Archive for the ‘Palestine’ Category

Palestines Economic Outlook- Spring 2016 – World Bank

The latest MENA Economic Monitor Report – Spring 2016, expects Palestines growth to remain unchanged at 3.3 % in 2016, although its economic outlook continues to be highly uncertain.

An economic recovery is underway following the 2014 recession caused by the Gaza war. The economy is estimated to have expanded by 3.3 % in 2015. Reconstruction efforts have provided a boost to the Gaza economy where real GDP growth is estimated to have reached 5 % in 2015, driven by strong growth in the construction sector as well as retail and wholesale trade. However, growth in the West Bank slowed in 2015 with real GDP expanding by 2.8 %, which is 2.5 %age points lower than in 2014. The slowdown is mainly attributed to a significant decline in foreign aid in addition to the Israeli decision to suspend the transfer of Palestinian taxes in early 2015, resulting in a severe liquidity squeeze. Unemployment continues to be stubbornly high at 26 %. In the West Bank, it amounted to 19 % by the end of 2015 while it was twice as high in Gaza. Unemployment is exceptionally high amongst Palestinian youth, particularly in Gaza where more than half of those aged between 15 and 29 are out of work. Inflation remains low and stable, at 1.4 % in 2015.

The Palestinian Authority’s (PA) fiscal deficit (before grants) narrowed in 2015 to 11.7 % of GDP. Expenditure growth was high, exceeding 6 % (in nominal NIS terms), mainly driven by spending on transfers and goods and services. However, it was offset by strong revenue growth of 9 %. Aid in 2015 dropped by almost 30 % relative to the previous year and was less than needed to cover the deficit, leading to a U5$650 million financing gap. The PA resorted to accumulation of arrears and domestic borrowing to cover the gap.

The current account deficit (excluding official transfers) is estimated to have declined to 11.3 % of GDP in 2015 due to a narrowing of the trade deficit. Preliminary estimates indicate that the trade deficit reached 36.6 % of GDP in 2015, which is 3 %age points lower than its 2014 level. This was mainly driven by a decline in imports from Israel as growth slowed in the West Bank.

The economic outlook continues to be highly uncertain. Under a baseline scenario that assumes no change to the Israeli restrictions on trade, movement and access, growth is expected to remain unchanged in 2016 at 3.3 %. In the West Bank, growth is projected at 2.8 % assuming that the ongoing clashes do not escalate. Growth in Gaza is projected at 5 %, as reconstruction advances. If reconstruction continues at its current pace, Gaza’s GDP will not rebound to its prewar levels until 2018. In the medium term, overall growth in the West Bank and Gaza is expected to hover around 3.5 %, leading to stagnant per capita incomes and rising unemployment.

Significant downside risks remain that could significantly worsen the economic outlook. First, the pace of reconstruction and recovery in Gaza has been slower than anticipated and despite some acceleration in recent months, additional setbacks are possible. Second, the outcome in the West Bank may be worse than expected if tensions continue to escalate. This environment may significantly weaken consumer and investor confidence, and hence, negatively impact economic activity. Finally, the failure to form a unified government for West Bank and Gaza has created two parallel regulatory frameworks: one in the West Bank and another one in Gaza. All this could potentially have a negative impact on the business climate

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Palestines Economic Outlook- Spring 2016 – World Bank

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November 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

The History of Palestine

History of Palestine

Zionism arrived in Palestine in the late 19th as a colonialist movement motivated by national impulses.

The colonisation of Palestine fitted well the interests and policies of the British Empire on the eve of the First World War.

With the backing of Britain, the colonisation project expanded, and became a solid presence on the land after the war and with the establishment of the British mandate in Palestine (which lasted between 1918 and 1948).

While this consolidation took place, the indigenous society underwent, like other societies in the rest of the Arab world, a steady process of establishing a national identity.

But with one difference. While the rest of the Arab world was shaping its political identity through the struggle against European colonialism, in Palestine nationalism meant asserting your collective identity against both an exploitative British colonialism and expansionist Zionism.

Thus, the conflict with Zionism was an additional burden. The pro-Zionist policy of the British mandate there naturally strained the relationship between Britain and the local Palestinian society.

