Archive for the ‘Israel’ Category

Inappropriate Comedy – Wikipedia

Inappropriate Comedy (stylized asinAPPropriate Comedy) is a 2013 American satirical sketch comedy film directed by Vince Offer. It stars Ari Shaffir (who also co-wrote), Rob Schneider, Michelle Rodriguez, Adrien Brody and Lindsay Lohan, and was released on March 22, 2013.[2][3]

The film was originally envisioned as a sequel to Offer’s previous anthology, The Underground Comedy Movie, and called Underground Comedy 2010.[4] It is also a partial remake of Offer’s previous film, recycling the sketches “Flirty Harry” and “Sushi Mama”.

The framing device has Vince Offer pressing buttons on his tablet computer that open offensive applications.[5]

A psychologist (Rob Schneider) has a session with a sex-obsessed young woman (Noelle Kenney) who wants to change. She shows him the pills that make her wild. He takes them and passes out on the floor.

Flirty Harry (Adrien Brody) is a cop who, with a repertoire of double entendres, patrols the streets of New York.

A Jackass spoof, where Vondell (Da’Vone McDonald), Murphay (Calvin Sykes), Swade (Thai Edwards), Darnell (Chalant Phifer), and Acquon (Ashton Jordaan Ruiz) are five African American guys who go about their days causing trouble.

J.D. (Rob Schneider), Harriet (Michelle Rodriguez), and Bob (Jonathan Spencer) (who spends most of the time masturbating) host an At the Movies-style film review series that showcases pornographic films, including the dubbed Asian film “Sushi Mama” and a homosexual parody of Swan Lake known as Sperm Lake.

A beautiful young woman (Kiersten Hall) dating an old poor man (Anthony Russell).

Lindsay Lohan stands on an air vent much like Marilyn Monroe’s famous scene from The Seven Year Itch while a man (Vince Offer) watches her from underneath.

A spoof of The Amazing Race. Ari Shaffir and his cameraman go around the city showcasing extremely racist and offensive stereotypes against Asians, African Americans, Arabs, Hispanics and Jews. It is heavily implied that all of Shaffir’s doings were not rehearsed and done to random people on the street.

Lohan’s scenes were shot in 2010 for Underground Comedy 2010, a production that would have mixed newly filmed sketches with sketches from the original 1997 production of The Underground Comedy Movie. The alcohol-detecting ankle monitor she was ordered to wear after she failed to show up for a court hearing is clearly visible as she stands on the street grate.

A trailer for Underground Comedy 2010 was released in August of that year. The project was eventually expanded to a fully new feature film with the production of additional new sketches.[4] Ari Shaffir’s segment mixed footage with unknowing collaborators and staged action, mostly using the same people brought back “to do a little extra so we can build a story or get me some comeuppance”.[6]

The film is directed by Vince Offer, who also directed The Underground Comedy Movie and, between the two films, became better known for his infomercial sales pitches (his best known product being the ShamWow absorbent towel).

InAPPropriate Comedy was called worse than Movie 43 by Frank Scheck of The Hollywood Reporter.[7] Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 0%, based on 5 reviews.[8]

At Metacritic, it holds a score of 1 out of 100, based on 5 reviews, meaning overwhelming dislike.[9] It is tied with Bio-Dome, The Singing Forest, Chaos, Not Cool, 10 Rules for Sleeping Around and United Passions as the worst reviewed film on the site.

Lohan was nominated for a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress for her performance in the film (also for Scary Movie 5), but lost to Kim Kardashian for Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor.

The film earned $172,000 from 275 theaters, for a location average of $625 in its opening weekend.[1][10][11]

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November 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Fresno State professor calls Barbara Bush "amazing racist …

A Fresno State professor called former first lady Barbara Bush an amazing racist who raised a war criminal, and expressed no concern that she could be fired or reprimanded for her outspokenness on social media.

Randa Jarrar, a professor in Fresno States Department of English, expressed her displeasure with the Bush family within an hour after the official announcement that Mrs. Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92.

Barbara Bush was a generous and smart and amazing racist who, along with her husband, raised a war criminal, Jarrar wrote on Twitter. F— outta here with your nice words.

Fresno State professor Randa Jarrar went on a twitter rant that lasted more than 5 hours. And it started with this tweet, criticizing the late first lady Barbara Bush.

