaeda and claimed that ISIS is a terrorist organization, pure and simple. This was mistaken; ISIS hardly fits that description, and indeed, although it uses terrorism as a tactic, it is not really a terrorist organization at all. Terrorist networks, such as al Qaeda, generally have only dozens or hundreds of members, attack civilians, do not hold territory, and cannot directly confront military forces. ISIS, on the other hand, boasts some 30,000 fighters, holds territory in both Iraq and Syria, maintains extensive military capabilities, controls lines of communication, commands infrastructure, funds itself, and engages in sophisticated military operations. If ISIS is purely and simply anything, it

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Hunting ISIS: History Series to Follow American Voluteer …

by Jessica Pena, May 7, 2018

History is on the hunt. Recently, the network announced their new TV show,Hunting ISIS, will premiere later this month.

The docuseries follows a group of veteran and civilian volunteers who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight against ISIS alongside local militias.

Hunting ISISpremieres on History onMay 29th at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

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May 2, 2018 New York HISTORY follows a group of veteran and civilian volunteers who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight against ISIS alongside local militias in the original documentary series, Hunting ISIS. The 6-episode series premieres on Tuesday, May 29 at 10pm ET/PT. Following its broadcast on HISTORY, the series will air on VICELAND on Sunday, June 3 at 10pm ET/PT. Hunting ISIS, a co-production of HISTORY and VICELAND, is produced by Delirio Films and directed by Sebastiano Tomada. John Battsek (Restrepo, Searching for Sugarman) serves as Executive Producer alongside Delirios Rafael Marmor and Christopher Leggett.

The terrorist organization known as ISIS emerged as a menace in the Middle East years before most in the West took notice of their attacks abroad. More brutal than Al Qaeda before them, ISIS took advantage of chaos caused by Syrias still-raging Civil War and the United States withdrawal from Iraq to recruit heavily in the region. In 2014, the world watched as they swept across Iraq and Syria, capturing wide territories and ruthlessly killing or enslaving anyone who showed signs of resistance as they declared themselves the Islamic State. Local forces backed by a U.S.-led coalition of western military powers began fighting back, but progress has taken years.

Not content to sit back and watch ISIS devastate the Middle East from afar, scores of western volunteers have since traveled to region to join the fight against the terrorist group. Through the eyes of American fighters embedded with the Kurdish YPG militia in Syria, and medics supporting a coalition of local forces in Iraq, Hunting ISIS follows these men as they begin the difficult push to retake ISIS capital cities.

Completely unpaid and unsupported by their governments, western volunteers have many reasons for joining the fight. Some are military veterans craving the familiar adrenaline rush and brotherhood of combat, who shoulder a sense of unfinished business in the Middle East. Some are civilians eager to test their mettle while searching for a greater purpose. All are united in their determination to defend the innocent and end the atrocities being committed by ISIS. With unprecedented access, this documentary series witnesses their unique role in one of the defining conflicts of our time, exploring whats driving these men to war.

Filmmaker and award-winning photographer Sebastiano Tomada built his career documenting conflict in some of the worlds most volatile warzones. Hunting ISIS is the culmination of over two years embedded in the trenches in Iraq and Syria, granting visceral, intimate access to the front lines of the war against ISIS and those individuals who give up everything to fight it.

Hunting ISIS is produced by Delirio Films for HISTORY. Rafael Marmor and Christopher Leggett are Executive Producers for Delirio. Melinda Toporoff is Executive Producer for HISTORY. Gena Konstantinakos and Patrick Moses are Executive Producers for VICELAND.

A+E Networks holds worldwide distribution rights for the series.

What do you think? Do you watch History? Will you check outHunting ISIS?

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ISIS IS True Islam | Walid Shoebat

By Walid Shoebat (Shoebat Exclusive) Reading the papersis reading authors of confusion. They say Saudi top cleric blasts al-Qaida and ISIS as enemy No. 1 of Islam in a statement issued in Riyadh.

The ideas of extremism, radicalism and terrorism have nothing to do with Islam and (their proponents) are the enemy number one of Islam, the kingdoms top cleric said.

He cited jihadists from the Islamic State, which has declared a caliphate straddling parts of Iraq and Syria, and the global al-Qaida terror network. Really? ISIS and al-Qaida do not represent Islam? ISIS IS ISlam and ISlam is ISIS.

Muslims frequently say that we, the critics of Islam know nothing about Islam. They relentlessly exhaust us with this statement that ISIS terrorists do not understand true Islam.

I finally capitulate.

They are correct. The truth is that no one truly understands true Islam, neither Muslim scholars nor Muslims in general. Even the best of its secular critics dont understand it.The only way to fully understand Islam is to be the devil himself.

Not even Caliph Al-Baghdadi, the head of the ISIS understands true Islam for he is unaware that he worships the devil in disguise as God. We sit around calling ourselves experts and we argue over Jihad and its many meanings. Than we talk about stealth Jihad and creeping Sharia. Than we talk about how to reform Islam, so we elevate well-dressed groomed Muslims to promote this new form of reformed Islam.

The Muslim world looks at us and laughs saying that we still do not understand true Islam regardless that if we point the finger at the extremists or the moderates. Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the most prominent Sunni Muslim scholar (for sure he should understand true Islam) looks at us mockingly saying:

They speak not of the one Islam as revealed by Allah but of manufactured Islams, plural, several different Islams, which they desire to create. Sometimes they even divide Islam by regions. There is the Asian variety of Islam; then we have the African Islam. Sometimes, according to the ages, there is the Prophets era of Islam, Rashidi Islam, Umayyad Islam, Abbasid Islam, Ottoman Islam and modern Islam. Sometimes, according to race, there is Arab Islam, Indian Islam, Turkish Islam, and the Islam of the Malaysian And so on and so forth. Sometimes, according to the doctrine, there is Sunni Islam and Shiite Islam. They even divide the Sunni and the Shia into divisions. New divisions have also been created; there is revolutionary Islam, reactionary Islam, radical Islam, classical Islam, right-wing Islam, leftist Islam, orthodox Islam, modern Islam and, finally, political Islam, spiritual Islam and theological Islam. Why do they invent such divisions that are rejected in Islam? The truth is that these divisions are all unacceptable in the eyes of a Muslim; there is only one Islam, which has no partners, which recognizes no other; it is the first Islam, the Islam of the Quran and Sunnah. (Accusing Islam with Politics by Dr. Yusuf Qaradawi, 10/28/2011)8

Indeed, even Qaradawi who himself does not understand Islam had this one right; there is only one true Islam. What he iswrong about is that Islam is not from God but is of the devil. Period.

And since no human fully understands the devil, they have it wrong; they do not understand Islam. No Muslim understands Islam. To understand Islam, we all, rich and poor, lame and mute, grew up taking a copy of that green colored book; its cover was illuminated in beautiful Arabic gold script.