This climaxed in a revolt in 1936 against both London and the expanding Zionist colonisation project.

The revolt, which lasted for three years, failed to sway the British mandate from a policy it had already decided upon in 1917. The British foreign secretary, Lord Balfour, had promised the Zionist leaders that Britain would help the movement to build a homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine.

The number of Jews coming into the country increased by the day – although even at that point, during the 1930s, the Jews were just a quarter of the population, possessing 4 percent of the land.

As resistance to colonialism strengthened, the Zionist leadership became convinced that only through a total expulsion of the Palestinians would they be able to create a state of their own.

From its early inception and up to the 1930s, Zionist thinkers propagated the need to ethnically cleanse the indigenous population of Palestine if the dream of a Jewish state were to come true.

The preparation for implementing these two goals of statehood and ethnic supremacy accelerated after the Second World War.

The Zionist leadership defined 80 percent of Palestine (Israel today without the West Bank) as the space for the future state.

This was an area in which one million Palestinians lived next to 600,000 Jews.

The idea was to uproot as many Palestinians as possible. From March 1948 until the end of that year the plan was implemented despite the attempt by some Arab states to oppose it, which failed. Some 750,000 Palestinians were expelled, 531 villages were destroyed and 11 urban neighbourhoods demolished.

Half of Palestines population was uprooted and half of its villages destroyed. The state of Israel was established in over 80 percent of Palestine, turning Palestinian villages into Jewish settlements and recreation parks, but allowing a small number of Palestinian to remain citizens in it.

The June 1967 war allowed Israel to take the remaining 20 percent of Palestine.

This seizure defeated in a way the ethnic ideology of the Zionist movement. Israel encompassed 100 percent of Palestine, but the state incorporated a large number of Palestinians, the people who Zionists made such an effort to expel in 1948.

The fact that Israel was let off easily in 1948, and not condemned for the ethnic cleansing it committed, encouraged it to ethnically cleanse a further 300,000 Palestinians from the West Bank and the Gaza strip.

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The History of Palestine

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UCLA will host a Students for Justice in Palestine conference …

The chancellor espouses the values of inclusion and the need for mutual respect. However, this conference is a closed one, meaning only those who have been verified and vouched for can attend. A public university should not allow any group to implement a litmus test for event participation on its campus based on an attendees beliefs, religion, or national origin.

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UCLA will host a Students for Justice in Palestine conference …

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November 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine – HISTORY

Contents

Palestine is a small region of landroughly 2,400 square milesthat has played a prominent role in the ancient and modern history of the Middle East. Violent attempts to control land have defined much of the history of Palestine, making it the site of constant political conflict. Arab people who call this territory home are known as Palestinians, and the people of Palestine have a strong desire to create a free and independent state in a contested region of the world thats considered sacred by many groups.

Until 1948, Palestine typically referred to the geographic region located between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River. Arab people who call this territory home are known as Palestinians. Much of this land is now considered present-day Israel.

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Today, Palestine theoretically includes the West Bank (a territory that divides modern-day Israel and Jordan) and the Gaza Strip (land bordering modern-day Israel and Egypt). However, control over this region is a complex and evolving situation. The borders arent formally set, and many areas claimed by Palestinians have been occupied by Israelis for years.

More than 135 United Nations member countries recognize Palestine as an independent state, but Israel and some other countries, including the United States, dont make this distinction.

Thanks for watching!Visit Website

Thanks for watching!Visit Website

Scholars believe the name Palestine originally comes from the word Philistia, which refers to the Philistines who occupied part of the region in the 12th century B.C.

Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians, Mamelukes and Islamists.

From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region.

When World War I ended in 1918, the British took control of Palestine. The League of Nations issued a British mandate for Palestinea document that gave Britain the responsibility of establishing a Jewish national homeland in Palestinewhich went into effect in 1923.

In 1947, the United Nations proposed a plan to partition Palestine into two sections: an independent Jewish state and an independent Arab state, with Jerusalem as internationalized territory.

Jewish leaders accepted the plan, but many Palestinian Arabs vehemently opposed it.