Twitter screen shot

Jarrars tweet generated more than 2,000 replies back to her, with many upset at her and tagging Fresno State and University President Joseph Castro in their comments.

Jarrar, who in her Twitter messages describes herself as an Arab-American and a Muslim-American woman, goes on to maintain that she is a tenured professor and makes $100,000 a year.

I will never be fired, Jarrar tweeted.

In a separate tweet, she wrote: If you’d like to know what it’s like to be an Arab American Muslim American woman with some clout online expressing an opinion, look at the racists going crazy in my mentions right now.

Jarrar even encouraged those of Twitter to reach out to Fresno State and to Castro, offering up their Twitter handles.

What I love about being an American professor is my right to free speech, and what I love about Fresno State is that I always feel protected and at home here, Jarrar wrote. GO BULLDOGS!

Randa Jarrar said she’s a tenured professor at Fresno State and can’t be fired. She encouraged those who were upset at her to reach out to the university and Fresno State president Joseph Castro

Twitter screen shot

By around 10:21 p.m., Jarrar made her Twitter account private. The Fresno Bee took screen shots of her tweets when the account was public.

Jarrar also changed her Twitter bio, removing the titles of her books and instead writing, “Currently on leave from Fresno State. This is my private account and represents my opinions.”

The university confirmed Jarrar has been on leave all semester.

On Amazon, negative reviews for her books began to appear, apparently in reaction to her tweets.

Fresno State, roughly three hours after Jarrars initial tweet about Bush, sent out a statement by Castro that addressed the outspoken professor.

On behalf of Fresno State, I extend my deepest condolences to the Bush family on the loss of our former First Lady, Barbara Bush, Castro says in the statement. We share the deep concerns expressed by others over the personal comments made today by professor Randa Jarrar, a professor in the English department at Fresno State.

Her statements were made as a private citizen, not as a representative at Fresno State.

Castro also added: Professor Jarrars expressed personal views and commentary are obviously contrary to the core values of our University, which include respect and empathy for individuals with divergent points of view, and a sincere commitment to mutual understanding and progress.”

The university is still looking into the matter, according to spokeswoman Patti Waid.

Messages left with Jarrar were not immediately returned.

In a statement, an official from a civil liberties organization that specializes in campus free speech defended Jarrar’s right to express herself.

“Fresno State correctly acknowledges that Jarrar’s tweets were made as a private citizen,” said Adam Steinbaugh, senior program officer for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. “As such, and because they touched upon a matter of public concern, Jarrar’s tweets are unquestionably protected speech under the First Amendment and Fresno State has no power to censor, punish or terminate Jarrar for them.”

According to Jarrar’s bio on the Fresno State’s website, Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. She grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and she moved to the U.S. after the Gulf War.

She received the 2014 Lannan Residency Program fellowship award, which is given for excellence in poetry writing, essays and scholarly articles as well as social justice activism.

Fresno State professor Randa Jarrar interacts with someone who flags her account with U.S. Homeland security.

Twitter screen shot

One person who responded to Jarrar tagged U.S. Homeland Security and noted that the professor lives in Fresno.

To which Jarrar tweeted back: LOL. @DHSgov has been watching me for like 25 years, bro. Our kids grew up together. But nice try.

Jarrar was active on Twitter for at least five hours Tuesday, responding to some critics, retweeting others who also were critical of the Bush family and taunting those who attacked her physical appearance.

She also provided a telephone number as if it was her contact number. But the listed number ended up going to a suicide/crisis line.

A handful of Twitter users tweeted messages of support as the negative comments were pouring in.

Jasmine Leiva, a Fresno State graduate, called Jarrar “a gem” and said Fresno State was “lucky to have her.”

“She cares about her students, is wildly talented, and told no lies,” Leiva wrote.

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November 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Jerusalems Peace Players – USAID Stories

When Liraz and Jinan get together, they playfully tease each other and erupt in giggles while sharing news about each others lives. When apart, they constantly text each other.

In short, Liraz, a 16-year-old Israeli, and Jinan, a 14-year-old Palestinian, are typical teenage girls.

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Jerusalems Peace Players – USAID Stories

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November 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Jerusalem Municipality – The Official Website

Disclaimers: This site is designed to be user utility, and material contained therein is not binding and does not replace the original study. The municipality is not liable for any errors, tampering, omission, addition, defect and binding version is the original version found in the municipality.