We were made to read it while we reclined our backs on stone hewn columns surmounted by decorated arches. We mesmerized our inner souls hearing ourselves reciting incomprehensible abstract thoughts and fragmented verses while bobbing our heads sitting under melancholy domed shrines that hovered over these beautiful specimens of Persian rugs donated courtesy of wealthy Arab princes.

It was rather a peculiar hodgepodge they all said was divine. For over millennia it was a bestseller in the east and still is. Everyone had external reverence that at any moment when they heard the recitation in the ancient classical Arabic tongue they become hypnotized by some external force, humbling themselves, ready to carry out sacred instructions to kill infidels as if under a spell from the Master Hypnotist.

No giant would even dare call this book a fiction, in respect to its avid readers who believed it was sent to them from the seventh heavendictaphoned by a colorful angel of lightto a humble illiterate servant of God. My life journey to understanding Islam was filled with thorns and obstacles, which I finally managed to pluck out of my wandering soul. The prickling thorns were thrust to my side by what was left behind from the writ of a sojourner named Muhammad who once alleged that a bright angel of light once visited him while he frequented a mysterious cave called Ghar Hira in Arabia.

There he was dictaphonedso he claimedthe word of a god named Maliki-Rab-ul-Alameen, The King-Lord of The Worlds who was the god of this world and the god of the underworld. The sojourner who claimed to be prophet then desired to ascend to heaven, to the most high. So he alleged that one night that he was transported in a twinkling of an eye far away up to the heavens riding on the back of another being, a hybrid of a winged steed, part woman, part peacock he called Buraq.

But the time I only began to understand something about Islam was the day I opened a Bible when I still was Muslim in 1993. I ineluctably began to turn its pages. As it turned out it spoke of such stories of this Buraq already mentioned in the Quran even foretelling that story a millennium before of a rebellious beautiful bright angel of light, with every precious stone was your covering: the ruby, the topaz, and the diamond; the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper; the lapis lazuli, the turquoise, and the emerald; and the gold, the workmanship of your setting and sockets was in you *(Ezekiel 28:13)* He than arose to be the worlds leadingheresiarch, an Antichrist who denies Father and Son (1 John 2:22) and claimed in his Al-Isra Wal-Miraj to have ascended to heaven (Isaiah 14:13) reaching the seventh heaven claiming, as it says in Isaiah 14:13, You said in your heart, I will ascend to heaven; above the stars of God claiming to meet God who ordered him to rule over all of mankind, angels and the whole multitudes of demons.

Then I read Gods oracles concerning the Desert which God called Babylon, Dumah, Kedar and even Arabia with a proclamation that said: Babylon is fallen, is fallen, (Isaiah 21:9, Revelation 18:1-2) These were all in the land of the sojourner, the man with the Buraq steed and are where the city of that virgin bride cloaked in black silk, decked with silver and gold.

And for my predilection to read this book (the Bible) over the other (Quran), the giants said that they would sever my head as they severed the heads of thousand thousands before me. Yet even this peril was foretold in the book, which they forbade us to read. Then, and way later, when I dared to speak negatively of it, the media giants who even knew the book was hypnotic fiction, were grieved and alleged that I knew little about the sacred text. Publishers avoided me fearing the frenzy of the mobs, the same mobs that converged like a river once a year swirling roundabout the idol they had erected long ago in the midst of this Babel telling me that Islam was peaceful.

Was Islam peaceful when Omar bin Al-Khattab began to advance into Christian Byzantine territory? Was Islam peaceful and did not behave as ISIS did when Muslims during the decisive Battle of Yarmouk in August 636 when the Christian Emperor Heraclius was defeated by Islamic hordes?

Was Islam not behaving like ISIS when Sophronius, the Christian Arab from Bethlehem who was at the time Patriarch of Jerusalem, how in his sermon on the Day of the Epiphany 636 A.D. he bewailed the destruction of the churches and monasteries, how the sacked towns, the fields laid waste, the villages burned down by the Muslim nomads who were overrunning the country then to later invade Jerusalem itself and occupy it under Umar bin Al-Khattab.

Was Saudi Arabia and Qatar not acting like ISIS when they send incursions into Syria of replicas of the same ancient savages, beheading Christians, raping, burning and destroying everything in sight; the American Christian initially was unaware, despite our warnings, that he would take the side of such savages in full support of the so-called Free Syrian Army, Muslims from different nations whom converged into Syria to carry out the Harlots interest of Saudi Arabia.

The American have not learned the lessons from history about what Arabia has done to the Christian world beginning in the conquest of Christian Syria in 637, the conquest of Christian Armenia, 639, to later massacre 1.2 Million Armenian Christians in 1915.

Have we seen any difference between the Islam of ISIS and the Islam of the Ottomans?

And then we had the conquest of Christian Egypt in 639 A.D., in which the population of the Christian Copts gradually decreased from nine million to 700,000 at the early 1900s.

And Egypt is an important case-in-point regarding peaceful Islam. It is a fact of history that the Egyptians allowed the Muslims into their country. When the Egyptian populace heard that the Muslims were arriving, they accepted them with open arms, not seeing them as deceiving heretics, but as people who merely believed in the one true God. Their open mindedness would have received the applause of the moderns, but the end result was the consequence of all ultra equality and tolerance: violence. For decades I roamed the world of cowards, politicians, media giants and even conservatives who claimed to believe in the purists of truths to only find out they were riddled with the ignorance that was born out of their inner fears. They too would not dare call the devil devil. But I stood and confronted the wizards; these goliaths that carried swords in one hand and that book of fictions they used for shield in the other telling them that their victories with the sword will be until all bow towards their image, but as long as there are a few who choose their scimitar blade over prostrating in submission to tyranny, that victory is for the slain who refuse to bow to their devil.

The Bible proclaimed warnings to the nave multitudes foretelling even these giants, the ones with the scimitars, coming to the city gates proclaiming that Islam is peace peace peace. For decades, I began to shout from the rooftops. The giants are coming With Trojan horses they come to the city gates they bring charmers, wizards and star gazers they deceive by peace to only find out that I am but a lone voice crying in the wilderness; a watchman on walls sounding a trumpet to nave western multitudes dazzled by charmers and the stargazers whose outcry of hes a liar an impostor an ant who never saw giants there are no Trojan horses at the city gates while the naive slander with a sharp tongue saying that my declarations were fiction, that I need to be brought down from the city walls and sent into banishment.

So they sent the giants to bring me down, but their efforts were all in vain. In this hear the sound of my trumpet, hear not and your blood is on your hands.