Arab groups argued that they represented the majority of the population in certain regions and should be granted more territory. They began to form volunteer armies throughout Palestine.

In May 1948, less than a year after the Partition of Palestine was introduced, Britain withdrew from Palestine and Israel became an independent state.

Estimates suggest between 700,000 and 900,000 Palestinians fled or were forced to leave their homes.

Almost immediately, war broke out between Jews and Arabs in the region. The 1948 Arab-Israeli War involved Israel and five Arab nationsJordan, Iraq, Syria, Egypt and Lebanon.

This conflict marked the beginning of years of violent conflict between Arabs and Israelis.

In 1964, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was formed to create a platform for establishing a plan for a Palestinian state within Israel.

The PLO also emerged as a response to Zionism, an organized movement to reestablish a Jewish homeland in Israel. In the years after its inception, the PLO became associated with extremism and violence.

In 1969, the well-known Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat became the Chairman of the PLO and held that title until he died in 2004.

Israel attacked Egypt, Jordan and Syria between June 5 and June 10, 1967. This brief conflict, which became known as The Six-Day War, resulted in major land gains for Israel.

After the war, Israel took control of the Gaza Strip, West Bank, Sinai Peninsula (a desert region situated between the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea) and Golan Heights (a rocky plateau located between Syria and modern-day Israel).The outcome of this war led to more fighting that continued for decades.

In 1987, the First Intifada broke out. This conflict was fueled by Israeli occupation of Gaza and the West Bank. Palestinian militia groups revolted, and hundreds of people were killed.

A subsequent peace process, known as the Oslo Peace Accords, was proposed to end the ongoing violence.

The first Oslo Accord (Oslo I) created a timetable for a Middle East peace process and a plan for an interim Palestinian government in parts of Gaza and the West Bank. The agreement was signed in 1993 and witnessed by Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

Arafat returned to Gaza in 1994 after being exiled for 27 years. He headed up the newly-formed Palestinian Authority.In 1995, Oslo II called for a complete withdrawal of Israeli troops from parts of the West Bank and other areas. It also set a schedule for Palestinian Legislative Council elections.

In September 2000, the Second Palestinian Intifada began. One of the triggers for the violence was when Ariel Sharon, who would later become Israels Prime Minister, visited al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. Many Palestinians felt this was an offensive move, and they protested.

Riots, suicide bombings and other attacks subsequently broke out, putting an end to the promising peace process.This period of violence between Palestinians and Israelis lasted nearly five years. In 2005, the Israeli army withdrew from Gaza.

In 2006, Hamas, a Sunni Islamist militant group, won the Palestinian legislative elections.

That same year, fighting between Hamas and Fatah, the political group that controlled the PLO, ensued. In 2007, Hamas defeated Fatah in a battle for Gaza.

Many countries consider Hamas to be a terrorist organization. The group has carried out suicide bombings and repeatedly called for the destruction of Israel.

Hamas and Israel fought each other in several bloody wars, including Operation Cast Lead in December 2008, Operation Pillar of Defense in November 2012 and Operation Protective Edge in July 2014.

In April 2014, Hamas and Fatah agreed to a deal that would form a unified national Palestinian government.

Palestinians are still fighting for an official state thats formally recognized by all countries.

Although Palestinians occupy key areas of land, including the West Bank and the Gaza strip, large populations of Israelis continue to settle in these locations. Many international rights groups consider these settlements illegal, the borders arent clearly defined, and persistent conflict continues to be the norm.

In May 2017, leaders of Hamas presented a document that proposed the formation of a Palestinian state using the 1967 defined borders, with Jerusalem as its capital. However, the group refused to recognize Israel as a state, and the Israeli government promptly rejected the plan.

While so much of Palestines history has involved bloodshed, displacement, and instability, many world leaders are working toward a resolution that will result in peace throughout the region.

Palestine. Ancient History Encyclopedia.What is Palestine and Palestinians? Israel Science and Technology Directory.Everything you need to know about Israel-Palestine. Vox.com.Map: The countries that recognize Palestine as a state. Washington Post.UN Partition Plan. BBC News.The Palestinian Liberation Organisation. The History Learning Site.Timeline: History of a Revolution. Al Jazeera.Hamas accepts Palestinian state with 1967 borders. Al Jazeera.Palestine Liberation Organization. Oxford Islamic Studies Online.Oslo Accords Fast Facts. CNN.Profile: Hamas Palestinian movement. BBC News.