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November 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Anne Frank’s diary: mystery pages contained ‘dirty jokes …

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November 19, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Israel – HISTORY

Contents

Israel is small country in the Middle East, about the size of New Jersey, located on the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea and bordered by Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. The nation of Israelwith a population of more than 8 million people, most of them Jewishhas many important archaeological and religious sites considered sacred by Jews, Muslims and Christians alike, and a complex history with periods of peace and conflict.

Much of what scholars know about Israels ancient history comes from the Hebrew Bible. According to the text, Israels origins can be traced back to Abraham, who is considered the father of both Judaism (through his son Isaac) and Islam (through his son Ishmael).

Abrahams descendants were thought to be enslaved by the Egyptians for hundreds of years before settling in Canaan, which is approximately the region of modern-day Israel.

The word Israel comes from Abrahams grandson, Jacob, who was renamed Israel by the Hebrew God in the Bible.

King David ruled the region around 1000 B.C. His son, who became King Solomon, is credited with building the first holy temple in ancient Jerusalem. In about 931 B.C., the area was divided into two kingdoms: Israel in the north and Judah in the south.

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Around 722 B.C., the Assyrians invaded and destroyed the northern kingdom of Israel. In 568 B.C., the Babylonians conquered Jerusalem and destroyed the first temple, which was replaced by a second temple in about 516 B.C.

For the next several centuries, the land of modern-day Israel was conquered and ruled by various groups, including the Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians, Mamelukes, Islamists and others.

From 1517 to 1917, Israel, along with much of the Middle East, was ruled by the Ottoman Empire.

But World War I dramatically altered the geopolitical landscape in the Middle East. In 1917, at the height of the war, British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour submitted a letter of intent supporting the establishment of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. The British government hoped that the formal declarationknown thereafter as the Balfour Declarationwould encourage support for the Allies in World War I.

When World War I ended in 1918 with an Allied victory, the 400-year Ottoman Empire rule ended, and Great Britain took control over what became known as Palestine (modern-day Israel, Palestine and Jordan).

The Balfour Declaration and the British mandate over Palestine were approved by the League of Nations in 1922. Arabs vehemently opposed the Balfour Declaration, concerned that a Jewish homeland would mean the subjugation of Arab Palestinians.

The British controlled Palestine until Israel, in the years following the end of World War II, became an independent state in 1947.

Throughout Israels long history, tensions between Jews and Arab Muslims have existed. The complex hostility between the two groups dates all the way back to ancient times when they both populated the area and deemed it holy.

Both Jews and Muslims consider the city of Jerusalem sacred. It contains the Temple Mount, which includes the holy sites al-Aqsa Mosque, the Western Wall, the Dome of the Rock and more.

Much of the conflict in recent years has centered around who is occupying the following areas:

In the late 19th and early 20th century, an organized religious and political movement known as Zionism emerged among Jews.

Zionists wanted to reestablish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Massive numbers of Jews immigrated to the ancient holy land and built settlements. Between 1882 and 1903, about 35,000 Jews relocated to Palestine. Another 40,000 settled in the area between 1904 and 1914.

Many Jews living in Europe and elsewhere, fearing persecution during the Nazi reign, found refuge in Palestine and embraced Zionism. After the Holocaust and World War II ended, members of the Zionist movement primarily focused on creating an independent Jewish state.

Arabs in Palestine resisted the Zionism movement, and tensions between the two groups continue. An Arab nationalist movement developed as a result.

The United Nations approved a plan to partition Palestine into a Jewish and Arab state in 1947, but the Arabs rejected it.

In May 1948, Israel was officially declared an independent state with David Ben-Gurion, the head of the Jewish Agency, as the prime minister.

While this historic event seemed to be a victory for Jews, it also marked the beginning of more violence with the Arabs.

Following the announcement of an independent Israel, five Arab nationsEgypt, Jordan, Iraq, Syria, and Lebanonimmediately invaded the region in what became known as the 1948 Arab-Israeli War.

Civil war broke out throughout all of Israel, but a cease-fire agreement was reached in 1949. As part of the temporary armistice agreement, the West Bank became part of Jordan, and the Gaza Strip became Egyptian territory.

Numerous wars and acts of violence between Arabs and Jews have ensued since the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Some of these include:

Clashes between Israelis and Palestinians are still commonplace. Key territories of land are divided, but some are claimed by both groups. For instance, they both cite Jerusalem as their capital.