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US strike in Afghanistan kills senior ISIS commander Abu …

KABUL, Afghanistan — A U.S. strike over the weekend killed a senior Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) commander in eastern Afghanistan, Afghan and U.S. officials said Monday. The strike in Nangarhar province killed Abu Sayeed Orakzai, a senior leader in the extremist group, according to Shah Hussain Martazawi, deputy spokesman for the Afghan presidency. He said the operation showed the government’s “determination to fight terrorism.” Lt. Col. Martin O’Donnell, a spokesman for U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said American forces launched a counterterrorism strike in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday that targeted a “senior leader of a designated terrorist organization.” He did not provide further details. “These efforts target the real enemies of Afghanistan, the same enemies who threaten America,” he said. An ISIS affiliate that emerged in Afghanistan in 2014 has carried out scores of attacks targeting security forces and the country’s Shiite minority. Even with U.S. and NATO support, Afghan security forces have struggled to combat ISIS and the more well-established Taliban. 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ISIS : Summary for Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc – Yahoo Finance

U.S. Markets open in 6 hrs 47 minsPrevious CloseN/AOpenN/ABidN/A x N/AAskN/A x N/ADay’s RangeN/A – N/A52 Week Rangeundefined – undefinedVolumeN/AAvg. VolumeN/AMarket CapN/ABetaN/APE Ratio (TTM)N/AEPS (TTM)N/AEarnings DateN/AForward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)Ex-Dividend DateN/A1y Target EstN/A

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August 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS: The State of Terror: Jessica Stern, J. M. Berger …

Jessica Stern and J.M. Bergers new book, ISIS, should be required reading for every politician and policymakerTheir smart, granular analysis is a bracing antidote to both facile dismissals and wild exaggerations.Stern and Berger offer a nuanced and readable account of the ideological and organizational origins of the group. (Washington Post) By far the most important contribution yet to our understanding of an organization that remains cloaked in mystery and misunderstanding . . . A brisk, readable, and eye-opening account of ISISs past, present, and future. This is a book every American should read. (Reza Aslan, author of No God but god and Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth) A timely and urgent book that is essential reading for analysts and policy makers alike. In what is already a cornerstone contribution, Stern and Berger offer the kind of cold-blood analysis so desperately needed on the poorly understood phenomenon that is the so-called Islamic state. (John Horgan, author of The Psychology of Terrorism) The first serious book to analyze the rise of ISIS . . . Stern and Berger write clearly and persuasively and marshal impressive primary research from ISISs prodigious propaganda to help explain how ISIS became the dominant jihadi group today. Its a terrific and important read. (Peter Bergen, author of Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad) Stern and Berger pull back the curtain to expose facts and myths about the violent Salafi apocalyptic cult calling itself the Islamic State. A must-read. (Mike Walker, former undersecretary and acting secretary of the United States Army) ISIS emerged in territory occupied by American soldiers, governed by dictatorial regimes, and fought over by sectarian extremists. Stern and Berger provide context for understanding ISISs past and considering how its media model may affect future extremist movements. (Kecia Ali, associate professor religion, Boston University) A penetrating analysis . . . The book provides important context for an evolving organization and proto-state that is attempting to rewrite the jihadi playbook. (Aaron Zelin, Washington Institute for Near East Policy) ISIS: The State of Terror is a timely and important history of a movement that now defines the 21st century. (Sam Kiley, Evening Standard (London)) This book should be required reading for every politician and policymaker. (Washington Post)

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August 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS trail of Terror | Is ISIS a Threat to the U.S.? – ABC …

Born from an especially brutal al Qaeda faction, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has grown from relative obscurity in recent years to overshadow its extremist patrons. It now terrorizes large swaths of Syria and Iraq, has become the target of the largest U.S. military operation in Iraq in years and, with the public, cold-blooded execution of multiple Westerners, dominates headlines the world over.Where Did ISIS Come From?While extremist groups are generally amorphous organizations, ISIS can trace its history directly back to the Sunni terrorist organization al Qaeda, specifically the Iraq faction, al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). AQI, led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was responsible for scores of bombings, kidnappings and beheadings in Iraq following the U.S. invasion there. After al-Zarqawi was killed in 2006 by an American airstrike, leadership of the group eventually fell to an experienced Iraqi fighter, Abu Dua, better known as Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who had once been in U.S. custody in Iraq. AQI was weakened in Iraq in 2007 as a result of what is known as the Sunni Awakening, when a large alliance of Iraqi Sunni tribes, supported by the U.S., fought against the jihadist group. AQI saw an opportunity to regain its power and expand its ranks in the Syrian conflict that started in 2011, moving into Syria from Iraq. By 2013, al-Baghdadi had spread his groups influence back into Iraq and changed the groups name to ISIS, reflecting its greater regional ambitions, according to the U.S. State Department. ISIS, as the group has been identified by ABC News and other news organizations, refers to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Different translations of the Arabic name al-Baghdadi gave his organization have spawned other English-language versions such as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (also ISIS) or the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). It is also known as Daesh, based on an Arabic acronym. READ: US Says ‘No Reason to Doubt’ Veracity of Video Featuring Shadowy Iraqi Terror Leader The Iraqi government and much of its military officer corps are mostly made up of Shia Muslims, whereas much of the areas ISIS has retained in Iraq are predominantly Sunni, like ISIS – meaning the Iraqi military forces are often operating in areas where the local population may be more willing to tolerate, or even support ISIS. ISIS has also built relations of convenience with disgruntled local Sunni tribes and ex-Baathists who have felt marginalized and disenfranchised by the government in Baghdad, which has been accused of favoring Shias. ISIS wasnt handed its first major defeat until mid-August 2014 when Kurdish and Iraqi forces, supported by an aggressive U.S. aerial bombing campaign, pushed the terror group off the Mosul Dam, a key piece of infrastructure. READ: Why Control of a Terrifying Dam in Iraq Is Life or Death for Half Million People The U.S.-led coalition against ISIS expanded its aggressive bombing campaign against the group into Syria in September 2014 and has bombarded the terror group virtually daily since. In February 2015, the U.S. military said that day by day, ISIS is losing ground in Iraq. Nicholas Rasmussen, the Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, told Congress in February 2015 some 20,000 foreign fighters from 90 countries had traveled to Syria to join one group or another — 3,400 of those fighters are said to have come from Western nations, including over 150 from the U.S. who have either traveled to the conflict zone, or attempted to do so. Its very difficult to be precise with these numbers because they come from a variety of sources that vary in quality, Rasmussen said. But the trend lines are clear and concerning. One of the gunmen in a dual terror attack in Paris in January 2015 claimed that he was part of ISIS, though the other shooters in that attack were linked to an al Qaeda affiliate. Days after the Paris incident, authorities in the U.S. announced they had arrested an Ohio man and ISIS supporter who planned to bomb the U.S. Capitol. In addition to the so-called self-radicalized ISIS supporters, Western intelligence agencies are concerned about those who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight with ISIS before coming back home.The battlefields in Iraq and Syria provide foreign fighters with combat experience, weapons and explosives training, and access to terrorist networks that may be planning attacks which target the West, Rasmussen said in February 2015. READ: How US Military Team Slipped On and Off Mt. Sinjar In a particularly disturbing development, a pamphlet attributed to ISIS and shared online described the rules of dealing with female unbelievers as slaves. The rules allowed for forced intercourse, for instance, except in certain circumstances. After Foleys disappearance, his family, U.S. officials and other reporters kept the kidnapping a secret until January 2013 when Foleys family decided to break their silence and beg for their sons return.Foleys captors, whoever they were, hadnt made contact, the family said. The U.S. government increased its effort to find Foley, using unlikely messengers including the Turks, the Czechs and the Russians to get word to potential abductors on either side of the Syrian conflict. In November 2013 a ransom demand for an astronomical sum of money — $132 million — was received, according to GlobalPost CEO Phil Balboni, but it wasn’t taken seriously. Efforts continued to free Foley, including a secret, failed U.S. military rescue mission in the summer of 2014. But following U.S. airstrikes on ISIS in August, Foley was killed on camera by a self-professed member of the terror group. READ: Could Money Have Saved James Foley? ISIS ‘Wasn’t Serious’ About Demands, Officials Say Sotloff was a freelance reporter whose work on the Middle East appeared in TIME and Foreign Policy among others. He disappeared in Syria in August 2013. After Foleys execution video appeared online, Sotloffs mother, Shirley, made a videotaped plea to ISIS leader al-Baghdadi to have mercy on her son. At the end of the video that appeared to show Sotloffs death, the militant in black stands beside another kneeling hostage, identified as a British citizen. We take this opportunity to warn those governments that enter this evil alliance of America against the Islamic State [ISIS] to back off and leave our people alone, he says.Once again, the airstrikes continued and other Western hostages were killed on camera in similarly gruesome fashion. ISISs last known American hostage, 26-year-old Kayla Mueller, died in the hands of the terror group, the White House said in February 2015, though its unclear how she died.Mueller had traveled the world as an aid worker before her death, going wherever she thought she could help those in desperate need.For as long as I live, I will not let this suffering be normal, she told her local newspaper in 2013. [I will not let this be] something we just accept It is important to stop and realize what we have, why we have it and how privileged we are. And from that place, start caring and get a lot done. [Last updated: Feb. 23, 2015]