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Palestine – HISTORY

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October 9, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine, TX – Palestine, Texas Map & Directions – MapQuest

Palestine (/plstin/ pal-e-steen) is a city in Anderson County, Texas, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 17,598, and 18,458 in the 2009 estimate. It is the county seat of Anderson County and is situated in East Texas. Palestine was named for Palestine, Illinois, by Daniel Parker.The largest employer is the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, which employs more than 3,900. Another 1,600 work at two Wal-Mart distribution centers. Other significant employers include a thriving medical and healthcare sector that tends to the large population of retirees.Palestine entered the news in February 2003, as one of the East Texas towns that received much of the debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, where seven astronauts were killed, including the first Israeli astronaut. Palestine is also home to the NASA Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (renamed after the shuttle crash), which has flown 1700 high-altitude balloons for universities and research agencies.

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Palestine, TX – Palestine, Texas Map & Directions – MapQuest

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September 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Palestine – 2018 (with Photos …

2018 TripAdvisor LLC All rights reserved.

* TripAdvisor LLC is not a booking agent and does not charge any service fees to users of our site… (more)

TripAdvisor LLC is not responsible for content on external web sites. Taxes, fees not included for deals content.

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THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Palestine – 2018 (with Photos …

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August 18, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine Collection: Joe Sacco, Edward W. Said …

Sacco uses the comic book format to its fullest extent, creating bold perspectives that any photojournalist would envy.- Utne Reader

Sacco is a pioneer.- Journal of Palestinian Studies

Based on his research, interviews, and personal experiences in Palastinian Occupied Territories in 1991 and 92, [Palestine] takes you there and gives you a first-hand account of the atrocities and suffering in the conflict with Israel. He gives you a close up visual rendering of the physical and emotional conditions of the people, who struggle daily for survival… Sacco has rendered the terrible conditions of life into a compelling and sympathetic artistic documentary. It is sad, but most good stories are sad… Whats better, his drawing is detailed and realistic, very approachable and interesting.- American in Auckland

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Palestine Collection: Joe Sacco, Edward W. Said …

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August 16, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Birzeit University

A talk with one of Palestines leading childrens literature authors, Dr. Sonia Nimer

Literary experts, voracious readers, and professors from Birzeit University sat down with one of Palestines leading childrens literature authors, Dr. Sonia Nimer, whos also an associate professor of philosophy and cultural studies at Birzeit, on May 19, 2018.

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Birzeit University

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July 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine – definition of Palestine by The Free Dictionary

Sir John tells of many different ways of getting to Palestine, and relates wonderful stories about the places to be passed through.

When Sir John reaches Palestine he has very much to say of the wonders to be seen there.

Although Sir John begins his book as a guide to Palestine, he tells of many other lands also, and of the wonder there.

Nay, by St Mary, brother Brian, you must not think you are now in Palestine, predominating over heathen Turks and infidel Saracens; we islanders love not blows, save those of holy Church, who chasteneth whom she loveth.

I would soon have beat him into courtesy,” observed Brian; “I am accustomed to deal with such spirits: Our Turkish you shall soon be judge; and if the purity of her complexion, and the majestic, yet soft expression of a mild blue eye, do not chase from your memory the black-tressed girls of Palestine, ay, or the houris of old Mahound’s paradise, I am an infidel, and no true son of the church.

Men say his bones lie bleaching in the fields of Palestine.

The practiced knights from Palestine made holyday sport of carving the awkward men-at- arms into chops and steaks.

There the companions of his fall, o’rewhelm’d With Floods and Whirlwinds of tempestuous fire, He soon discerns, and weltring by his side One next himself in power, and next in crime, Long after known in PALESTINE, and nam’d BEELZEBUB.