Both groups blame each other for terror attacks that kill civilians. While Israel doesnt officially recognize Palestine as a state, more than 135 UN member nations do.

Several countries have pushed for more peace agreements in recent years. Many have suggested a two-state solution but acknowledge that Israelis and Palestinians are unlikely to settle on borders.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has supported the two-state solution but has felt pressure to change his stance. Netanyahu has also been accused of encouraging Jewish settlements in Palestinian areas while still backing a two-state solution.

The United States is one of Israels closest allies. In a visit to Israel in May 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump urged Netanyahu to embrace peace agreements with Palestinians.

While Israel has been plagued by unpredictable war and violence in the past, many national leaders and citizens are hoping for a secure, stable nation in the future.

Sources:

History of Ancient Israel: Oxford Research Encyclopedias.

Creation of Israel, 1948: Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State.

The Arab-Israeli War of 1948: Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State.

History of Israel: Key events: BBC.

Israel: The World Factbook: U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Immigration to Israel: The Second Aliyah (1904 1914): Jewish Virtual Library.

Trump Comes to Israel Citing a Palestinian Deal as Crucial: The New York Times.

Palestine: Growing Recognition: Al Jazeera.

Mandatory Palestine: What It Was and Why It Matters: TIME.

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Curricula | Define Curricula at Dictionary.com

[kuh-rik-yuh-luhm]

ExamplesWord Origin

Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018

C19: from Latin: course, from currere to run

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

1824, from Modern Latin transferred use of classical Latin curriculum “a running, course, career” (also “a fast chariot, racing car”), from currere (see current (adj.)). Used in English as a Latin word since 1630s at Scottish universities.

Online Etymology Dictionary, 2010 Douglas Harper

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October 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

The New York Times – Search

EU Leaders to Seek Cyber Sanctions, Press Asia for Action: Draft Statements

The European Union should agree a sanctions law to target computer hackers by early next year, the bloc’s leaders are set to say on Thursday and will also seek a pledge from Russia and China to help stop cyber attacks, internal EU documents show.

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VIDEO: Home Depot Hands Out Free Plywood to Residents in Hurricane Florence’s Path

A Home Depot in Wilmington, North Carolina, is passing out plywood free of charge to residents who are in Hurricane Florence’s path as the region braces for the Category 2 storm’s impact.

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September 13, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Inappropriate Comedy – Wikipedia

Inappropriate Comedy (stylized asinAPPropriate Comedy) is a 2013 American satirical sketch comedy film directed by Vince Offer. It stars Ari Shaffir (who also co-wrote), Rob Schneider, Michelle Rodriguez, Adrien Brody and Lindsay Lohan, and was released on March 22, 2013.[2][3] The film was originally envisioned as a sequel to Offer’s previous anthology, The Underground Comedy Movie, and called Underground Comedy 2010.[4] It is also a partial remake of Offer’s previous film, recycling the sketches “Flirty Harry” and “Sushi Mama”. The framing device has Vince Offer pressing buttons on his tablet computer that open offensive applications.[5] A psychologist (Rob Schneider) has a session with a sex-obsessed young woman (Noelle Kenney) who wants to change. She shows him the pills that make her wild. He takes them and passes out on the floor. Flirty Harry (Adrien Brody) is a cop who, with a repertoire of double entendres, patrols the streets of New York. A Jackass spoof, where Vondell (Da’Vone McDonald), Murphay (Calvin Sykes), Swade (Thai Edwards), Darnell (Chalant Phifer), and Acquon (Ashton Jordaan Ruiz) are five African American guys who go about their days causing trouble. J.D. (Rob Schneider), Harriet (Michelle Rodriguez), and Bob (Jonathan Spencer) (who spends most of the time masturbating) host an At the Movies-style film review series that showcases pornographic films, including the dubbed Asian film “Sushi Mama” and a homosexual parody of Swan Lake known as Sperm Lake. A beautiful young woman (Kiersten Hall) dating an old poor man (Anthony Russell). Lindsay Lohan stands on an air vent much like Marilyn Monroe’s famous scene from The Seven Year Itch while a man (Vince Offer) watches her from underneath. A spoof of The Amazing Race. Ari Shaffir and his cameraman go around the city showcasing extremely racist and offensive stereotypes against Asians, African Americans, Arabs, Hispanics and Jews. It is heavily implied that all of Shaffir’s doings were not rehearsed and done to random people on the street. Lohan’s scenes were shot in 2010 for Underground Comedy 2010, a production that would have mixed newly filmed sketches with sketches from the original 1997 production of The Underground Comedy Movie. The alcohol-detecting ankle monitor she was ordered to wear after she failed to show up for a court hearing is clearly visible as she stands on the street grate. A trailer for Underground Comedy 2010 was released in August of that year. The project was eventually expanded to a fully new feature film with the production of additional new sketches.[4] Ari Shaffir’s segment mixed footage with unknowing collaborators and staged action, mostly using the same people brought back “to do a little extra so we can build a story or get me some comeuppance”.[6] The film is directed by Vince Offer, who also directed The Underground Comedy Movie and, between the two films, became better known for his infomercial sales pitches (his best known product being the ShamWow absorbent towel). InAPPropriate Comedy was called worse than Movie 43 by Frank Scheck of The Hollywood Reporter.[7] Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 0%, based on 5 reviews.[8] At Metacritic, it holds a score of 1 out of 100, based on 5 reviews, meaning overwhelming dislike.[9] It is tied with Bio-Dome, The Singing Forest, Chaos, Not Cool, 10 Rules for Sleeping Around and United Passions as the worst reviewed film on the site. Lohan was nominated for a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress for her performance in the film (also for Scary Movie 5), but lost to Kim Kardashian for Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor. The film earned $172,000 from 275 theaters, for a location average of $625 in its opening weekend.[1][10][11]