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July 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS: The first terror group to build an Islamic state? – CNN

ISIS: The first terror group to build an Islamic state? – CNN’);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘world/2014/06/12/ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘large-media_0’,adsection: ‘const-article-pagetop’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: {“mini”:{“height”:144,”width”:256,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-hp-video.jpg”},”xsmall”:{“height”:169,”width”:300,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-story-body.jpg”},”small”:{“height”:360,”width”:640,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-story-top.jpg”},”medium”:{“height”:552,”width”:980,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-horizontal-large-gallery.jpg”},”large”:{“height”:552,”width”:980,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-horizontal-large-gallery.jpg”},”full16x9″:{“height”:552,”width”:980,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-horizontal-large-gallery.jpg”},”mini1x1″:{“height”:60,”width”:60,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/140612203919-ac-dnt-cooper-isis-backgrounder-00000319-topics.jpg”}}},autoStartVideo = false,isVideoReplayClicked = false,callbackObj,containerEl,currentVideoCollection = [],currentVideoCollectionId = ”,isLivePlayer = false,mediaMetadataCallbacks,moveToNextTimeout,mutePlayerEnabled = false,nextVideoId = ”,nextVideoUrl = ”,turnOnFlashMessaging = false,videoPinner,videoEndSlateImpl;if (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === false) {autoStartVideo = true;if (autoStartVideo === true) {if (turnOnFlashMessaging === true) {autoStartVideo = false;containerEl = jQuery(document.getElementById(configObj.markupId));CNN.VideoPlayer.showFlashSlate(containerEl);} else {CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = true;}}}configObj.autostart = autoStartVideo;CNN.VideoPlayer.setPlayerProperties(configObj.markupId, autoStartVideo, isLivePlayer, isVideoReplayClicked, mutePlayerEnabled);CNN.VideoPlayer.setFirstVideoInCollection(currentVideoCollection, configObj.markupId);videoEndSlateImpl = new CNN.VideoEndSlate(‘large-media_0’);/*** Finds the next video ID and URL in the current collection, if available.* @param currentVideoId The video that is currently playing* @param containerId The parent container Id of the video element*/function findNextVideo(currentVideoId) {var i,vidObj;if (currentVideoId && jQuery.isArray(currentVideoCollection) && currentVideoCollection.length > 0) {for (i = 0; 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He is dressed in a suit and tie and could pass for a midlevel bureaucrat. But the photograph is that of Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, who has transformed a few terror cells harried to the verge of extinction into the most dangerous militant group in the world. The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria has thrived and mutated during the ongoing civil war in Syria and in the security vacuum that followed the departure of the last American forces from Iraq. The aim of ISIS is to create an Islamic state across Sunni areas of Iraq and in Syria. With the seizure of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, and advances on others, that aim appears within reach. ISIS controls hundreds of square miles where state authority has evaporated. It ignores international borders and has a presence all the way from Syria’s Mediterranean coast to south of Baghdad. What are its origins? In 2006, al Qaeda in Iraq — under the ruthless leadership of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi — embarked on seemingly arbitrary and brutal treatment of civilians as it tried to ignite a sectarian war against the majority Shia community. It came close to succeeding, especially after the bombing of the Al-Askariya Mosque, an important Shia shrine in Samarra, which sparked retaliatory attacks. But the killing of al-Zarqawi by American forces, the vicious treatment of civilians and the emergence of the Sahwa (Awakening) Fronts under moderate Sunni tribal leaders nearly destroyed the group. Nearly, but not quite. When U.S. forces left Iraq, they took much of their intelligence-gathering expertise with them. Iraqi officials began to speak of a “third generation” of al Qaeda in Iraq. The capability of those Iraqi forces was fatally compromised by a lack of professional soldiers, the division of military units along sectarian lines and a lack of the equipment needed for fighting an insurgency, such as attack helicopters and reconnaissance capabilities. The new al Qaeda was rebranded in 2006 as the Islamic State in Iraq (ISI). It would add “and Syria” to its name later. The group exploited a growing perception among many Sunnis that they were being persecuted by the Shia-dominated government led by Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, starved of resources and excluded from a share of power. The arrest of senior Sunni political figures and heavy-handed suppression of Sunni dissent were the best recruiting sergeants ISI could have. And it helped the new leader re-establish the group’s influence. Who is its master of terror? Abu Bakr al Baghdadi graduated to the top job in 2010 — at the age of 39 — after Abu Omar al Baghdadi was killed in a joint U.S.-Iraqi operation. Al Baghdadi’s group was in a pitiful state. But with U.S. forces and intelligence on the way out, he launched a revival. Very little is known about Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, but a biography posted on jihadist websites last year said he held a Ph.D. in Islamic studies from a university in the capital. He formed his own militant group in the Samarra and Diyala areas, where his family was from, before joining al Qaeda in Iraq. Al Baghdadi even served four years in a U.S. prison camp for insurgents, at Bucca in southern Iraq — a time in which he almost certainly developed a network of contacts and honed his ideology. He was released in 2009 and went to work. What is ISIS trying to accomplish? It wants to establish an Islamic caliphate, or state, stretching across the region. ISIS has begun imposing Sharia law in the towns it controls. Boys and girls must be separated at school; women must wear the niqab or full veil in public. Sharia courts often dispense brutal justice, music is banned and the fast is enforced during Ramadan. Sharia law covers both religious and non-religious aspects of life. Where does the group’s money come from? In the beginning, al Baghdadi focused on secrecy — with loosely connected cells making it more difficult to hunt down the leadership — and on money. Extortion, such as demanding money from truck drivers and threatening to blow up businesses, was one revenue stream; robbing banks and gold shops was another. It seemed the group had become little more than gangsters, but the income would help finance a growing stream of suicide attacks and assassinations that would poison the political atmosphere. It would also aid the recruitment of Sunni tribal fighters and finance spectacular prison raids that liberated hundreds of fighters, as well as attacks on police patrols and the assassination of officials. Now, al Baghdadi has a new strategy for generating resources: large-scale attacks aimed at capturing and holding territory. Ayham Kamel of the Eurasia Group, a U.S.