Next came one Who mourn’d in earnest, when the Captive Ark Maim’d his brute Image, head and hands lopt off In his own Temple, on the grunsel edge, Where he fell flat, and sham’d his Worshipers: DAGON his Name, Sea Monster, upward Man And downward Fish: yet had his Temple high Rear’d in AZOTUS, dreaded through the Coast Of PALESTINE, in GATH and ASCALON, And ACCARON and GAZA’s frontier bounds.

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Palestine – definition of Palestine by The Free Dictionary

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Palestines Economic Outlook- Spring 2016 – World Bank

The latest MENA Economic Monitor Report – Spring 2016, expects Palestines growth to remain unchanged at 3.3 % in 2016, although its economic outlook continues to be highly uncertain. An economic recovery is underway following the 2014 recession caused by the Gaza war. The economy is estimated to have expanded by 3.3 % in 2015. Reconstruction efforts have provided a boost to the Gaza economy where real GDP growth is estimated to have reached 5 % in 2015, driven by strong growth in the construction sector as well as retail and wholesale trade. However, growth in the West Bank slowed in 2015 with real GDP expanding by 2.8 %, which is 2.5 %age points lower than in 2014. The slowdown is mainly attributed to a significant decline in foreign aid in addition to the Israeli decision to suspend the transfer of Palestinian taxes in early 2015, resulting in a severe liquidity squeeze. Unemployment continues to be stubbornly high at 26 %. In the West Bank, it amounted to 19 % by the end of 2015 while it was twice as high in Gaza. Unemployment is exceptionally high amongst Palestinian youth, particularly in Gaza where more than half of those aged between 15 and 29 are out of work. Inflation remains low and stable, at 1.4 % in 2015. The Palestinian Authority’s (PA) fiscal deficit (before grants) narrowed in 2015 to 11.7 % of GDP. Expenditure growth was high, exceeding 6 % (in nominal NIS terms), mainly driven by spending on transfers and goods and services. However, it was offset by strong revenue growth of 9 %. Aid in 2015 dropped by almost 30 % relative to the previous year and was less than needed to cover the deficit, leading to a U5$650 million financing gap. The PA resorted to accumulation of arrears and domestic borrowing to cover the gap. The current account deficit (excluding official transfers) is estimated to have declined to 11.3 % of GDP in 2015 due to a narrowing of the trade deficit. Preliminary estimates indicate that the trade deficit reached 36.6 % of GDP in 2015, which is 3 %age points lower than its 2014 level. This was mainly driven by a decline in imports from Israel as growth slowed in the West Bank. The economic outlook continues to be highly uncertain. Under a baseline scenario that assumes no change to the Israeli restrictions on trade, movement and access, growth is expected to remain unchanged in 2016 at 3.3 %. In the West Bank, growth is projected at 2.8 % assuming that the ongoing clashes do not escalate. Growth in Gaza is projected at 5 %, as reconstruction advances. If reconstruction continues at its current pace, Gaza’s GDP will not rebound to its prewar levels until 2018. In the medium term, overall growth in the West Bank and Gaza is expected to hover around 3.5 %, leading to stagnant per capita incomes and rising unemployment. Significant downside risks remain that could significantly worsen the economic outlook. First, the pace of reconstruction and recovery in Gaza has been slower than anticipated and despite some acceleration in recent months, additional setbacks are possible. Second, the outcome in the West Bank may be worse than expected if tensions continue to escalate. This environment may significantly weaken consumer and investor confidence, and hence, negatively impact economic activity. Finally, the failure to form a unified government for West Bank and Gaza has created two parallel regulatory frameworks: one in the West Bank and another one in Gaza. All this could potentially have a negative impact on the business climate

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November 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