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November 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Fresno State professor calls Barbara Bush "amazing racist …

A Fresno State professor called former first lady Barbara Bush an amazing racist who raised a war criminal, and expressed no concern that she could be fired or reprimanded for her outspokenness on social media. Randa Jarrar, a professor in Fresno States Department of English, expressed her displeasure with the Bush family within an hour after the official announcement that Mrs. Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92. Barbara Bush was a generous and smart and amazing racist who, along with her husband, raised a war criminal, Jarrar wrote on Twitter. F— outta here with your nice words. Fresno State professor Randa Jarrar went on a twitter rant that lasted more than 5 hours. And it started with this tweet, criticizing the late first lady Barbara Bush. Twitter screen shot Jarrars tweet generated more than 2,000 replies back to her, with many upset at her and tagging Fresno State and University President Joseph Castro in their comments. Jarrar, who in her Twitter messages describes herself as an Arab-American and a Muslim-American woman, goes on to maintain that she is a tenured professor and makes $100,000 a year. I will never be fired, Jarrar tweeted. In a separate tweet, she wrote: If you’d like to know what it’s like to be an Arab American Muslim American woman with some clout online expressing an opinion, look at the racists going crazy in my mentions right now. Jarrar even encouraged those of Twitter to reach out to Fresno State and to Castro, offering up their Twitter handles. What I love about being an American professor is my right to free speech, and what I love about Fresno State is that I always feel protected and at home here, Jarrar wrote. GO BULLDOGS! Randa Jarrar said she’s a tenured professor at Fresno State and can’t be fired. She encouraged those who were upset at her to reach out to the university and Fresno State president Joseph Castro Twitter screen shot By around 10:21 p.m., Jarrar made her Twitter account private. The Fresno Bee took screen shots of her tweets when the account was public. Jarrar also changed her Twitter bio, removing the titles of her books and instead writing, “Currently on leave from Fresno State. This is my private account and represents my opinions.” The university confirmed Jarrar has been on leave all semester. On Amazon, negative reviews for her books began to appear, apparently in reaction to her tweets. Fresno State, roughly three hours after Jarrars initial tweet about Bush, sent out a statement by Castro that addressed the outspoken professor. On behalf of Fresno State, I extend my deepest condolences to the Bush family on the loss of our former First Lady, Barbara Bush, Castro says in the statement. We share the deep concerns expressed by others over the personal comments made today by professor Randa Jarrar, a professor in the English department at Fresno State. Her statements were made as a private citizen, not as a representative at Fresno State. Castro also added: Professor Jarrars expressed personal views and commentary are obviously contrary to the core values of our University, which include respect and empathy for individuals with divergent points of view, and a sincere commitment to mutual understanding and progress.” The university is still looking into the matter, according to spokeswoman Patti Waid. Messages left with Jarrar were not immediately returned. In a statement, an official from a civil liberties organization that specializes in campus free speech defended Jarrar’s right to express herself. “Fresno State correctly acknowledges that Jarrar’s tweets were made as a private citizen,” said Adam Steinbaugh, senior program officer for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. “As such, and because they touched upon a matter of public concern, Jarrar’s tweets are unquestionably protected speech under the First Amendment and Fresno State has no power to censor, punish or terminate Jarrar for them.” According to Jarrar’s bio on the Fresno State’s website, Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. She grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and she moved to the U.S. after the Gulf War. She received the 2014 Lannan Residency Program fellowship award, which is given for excellence in poetry writing, essays and scholarly articles as well as social justice activism. Fresno State professor Randa Jarrar interacts with someone who flags her account with U.S. Homeland security. Twitter screen shot One person who responded to Jarrar tagged U.S. Homeland Security and noted that the professor lives in Fresno. To which Jarrar tweeted back: LOL. @DHSgov has been watching me for like 25 years, bro. Our kids grew up together. But nice try. Jarrar was active on Twitter for at least five hours Tuesday, responding to some critics, retweeting others who also were critical of the Bush family and taunting those who attacked her physical appearance. She also provided a telephone number as if it was her contact number. But the listed number ended up going to a suicide/crisis line. A handful of Twitter users tweeted messages of support as the negative comments were pouring in. Jasmine Leiva, a Fresno State graduate, called Jarrar “a gem” and said Fresno State was “lucky to have her.” “She cares about her students, is wildly talented, and told no lies,” Leiva wrote.