-based consultancy, says that in the latest iteration of this strategy, ISIS will “use cash reserves from Mosul’s banks, military equipment from seized military and police bases and the release of 2,500 fighters from local jails to bolster its military and financial capability.” What’s been its key to survival? Al Baghdadi avoided al-Zarqawi’s mistakes by avoiding the alienation of powerful tribal figures. When it captured Falluja, west of Baghdad, in January, it worked with local tribal leaders rather than raise its black flag over the city. One of the group’s ideologues, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, even admitted: “As for our mistakes, we do not deny them. Rather, we will continue to make mistakes as long as we are humans. God forbid that we commit mistakes deliberately.” How is it drawing support? ISIS is, in essence, trying to capture and channel the resentment of the Sunni street. And in both Syria and Iraq, it is trying to win favor through dawa — organizing social welfare programs and even recreational activities for children, distributing food and fuel to the needy, and setting up clinics. Again, having the money matters. The price it demands is enforcement of the strict Sharia code. How does Syria fit into the picture? A senior U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN this week that ISIS looks at Syria and Iraq as “one interchangeable battlefield and its ability to shift resources and personnel across the border has measurably strengthened its position in both theaters.” The explosion of violence in Syria was a gift to al Baghdadi. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad lost control over large parts of the North and the long border with Iraq. The group, still known as ISI at the time, could build a rear base where it could recruit foreign fighters, organize and escape from any Iraqi army operations. Al Baghdadi may have sent operatives across the border as early as the autumn of 2011, and the group later changed its name — adding “al Sham” for Syria. It moved swiftly to take control of the Syrian province of Raqqa, aided by the al-Assad regime’s focus on Homs and Aleppo. What is its relationship with other al Qaeda groups? As it has grown in strength, the group’s vision of a caliphate under its control has expanded. Its ambition extended to declaring early in 2013 that it was absorbing another militant group in Syria, the al-Nusra Front. According to some accounts, al Baghdadi had been instrumental in creating the group; now he wanted its obedience. The declaration — and al-Nusra’s rejection of it — set off a rare public clash between two groups that both saw themselves as part of al Qaeda. From his hideout somewhere in Afghanistan or Pakistan, al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri at first tried to mediate between the two, and then disowned ISIS when it refused to concentrate on Iraq. Rather than seek reconciliation, ISIS has hit back. Earlier this year, the group’s spokesman, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, told al-Zawahiri in a recording: “Sheikh Osama (bin Laden) gathered all the mujahideen with one word, but you divided them and tore them apart.” “You make the mujahideen sad, and make the enemy of the mujahideen gloat because you support the traitor, and you make the heart bleed,” he said — referring to the leader of the al-Nusra Front, Abu Mohammed al-Jolani. It was another sign of the extraordinary confidence of the ISIS leadership. Despite the rift, ISIS’ success against what are seen by militant Sunnis as loathsome Shia regimes in Syria and Iraq has attracted thousands of foreign fighters to its ranks, enabling it to continue battling al-Nusra in Syria while preparing for its big offensive in Iraq. What is its strategy? For Western counterterrorism agencies, the combination of fanaticism and disciplined organization is the nightmare scenario. ISIS has plenty of both. While the world was shocked by its sudden capture of the city of Falluja, ISIS was still focused on a bigger prize: Mosul and the province of Nineveh. Operations in Falluja and elsewhere in the western province of Anbar were meant to (and did) draw Iraqi forces away from the north. It has developed an ability to conduct operations — from suicide bombings and attacks on the security forces to wresting control of towns — in several regions at once, keeping the demoralized Iraqi army off balance. And battle experience has created a resilient force capable of ever more sophisticated attacks. In raids on Samarra, for example, its fighters used bulldozers to remove barriers that had been in place since the U.S. occupation. Some analysts expect critical parts of the Iraqi oil infrastructure around Mosul to be among its future targets. Where does its weakness lie? ISIS runs the risk that its rapid expansion — and threat to the Iraqi state — will overstretch the group. In northern Syria, it has retreated from some towns it held after clashes with al-Nusra and other groups. Al-Nusra is making common cause with other groups in an anti-ISIS front. And by taking Mosul, which Iraq’s Kurds see as in their sphere of interest, ISIS may invite greater cooperation between the Iraqi army and experienced Kurdish fighters. A U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN that ISIS “still has significant weaknesses. It has shown little ability to govern effectively, is generally unpopular, and has no sway outside the Sunni community in either Iraq or Syria.” To many analysts, that smacks of complacency. How significant is its threat? The weakness of the governments ISIS is confronting — and the hatred for those governments among Sunnis — means that a few dozen truckloads of fighters can seize towns and cities, overcoming forces many times larger by their sheer ferocity and battle experience. In the words of the Soufan Group, a political risk consultancy, “ISIS has become indisputably the most effective and ruthless terrorist organization in the world.” “It now challenges the authority of two of the largest states in the Middle East, and has attracted significant numbers of fighters, not just from Iraq and Syria, but also from Saudi Arabia and other Arab states including Jordan.” There is no doubting the group’s confidence and ambition. ISIS spokesman al-Adnani took to Twitter Wednesday to declare, “The battle is not yet raging it, but it will rage in Baghdad and Karbala. Put on your belts and get ready,” according to a translation by the SITE Intelligence Group. Al-Adnani openly mocked al-Maliki as an underwear salesman who had lost Iraq for the Shia. “You lost a historic opportunity for your people to control Iraq,” he said, “and the Shi’ites will always curse you for as long as they live.”