The History of Palestine

History of Palestine Zionism arrived in Palestine in the late 19th as a colonialist movement motivated by national impulses. The colonisation of Palestine fitted well the interests and policies of the British Empire on the eve of the First World War. With the backing of Britain, the colonisation project expanded, and became a solid presence on the land after the war and with the establishment of the British mandate in Palestine (which lasted between 1918 and 1948). While this consolidation took place, the indigenous society underwent, like other societies in the rest of the Arab world, a steady process of establishing a national identity. But with one difference. While the rest of the Arab world was shaping its political identity through the struggle against European colonialism, in Palestine nationalism meant asserting your collective identity against both an exploitative British colonialism and expansionist Zionism. Thus, the conflict with Zionism was an additional burden. The pro-Zionist policy of the British mandate there naturally strained the relationship between Britain and the local Palestinian society. This climaxed in a revolt in 1936 against both London and the expanding Zionist colonisation project. The revolt, which lasted for three years, failed to sway the British mandate from a policy it had already decided upon in 1917. The British foreign secretary, Lord Balfour, had promised the Zionist leaders that Britain would help the movement to build a homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine. The number of Jews coming into the country increased by the day – although even at that point, during the 1930s, the Jews were just a quarter of the population, possessing 4 percent of the land. As resistance to colonialism strengthened, the Zionist leadership became convinced that only through a total expulsion of the Palestinians would they be able to create a state of their own. From its early inception and up to the 1930s, Zionist thinkers propagated the need to ethnically cleanse the indigenous population of Palestine if the dream of a Jewish state were to come true. The preparation for implementing these two goals of statehood and ethnic supremacy accelerated after the Second World War. The Zionist leadership defined 80 percent of Palestine (Israel today without the West Bank) as the space for the future state. This was an area in which one million Palestinians lived next to 600,000 Jews. The idea was to uproot as many Palestinians as possible. From March 1948 until the end of that year the plan was implemented despite the attempt by some Arab states to oppose it, which failed. Some 750,000 Palestinians were expelled, 531 villages were destroyed and 11 urban neighbourhoods demolished. Half of Palestines population was uprooted and half of its villages destroyed. The state of Israel was established in over 80 percent of Palestine, turning Palestinian villages into Jewish settlements and recreation parks, but allowing a small number of Palestinian to remain citizens in it. The June 1967 war allowed Israel to take the remaining 20 percent of Palestine. This seizure defeated in a way the ethnic ideology of the Zionist movement. Israel encompassed 100 percent of Palestine, but the state incorporated a large number of Palestinians, the people who Zionists made such an effort to expel in 1948. The fact that Israel was let off easily in 1948, and not condemned for the ethnic cleansing it committed, encouraged it to ethnically cleanse a further 300,000 Palestinians from the West Bank and the Gaza strip.

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November 16, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

UCLA will host a Students for Justice in Palestine conference …

The chancellor espouses the values of inclusion and the need for mutual respect. However, this conference is a closed one, meaning only those who have been verified and vouched for can attend. A public university should not allow any group to implement a litmus test for event participation on its campus based on an attendees beliefs, religion, or national origin.

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November 15, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine – HISTORY