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November 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Jerusalems Peace Players – USAID Stories

When Liraz and Jinan get together, they playfully tease each other and erupt in giggles while sharing news about each others lives. When apart, they constantly text each other. In short, Liraz, a 16-year-old Israeli, and Jinan, a 14-year-old Palestinian, are typical teenage girls.

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November 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Jerusalem Municipality – The Official Website

Disclaimers: This site is designed to be user utility, and material contained therein is not binding and does not replace the original study. The municipality is not liable for any errors, tampering, omission, addition, defect and binding version is the original version found in the municipality.

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November 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Anne Frank’s diary: mystery pages contained ‘dirty jokes …

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November 19, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Israel – HISTORY

Contents Israel is small country in the Middle East, about the size of New Jersey, located on the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea and bordered by Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. The nation of Israelwith a population of more than 8 million people, most of them Jewishhas many important archaeological and religious sites considered sacred by Jews, Muslims and Christians alike, and a complex history with periods of peace and conflict. Much of what scholars know about Israels ancient history comes from the Hebrew Bible. According to the text, Israels origins can be traced back to Abraham, who is considered the father of both Judaism (through his son Isaac) and Islam (through his son Ishmael). Abrahams descendants were thought to be enslaved by the Egyptians for hundreds of years before settling in Canaan, which is approximately the region of modern-day Israel. The word Israel comes from Abrahams grandson, Jacob, who was renamed Israel by the Hebrew God in the Bible. King David ruled the region around 1000 B.C. His son, who became King Solomon, is credited with building the first holy temple in ancient Jerusalem. In about 931 B.C., the area was divided into two kingdoms: Israel in the north and Judah in the south. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Thanks for watching!Visit Website Thanks for watching!Visit Website Around 722 B.C., the Assyrians invaded and destroyed the northern kingdom of Israel. In 568 B.C., the Babylonians conquered Jerusalem and destroyed the first temple, which was replaced by a second temple in about 516 B.C. For the next several centuries, the land of modern-day Israel was conquered and ruled by various groups, including the Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians, Mamelukes, Islamists and others. From 1517 to 1917, Israel, along with much of the Middle East, was ruled by the Ottoman Empire. But World War I dramatically altered the geopolitical landscape in the Middle East. In 1917, at the height of the war, British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour submitted a letter of intent supporting the establishment of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. The British government hoped that the formal declarationknown thereafter as the Balfour Declarationwould encourage support for the Allies in World War I. When World War I ended in 1918 with an Allied victory, the 400-year Ottoman Empire rule ended, and Great Britain took control over what became known as Palestine (modern-day Israel, Palestine and Jordan). The Balfour Declaration and the British mandate over Palestine were approved by the League of Nations in 1922. Arabs vehemently opposed the Balfour Declaration, concerned that a Jewish homeland would mean the subjugation of Arab Palestinians. The British controlled Palestine until Israel, in the years following the end of World War II, became an independent state in 1947. Throughout Israels long history, tensions between Jews and Arab Muslims have existed. The complex hostility between the two groups dates all the way back to ancient times when they both populated the area and deemed it holy. Both Jews and Muslims consider the city of Jerusalem sacred. It contains the Temple Mount, which includes the holy sites al-Aqsa Mosque, the Western Wall, the Dome of the Rock and more. Much of the conflict in recent years has centered around who is occupying the following areas: In the late 19th and early 20th century, an organized religious and political movement known as Zionism emerged among Jews. Zionists wanted to reestablish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Massive numbers of Jews immigrated to the ancient holy land and built settlements. Between 1882 and 1903, about 35,000 Jews