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July 13, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Fast Facts – CNN

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Listen to the story of a survivor.”},{“title”:”Iraq forces and ISIS exchange gunfire”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/161017163221-nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig-00004713-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/10/17/nick-paton-walsh-mosul-isis-gunfire-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh got caught up in gunfire between Iraq forces and ISIS outside of Mosul.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh got caught up in gunfire between Iraq forces and ISIS outside of Mosul.”},{“title”:”Majority of ISIS victims are Muslim”,”duration”:”01:24″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160714185630-iraqi-women-mourn-suicide-bombing-baghdad-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/07/14/isis-victims-muslims-clarissa-ward-explainer-orig-sfc.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Despite ISIS frequent calls for attacks in Europe and the United States, its biggest victims, often forgotten, are Muslims living outside Western countries.”,”descriptionText”:”Despite ISIS frequent calls for attacks in Europe and the United States, its biggest victims, often forgotten, are Muslims living outside Western countries.”},{“title”:”Is it ISIS, ISIL or Daesh?”,”duration”:”01:23″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/151127115516-isis-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2015/11/27/isis-isil-or-daesh-orig-sdg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Many call it ISIS, Barack Obama refers to it as ISIL, while for others it’s Daesh. What should we call this terror group?”,”descriptionText”:”Many call it ISIS, Barack Obama refers to it as ISIL, while for others it’s Daesh. What should we call this terror group?”},{“title”:”ISIS’ battle tactics”,”duration”:”02:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160822185438-isis-war-tactics-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/08/22/isis-battle-tactics-mosul-arwa-damon-sdg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”From burning oil to impair the visibility of coalition aircraft and drones, to underground tunnels and home-made weapons, CNN’s Arwa Damon explains ISIS’ latest battle tactics in Iraq.”,”descriptionText”:”From burning oil to impair the visibility of coalition aircraft and drones, to underground tunnels and home-made weapons, CNN’s Arwa Damon explains ISIS’ latest battle tactics in Iraq.”},{“title”:”Why Libya matters to ISIS”,”duration”:”00:46″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160219084702-isis-fighters-in-libya-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/05/17/isis-libya-nick-paton-walsh-mobile-orig-mss.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-paton-walsh”> Nick Paton Walshu003c/a> explains why ISIS is beginning to move its forces from Iraq and Syria to Libya.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-paton-walsh”> Nick Paton Walshu003c/a> explains why ISIS is beginning to move its forces from Iraq and Syria to Libya.”},{“title”:”ISIS hates this religious group the most”,”duration”:”01:57″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/151019140613-isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm-00000923-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/tv/2015/10/19/isis-hates-yazidis-terrorist-group-target-orig-cm.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”ISIS targets one specific religious community the most. CNN’s Ivan Watson explains who they are and why ISIS hates them. “,”descriptionText”:”ISIS targets one specific religious community the most. CNN’s Ivan Watson explains who they are and why ISIS hates them. “},{“title”:”Iraqis recount horrors of being human shields for ISIS”,”duration”:”02:44″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160407043606-iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg-00013513-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/07/iraq-isis-human-shields-damon-pkg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”In a CNN exclusive, Arwa Damon meets Iraqis who were held by ISIS and used as human shields.”,”descriptionText”:”In a CNN exclusive, Arwa Damon meets Iraqis who were held by ISIS and used as human shields.”},{“title”:”ISIS calls on Saudi supporters to kill relatives”,”duration”:”02:43″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160421002234-isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg-00002526-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/21/isis-fratricide-robertson-pkg.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”Saudi Arabia is confronting a deadly campaign by ISIS to overthrow the monarchy. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nic-robertson”> Nic Robertsonu003c/a> reports the militants are calling on their supporters to target family members who work in security forces.”,”descriptionText”:”Saudi Arabia is confronting a deadly campaign by ISIS to overthrow the monarchy. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nic-robertson”> Nic Robertsonu003c/a> reports the militants are calling on their supporters to target family members who work in security forces.”},{“title”:”Why is ISIS heading to Libya?”,”duration”:”02:30″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160420175729-isis-in-libya-1-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/20/why-is-isis-heading-to-libya-sdg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”ISIS is under a lot of pressure in Syria and in Iraq and is now heading to Libya. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen explains why new ISIS recruits are seeing Libya as an easier place to join insurgency. “,”descriptionText”:”ISIS is under a lot of pressure in Syria and in Iraq and is now heading to Libya. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen explains why new ISIS recruits are seeing Libya as an easier place to join insurgency. “},{“title”:”Iraqi town suffering from ISIS chemical attack”,”duration”:”02:34″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160418194917-iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today-00010115-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2016/04/18/iraqi-town-suffering-after-isis-chemical-attack-damon-pkg-cnn-today.cnn/video/playlists/isis-power-an-terror/”,”description”:”CNN’s Arwa Damon reports on the use of chemical weapons in Iraq by ISIS and the devastation in one Iraqi town.”,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s Arwa Damon reports on the use of chemical weapons in Iraq by ISIS and the devastation in one Iraqi town.”}],’js-video_headline-featured-15zr83h’,”,”js-video_source-featured-15zr83h”,true,true,’isis-power-an-terror’);if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length

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ISIS Is Not a Terrorist Group | Foreign Affairs

After 9/11, many within the U.S. national security establishment worried that, following decades of preparation for confronting conventional enemies, Washington was unready for the challenge posed by an unconventional adversary such as al Qaeda. So over the next decade, the United States built an elaborate bureaucratic structure to fight the jihadist organization, adapting its military and its intelligence and law enforcement agencies to the tasks of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. Now, however, a different group, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), which also calls itself the Islamic State, has supplanted al Qaeda as the jihadist threat of greatest concern. ISIS ideology, rhetoric, and long-term goals are similar to al Qaedas, and the two groups were once formally allied. So many observers assume that the current challenge is simply to refocus Washingtons now-formidable counterterrorism apparatus on a new target. But ISIS is not al Qaeda. It is not an outgrowth or a part of the older radical Islamist organization, nor does it represent the next phase in its evolution. Although al Qaeda remains dangerousespecially its affiliates in North Africa and YemenISIS is its successor. ISIS represents the postal Qaeda jihadist threat. In a nationally televised speech last September explaining his plan to degrade and ultimately destroy ISIS, U.S. President Barack Obama drew a straight line between the group and al Qaeda and claimed that ISIS is a terrorist organization, pure and simple. This was mistaken; ISIS hardly fits that description, and indeed, although it uses terrorism as a tactic, it is not really a terrorist organization at all. Terrorist networks, such as al Qaeda, generally have only dozens or hundreds of members, attack civilians, do not hold territory, and cannot directly confront military forces. ISIS, on the other hand, boasts some 30,000 fighters, holds territory in both Iraq and Syria, maintains extensive military capabilities, controls lines of communication, commands infrastructure, funds itself, and engages in sophisticated military operations. If ISIS is purely and simply anything, it