Contents Palestine is a small region of landroughly 2,400 square milesthat has played a prominent role in the ancient and modern history of the Middle East. Violent attempts to control land have defined much of the history of Palestine, making it the site of constant political conflict. Arab people who call this territory home are known as Palestinians, and the people of Palestine have a strong desire to create a free and independent state in a contested region of the world thats considered sacred by many groups. Until 1948, Palestine typically referred to the geographic region located between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River. Arab people who call this territory home are known as Palestinians. Much of this land is now considered present-day Israel. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Today, Palestine theoretically includes the West Bank (a territory that divides modern-day Israel and Jordan) and the Gaza Strip (land bordering modern-day Israel and Egypt). However, control over this region is a complex and evolving situation. The borders arent formally set, and many areas claimed by Palestinians have been occupied by Israelis for years. More than 135 United Nations member countries recognize Palestine as an independent state, but Israel and some other countries, including the United States, dont make this distinction. Thanks for watching!Visit Website Thanks for watching!Visit Website Scholars believe the name Palestine originally comes from the word Philistia, which refers to the Philistines who occupied part of the region in the 12th century B.C. Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians, Mamelukes and Islamists. From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region. When World War I ended in 1918, the British took control of Palestine. The League of Nations issued a British mandate for Palestinea document that gave Britain the responsibility of establishing a Jewish national homeland in Palestinewhich went into effect in 1923. In 1947, the United Nations proposed a plan to partition Palestine into two sections: an independent Jewish state and an independent Arab state, with Jerusalem as internationalized territory. Jewish leaders accepted the plan, but many Palestinian Arabs vehemently opposed it. Arab groups argued that they represented the majority of the population in certain regions and should be granted more territory. They began to form volunteer armies throughout Palestine. In May 1948, less than a year after the Partition of Palestine was introduced, Britain withdrew from Palestine and Israel became an independent state. Estimates suggest between 700,000 and 900,000 Palestinians fled or were forced to leave their homes. Almost immediately, war broke out between Jews and Arabs in the region. The 1948 Arab-Israeli War involved Israel and five Arab nationsJordan, Iraq, Syria, Egypt and Lebanon. This conflict marked the beginning of years of violent conflict between Arabs and Israelis. In 1964, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was formed to create a platform for establishing a plan for a Palestinian state within Israel. The PLO also emerged as a response to Zionism, an organized movement to reestablish a Jewish homeland in Israel. In the years after its inception, the PLO became associated with extremism and violence. In 1969, the well-known Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat became the Chairman of the PLO and held that title until he died in 2004. Israel attacked Egypt, Jordan and Syria between June 5 and June 10, 1967. This brief conflict, which became known as The Six-Day War, resulted in major land gains for Israel. After the war, Israel took control of the Gaza Strip, West Bank, Sinai Peninsula (a desert region situated between the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea) and Golan Heights (a rocky plateau located between Syria and modern-day Israel).The outcome of this war led to more fighting that continued for decades. In 1987, the First Intifada broke out. This conflict was fueled by Israeli occupation of Gaza and the West Bank. Palestinian militia groups revolted, and hundreds of people were killed. A subsequent peace process, known as the Oslo Peace Accords, was proposed to end the ongoing violence. The first Oslo Accord (Oslo I) created a timetable for a Middle East peace process and a plan for an interim Palestinian government in parts of Gaza and the West Bank. The agreement was signed in 1993 and witnessed by Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. Arafat returned to Gaza in 1994 after being exiled for 27 years. He headed up the newly-formed Palestinian Authority.In 1995, Oslo II called for a complete withdrawal of Israeli troops from parts of the West Bank and other areas. It also set a schedule for Palestinian Legislative Council elections. In September 2000, the Second Palestinian Intifada began. One of the triggers for the violence was when Ariel Sharon, who would later become Israels Prime Minister, visited al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. Many Palestinians felt this was an offensive move, and they protested. Riots, suicide bombings and other attacks subsequently broke out, putting an end to the promising peace process.This period of violence between Palestinians and Israelis lasted nearly five years. In 2005, the Israeli army withdrew from Gaza. In 2006, Hamas, a Sunni Islamist militant group, won the Palestinian legislative elections. That same year, fighting between Hamas and Fatah, the political group that controlled the PLO, ensued. In 2007, Hamas defeated Fatah in a battle for Gaza. Many countries consider Hamas to be a terrorist organization. The group has carried out suicide bombings and repeatedly called for the destruction of Israel. Hamas and Israel fought each other in several bloody wars, including Operation Cast Lead in December 2008, Operation Pillar of Defense in November 2012 and Operation Protective Edge in July 2014. In April 2014, Hamas and Fatah agreed to a deal that would form a unified national Palestinian government. Palestinians are still fighting for an official state thats formally recognized by all countries. Although Palestinians occupy key areas of land, including the West Bank and the Gaza strip, large populations of Israelis continue to settle in these locations. Many international rights groups consider these settlements illegal, the borders arent clearly defined, and persistent conflict continues to be the norm. In May 2017, leaders of Hamas presented a document that proposed the formation of a Palestinian state using the 1967 defined borders, with Jerusalem as its capital. However, the group refused to recognize Israel as a state, and the Israeli government promptly rejected the plan. While so much of Palestines history has involved bloodshed, displacement, and instability, many world leaders are working toward a resolution that will result in peace throughout the region. Palestine. Ancient History Encyclopedia.What is Palestine and Palestinians? Israel Science and Technology Directory.Everything you need to know about Israel-Palestine. Vox.com.Map: The countries that recognize Palestine as a state. Washington Post.UN Partition Plan. BBC News.The Palestinian Liberation Organisation. The History Learning Site.Timeline: History of a Revolution. Al Jazeera.Hamas accepts Palestinian state with 1967 borders. Al Jazeera.Palestine Liberation Organization. Oxford Islamic Studies Online.Oslo Accords Fast Facts. CNN.Profile: Hamas Palestinian movement. BBC News.