relocated to Palestine. Another 40,000 settled in the area between 1904 and 1914. Many Jews living in Europe and elsewhere, fearing persecution during the Nazi reign, found refuge in Palestine and embraced Zionism. After the Holocaust and World War II ended, members of the Zionist movement primarily focused on creating an independent Jewish state. Arabs in Palestine resisted the Zionism movement, and tensions between the two groups continue. An Arab nationalist movement developed as a result. The United Nations approved a plan to partition Palestine into a Jewish and Arab state in 1947, but the Arabs rejected it. In May 1948, Israel was officially declared an independent state with David Ben-Gurion, the head of the Jewish Agency, as the prime minister. While this historic event seemed to be a victory for Jews, it also marked the beginning of more violence with the Arabs. Following the announcement of an independent Israel, five Arab nationsEgypt, Jordan, Iraq, Syria, and Lebanonimmediately invaded the region in what became known as the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Civil war broke out throughout all of Israel, but a cease-fire agreement was reached in 1949. As part of the temporary armistice agreement, the West Bank became part of Jordan, and the Gaza Strip became Egyptian territory. Numerous wars and acts of violence between Arabs and Jews have ensued since the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Some of these include: Clashes between Israelis and Palestinians are still commonplace. Key territories of land are divided, but some are claimed by both groups. For instance, they both cite Jerusalem as their capital. Both groups blame each other for terror attacks that kill civilians. While Israel doesnt officially recognize Palestine as a state, more than 135 UN member nations do. Several countries have pushed for more peace agreements in recent years. Many have suggested a two-state solution but acknowledge that Israelis and Palestinians are unlikely to settle on borders. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has supported the two-state solution but has felt pressure to change his stance. Netanyahu has also been accused of encouraging Jewish settlements in Palestinian areas while still backing a two-state solution. The United States is one of Israels closest allies. In a visit to Israel in May 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump urged Netanyahu to embrace peace agreements with Palestinians. While Israel has been plagued by unpredictable war and violence in the past, many national leaders and citizens are hoping for a secure, stable nation in the future. Sources: History of Ancient Israel: Oxford Research Encyclopedias. Creation of Israel, 1948: Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State. The Arab-Israeli War of 1948: Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State. History of Israel: Key events: BBC. Israel: The World Factbook: U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Immigration to Israel: The Second Aliyah (1904 1914): Jewish Virtual Library. Trump Comes to Israel Citing a Palestinian Deal as Crucial: The New York Times. Palestine: Growing Recognition: Al Jazeera. Mandatory Palestine: What It Was and Why It Matters: TIME.

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November 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

Curricula | Define Curricula at Dictionary.com

[kuh-rik-yuh-luhm] ExamplesWord Origin Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018 C19: from Latin: course, from currere to run Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 1824, from Modern Latin transferred use of classical Latin curriculum “a running, course, career” (also “a fast chariot, racing car”), from currere (see current (adj.)). Used in English as a Latin word since 1630s at Scottish universities. Online Etymology Dictionary, 2010 Douglas Harper

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October 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

The New York Times – Search

EU Leaders to Seek Cyber Sanctions, Press Asia for Action: Draft Statements The European Union should agree a sanctions law to target computer hackers by early next year, the bloc’s leaders are set to say on Thursday and will also seek a pledge from Russia and China to help stop cyber attacks, internal EU documents show.

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October 17, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed

VIDEO: Home Depot Hands Out Free Plywood to Residents in Hurricane Florence’s Path

A Home Depot in Wilmington, North Carolina, is passing out plywood free of charge to residents who are in Hurricane Florence’s path as the region braces for the Category 2 storm’s impact.

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September 13, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Israel  Comments Closed


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