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Hunting ISIS: History Series to Follow American Voluteer …

by Jessica Pena, May 7, 2018 History is on the hunt. Recently, the network announced their new TV show,Hunting ISIS, will premiere later this month. The docuseries follows a group of veteran and civilian volunteers who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight against ISIS alongside local militias. Hunting ISISpremieres on History onMay 29th at 10 p.m. ET/PT. Read more info below: May 2, 2018 New York HISTORY follows a group of veteran and civilian volunteers who travel to Syria and Iraq to fight against ISIS alongside local militias in the original documentary series, Hunting ISIS. The 6-episode series premieres on Tuesday, May 29 at 10pm ET/PT. Following its broadcast on HISTORY, the series will air on VICELAND on Sunday, June 3 at 10pm ET/PT. Hunting ISIS, a co-production of HISTORY and VICELAND, is produced by Delirio Films and directed by Sebastiano Tomada. John Battsek (Restrepo, Searching for Sugarman) serves as Executive Producer alongside Delirios Rafael Marmor and Christopher Leggett. The terrorist organization known as ISIS emerged as a menace in the Middle East years before most in the West took notice of their attacks abroad. More brutal than Al Qaeda before them, ISIS took advantage of chaos caused by Syrias still-raging Civil War and the United States withdrawal from Iraq to recruit heavily in the region. In 2014, the world watched as they swept across Iraq and Syria, capturing wide territories and ruthlessly killing or enslaving anyone who showed signs of resistance as they declared themselves the Islamic State. Local forces backed by a U.S.-led coalition of western military powers began fighting back, but progress has taken years. Not content to sit back and watch ISIS devastate the Middle East from afar, scores of western volunteers have since traveled to region to join the fight against the terrorist group. Through the eyes of American fighters embedded with the Kurdish YPG militia in Syria, and medics supporting a coalition of local forces in Iraq, Hunting ISIS follows these men as they begin the difficult push to retake ISIS capital cities. Completely unpaid and unsupported by their governments, western volunteers have many reasons for joining the fight. Some are military veterans craving the familiar adrenaline rush and brotherhood of combat, who shoulder a sense of unfinished business in the Middle East. Some are civilians eager to test their mettle while searching for a greater purpose. All are united in their determination to defend the innocent and end the atrocities being committed by ISIS. With unprecedented access, this documentary series witnesses their unique role in one of the defining conflicts of our time, exploring whats driving these men to war. Filmmaker and award-winning photographer Sebastiano Tomada built his career documenting conflict in some of the worlds most volatile warzones. Hunting ISIS is the culmination of over two years embedded in the trenches in Iraq and Syria, granting visceral, intimate access to the front lines of the war against ISIS and those individuals who give up everything to fight it. Hunting ISIS is produced by Delirio Films for HISTORY. Rafael Marmor and Christopher Leggett are Executive Producers for Delirio. Melinda Toporoff is Executive Producer for HISTORY. Gena Konstantinakos and Patrick Moses are Executive Producers for VICELAND. A+E Networks holds worldwide distribution rights for the series. What do you think? Do you watch History? Will you check outHunting ISIS?

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ISIS IS True Islam | Walid Shoebat