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October 9, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine, TX – Palestine, Texas Map & Directions – MapQuest

Palestine (/plstin/ pal-e-steen) is a city in Anderson County, Texas, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 17,598, and 18,458 in the 2009 estimate. It is the county seat of Anderson County and is situated in East Texas. Palestine was named for Palestine, Illinois, by Daniel Parker.The largest employer is the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, which employs more than 3,900. Another 1,600 work at two Wal-Mart distribution centers. Other significant employers include a thriving medical and healthcare sector that tends to the large population of retirees.Palestine entered the news in February 2003, as one of the East Texas towns that received much of the debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, where seven astronauts were killed, including the first Israeli astronaut. Palestine is also home to the NASA Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (renamed after the shuttle crash), which has flown 1700 high-altitude balloons for universities and research agencies.

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September 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Palestine – 2018 (with Photos …

2018 TripAdvisor LLC All rights reserved. * TripAdvisor LLC is not a booking agent and does not charge any service fees to users of our site… (more) TripAdvisor LLC is not responsible for content on external web sites. Taxes, fees not included for deals content.

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August 18, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine Collection: Joe Sacco, Edward W. Said …

Sacco uses the comic book format to its fullest extent, creating bold perspectives that any photojournalist would envy.- Utne Reader Sacco is a pioneer.- Journal of Palestinian Studies Based on his research, interviews, and personal experiences in Palastinian Occupied Territories in 1991 and 92, [Palestine] takes you there and gives you a first-hand account of the atrocities and suffering in the conflict with Israel. He gives you a close up visual rendering of the physical and emotional conditions of the people, who struggle daily for survival… Sacco has rendered the terrible conditions of life into a compelling and sympathetic artistic documentary. It is sad, but most good stories are sad… Whats better, his drawing is detailed and realistic, very approachable and interesting.- American in Auckland

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August 16, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Birzeit University

A talk with one of Palestines leading childrens literature authors, Dr. Sonia Nimer Literary experts, voracious readers, and professors from Birzeit University sat down with one of Palestines leading childrens literature authors, Dr. Sonia Nimer, whos also an associate professor of philosophy and cultural studies at Birzeit, on May 19, 2018. More

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July 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed

Palestine – definition of Palestine by The Free Dictionary

Sir John tells of many different ways of getting to Palestine, and relates wonderful stories about the places to be passed through. When Sir John reaches Palestine he has very much to say of the wonders to be seen there. Although Sir John begins his book as a guide to Palestine, he tells of many other lands also, and of the wonder there. Nay, by St Mary, brother Brian, you must not think you are now in Palestine, predominating over heathen Turks and infidel Saracens; we islanders love not blows, save those of holy Church, who chasteneth whom she loveth. I would soon have beat him into courtesy,” observed Brian; “I am accustomed to deal with such spirits: Our Turkish you shall soon be judge; and if the purity of her complexion, and the majestic, yet soft expression of a mild blue eye, do not chase from your memory the black-tressed girls of Palestine, ay, or the houris of old Mahound’s paradise, I am an infidel, and no true son of the church. Men say his bones lie bleaching in the fields of Palestine. The practiced knights from Palestine made holyday sport of carving the awkward men-at- arms into chops and steaks. There the companions of his fall, o’rewhelm’d With Floods and Whirlwinds of tempestuous fire, He soon discerns, and weltring by his side One next himself in power, and next in crime, Long after known in PALESTINE, and nam’d BEELZEBUB. Next came one Who mourn’d in earnest, when the Captive Ark Maim’d his brute Image, head and hands lopt off In his own Temple, on the grunsel edge, Where he fell flat, and sham’d his Worshipers: DAGON his Name, Sea Monster, upward Man And downward Fish: yet had his Temple high Rear’d in AZOTUS, dreaded through the Coast Of PALESTINE, in GATH and ASCALON, And ACCARON and GAZA’s frontier bounds.

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July 5, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Palestine  Comments Closed


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