By Walid Shoebat (Shoebat Exclusive) Reading the papersis reading authors of confusion. They say Saudi top cleric blasts al-Qaida and ISIS as enemy No. 1 of Islam in a statement issued in Riyadh. The ideas of extremism, radicalism and terrorism have nothing to do with Islam and (their proponents) are the enemy number one of Islam, the kingdoms top cleric said. He cited jihadists from the Islamic State, which has declared a caliphate straddling parts of Iraq and Syria, and the global al-Qaida terror network. Really? ISIS and al-Qaida do not represent Islam? ISIS IS ISlam and ISlam is ISIS. Muslims frequently say that we, the critics of Islam know nothing about Islam. They relentlessly exhaust us with this statement that ISIS terrorists do not understand true Islam. I finally capitulate. They are correct. The truth is that no one truly understands true Islam, neither Muslim scholars nor Muslims in general. Even the best of its secular critics dont understand it.The only way to fully understand Islam is to be the devil himself. Not even Caliph Al-Baghdadi, the head of the ISIS understands true Islam for he is unaware that he worships the devil in disguise as God. We sit around calling ourselves experts and we argue over Jihad and its many meanings. Than we talk about stealth Jihad and creeping Sharia. Than we talk about how to reform Islam, so we elevate well-dressed groomed Muslims to promote this new form of reformed Islam. The Muslim world looks at us and laughs saying that we still do not understand true Islam regardless that if we point the finger at the extremists or the moderates. Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the most prominent Sunni Muslim scholar (for sure he should understand true Islam) looks at us mockingly saying: They speak not of the one Islam as revealed by Allah but of manufactured Islams, plural, several different Islams, which they desire to create. Sometimes they even divide Islam by regions. There is the Asian variety of Islam; then we have the African Islam. Sometimes, according to the ages, there is the Prophets era of Islam, Rashidi Islam, Umayyad Islam, Abbasid Islam, Ottoman Islam and modern Islam. Sometimes, according to race, there is Arab Islam, Indian Islam, Turkish Islam, and the Islam of the Malaysian And so on and so forth. Sometimes, according to the doctrine, there is Sunni Islam and Shiite Islam. They even divide the Sunni and the Shia into divisions. New divisions have also been created; there is revolutionary Islam, reactionary Islam, radical Islam, classical Islam, right-wing Islam, leftist Islam, orthodox Islam, modern Islam and, finally, political Islam, spiritual Islam and theological Islam. Why do they invent such divisions that are rejected in Islam? The truth is that these divisions are all unacceptable in the eyes of a Muslim; there is only one Islam, which has no partners, which recognizes no other; it is the first Islam, the Islam of the Quran and Sunnah. (Accusing Islam with Politics by Dr. Yusuf Qaradawi, 10/28/2011)8 Indeed, even Qaradawi who himself does not understand Islam had this one right; there is only one true Islam. What he iswrong about is that Islam is not from God but is of the devil. Period. And since no human fully understands the devil, they have it wrong; they do not understand Islam. No Muslim understands Islam. To understand Islam, we all, rich and poor, lame and mute, grew up taking a copy of that green colored book; its cover was illuminated in beautiful Arabic gold script. We were made to read it while we reclined our backs on stone hewn columns surmounted by decorated arches. We mesmerized our inner souls hearing ourselves reciting incomprehensible abstract thoughts and fragmented verses while bobbing our heads sitting under melancholy domed shrines that hovered over these beautiful specimens of Persian rugs donated courtesy of wealthy Arab princes. It was rather a peculiar hodgepodge they all said was divine. For over millennia it was a bestseller in the east and still is. Everyone had external reverence that at any moment when they heard the recitation in the ancient classical Arabic tongue they become hypnotized by some external force, humbling themselves, ready to carry out sacred instructions to kill infidels as if under a spell from the Master Hypnotist. No giant would even dare call this book a fiction, in respect to its avid readers who believed it was sent to them from the seventh heavendictaphoned by a colorful angel of lightto a humble illiterate servant of God. My life journey to understanding Islam was filled with thorns and obstacles, which I finally managed to pluck out of my wandering soul. The prickling thorns were thrust to my side by what was left behind from the writ of a sojourner named Muhammad who once alleged that a bright angel of light once visited him while he frequented a mysterious cave called Ghar Hira in Arabia. There he was dictaphonedso he claimedthe word of a god named Maliki-Rab-ul-Alameen, The King-Lord of The Worlds who was the god of this world and the god of the underworld. The sojourner who claimed to be prophet then desired to ascend to heaven, to the most high. So he alleged that one night that he was transported in a twinkling of an eye far away up to the heavens riding on the back of another being, a hybrid of a winged steed, part woman, part peacock he called Buraq. But the time I only began to understand something about Islam was the day I opened a Bible when I still was Muslim in 1993. I ineluctably began to turn its pages. As it turned out it spoke of such stories of this Buraq already mentioned in the Quran even foretelling that story a millennium before of a rebellious beautiful bright angel of light, with every precious stone was your covering: the ruby, the topaz, and the diamond; the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper; the lapis lazuli, the turquoise, and the emerald; and the gold, the workmanship of your setting and sockets was in you *(Ezekiel 28:13)* He than arose to be the worlds leadingheresiarch, an Antichrist who denies Father and Son (1 John 2:22) and claimed in his Al-Isra Wal-Miraj to have ascended to heaven (Isaiah 14:13) reaching the seventh heaven claiming, as it says in Isaiah 14:13, You said in your heart, I will ascend to heaven; above the stars of God claiming to meet God who ordered him to rule over all of mankind, angels and the whole multitudes of demons. Then I read Gods oracles concerning the Desert which God called Babylon, Dumah, Kedar and even Arabia with a proclamation that said: Babylon is fallen, is fallen, (Isaiah 21:9, Revelation 18:1-2) These were all in the land of the sojourner, the man with the Buraq steed and are where the city of that virgin bride cloaked in black silk, decked with silver and gold. And for my predilection to read this book (the Bible) over the other (Quran), the giants said that they would sever my head as they severed the heads of thousand thousands before me. Yet even this peril was foretold in the book, which they forbade us to read. Then, and way later, when I dared to speak negatively of it, the media giants who even knew the book was hypnotic fiction, were grieved and alleged that I knew little about the sacred text. Publishers avoided me fearing the frenzy of the mobs, the same mobs that converged like a river once a year swirling roundabout the idol they had erected long ago in the midst of this Babel telling me that Islam was peaceful. Was Islam peaceful when Omar bin Al-Khattab began to advance into Christian Byzantine territory? Was Islam peaceful and did not behave as ISIS did when Muslims during the decisive Battle of Yarmouk in August 636 when the Christian Emperor Heraclius was defeated by Islamic hordes? Was Islam not behaving like ISIS when Sophronius, the Christian Arab from Bethlehem who was at the time Patriarch of Jerusalem, how in his sermon on the Day of the Epiphany 636 A.D. he bewailed the destruction of the churches and monasteries, how the sacked towns, the fields laid waste, the villages burned down by the Muslim nomads who were overrunning the country then to later invade Jerusalem itself and occupy it under Umar bin Al-Khattab. Was Saudi Arabia and Qatar not acting like ISIS when they send incursions into Syria of replicas of the same ancient savages, beheading Christians, raping, burning and destroying everything in sight; the American Christian initially was unaware, despite our warnings, that he would take the side of such savages in full support of the so-called Free Syrian Army, Muslims from different nations whom converged into Syria to carry out the Harlots interest of Saudi Arabia. The American have not learned the lessons from history about what Arabia has done to the Christian world beginning in the conquest of Christian Syria in 637, the conquest of Christian Armenia, 639, to later massacre 1.2 Million Armenian Christians in 1915. Have we seen any difference between the Islam of ISIS and the Islam of the Ottomans? And then we had the conquest of Christian Egypt in 639 A.D., in which the population of the Christian Copts gradually decreased from nine million to 700,000 at the early 1900s. And Egypt is an important case-in-point regarding peaceful Islam. It is a fact of history that the Egyptians allowed the Muslims into their country. When the Egyptian populace heard that the Muslims were arriving, they accepted them with open arms, not seeing them as deceiving heretics, but as people who merely believed in the one true God. Their open mindedness would have received the applause of the moderns, but the end result was the consequence of all ultra equality and tolerance: violence. For decades I roamed the world of cowards, politicians, media giants and even conservatives who claimed to believe in the purists of truths to only find out they were riddled with the ignorance that was born out of their inner fears. They too would not dare call the devil devil. But I stood and confronted the wizards; these goliaths that carried swords in one hand and that book of fictions they used for shield in the other telling them that their victories with the sword will be until all bow towards their image, but as long as there are a few who choose their scimitar blade over prostrating in submission to tyranny, that victory is for the slain who refuse to bow to their devil. The Bible proclaimed warnings to the nave multitudes foretelling even these giants, the ones with the scimitars, coming to the city gates proclaiming that Islam is peace peace peace. For decades, I began to shout from the rooftops. The giants are coming With Trojan horses they come to the city gates they bring charmers, wizards and star gazers they deceive by peace to only find out that I am but a lone voice crying in the wilderness; a watchman on walls sounding a trumpet to nave western multitudes dazzled by charmers and the stargazers whose outcry of hes a liar an impostor an ant who never saw giants there are no Trojan horses at the city gates while the naive slander with a sharp tongue saying that my declarations were fiction, that I need to be brought down from the city walls and sent into banishment. So they sent the giants to bring me down, but their efforts were all in vain. In this hear the sound of my trumpet, hear not and your blood is on your hands.

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