Archive for the ‘Shoah’ Category

Shoah – Barnes & Noble

Shoah

Shoah is an astonishing film on a number of levels, starting with its own existence — a documentary on a subject so horrendous, and horrific, that few potential filmgoers really want to think much about it, or the events related within. But Jewish-French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann took the plunge, head-first into his subject, in the hope that the audience would follow for 570 minutes. And as it turned out, Lanzmann’s extreme approach to filmmaking was precisely the correct one to take in dealing with his subject, the Nazi extermination of Europe’s Jews from 1938 through 1945. At first, in its opening minutes, the documentary seems to be shaping up as a relentless parade of interviews, all done in the subjects’ original languages and translated as audio live in front of the camera, as well as on-screen. But Shoah is a lot more than a succession of talk in multiple languages. Rather, Lanzmann did what one only wishes the Stuart Schulberg documentary Nuremberg (1947) could have done — he brings us and many of his subjects (including some low-level perpetrators) to the sites of the crimes in question, so that we perceive the dimensions and settings when they tell of the vile acts of murder and desecration they were obliged to commit, or which were committed upon them or those around them (including family members — in a quietly horrific moment, one survivor, recalls being forced to carry out the orders to hide a graveyard, and tells of finding the bodies of his own family in one layer of corpses). What’s more, the calm of the talk, and the detachment brought about by the need for translation, has the eerie effect of making the nature of the film — which is definitely not short of striking visuals in support of the interviews — much more enveloping than one could possibly imagine it could ever be. Indeed, by taking a broad approach over a huge canvas, but keeping the moment-to-moment emotional intensity in check, Lanzmann ends up making the unthinkable into a manageable subject for purposes of his film, and delivers a movie that accomplishes the seemingly impossible. And in the process, gradually, one begins to comprehend the unthinkable in dimensions that those present, victims and participants alike — based on the evidence of the survivors before us — must have accepted at the time, which goes some way to explaining the seemingly unanswerable, of how the catastophic events at the film’s center could have occurred. The sad answer, as one realizes about an eighth of the way through the movie, is that it happened in stages, and little steps taken in isolation, the latter being the key element — most of the participants (though certainly not the planners or the major overseers) never realized precisely the dimensions of the horror in which they were complicit, or to which they were witness. Lanzmann’s movie ends up presenting a revelatory account of the “how” behind the greatest international social horror of the twentieth century — the why is better left to historians, social philosophers, and theologians.

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Shoah | Define Shoah at Dictionary.com

or Shoah

[shoh-uh]

ExamplesWord Origin

From Hebrew

Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018

literally: destruction

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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Shoah – Movie Reviews – Rotten Tomatoes

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IFC Center – Shoah

Friday, December 24 – Thursday, January 6, 2011

New 35mm print Special 25th Anniversary presentation

The best documentary of all time. Time Out New York

Lanzmanns monumental examination of the Holocaust grew out of a concern that the genocide perpetrated only 40 years earlier was already retreating into the mists of time, that atrocity was becoming sanitized as History. His massive achievementat once epic and intimate, immediate and definitiveis a triumph of form and content that revealed hidden truths while rewriting the rules of documentary filmmaking. Now a quarter-century old, SHOAH remains nothing less than essential.

I consider SHOAH to be the greatest documentary about contemporary history ever made, bar none, and by far the greatest film Ive ever seen about the Holocaust. Marcel Ophls

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IFC Center – Shoah

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About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

The Visual History Archive is an online portal from USC Shoah Foundation that allows users to search through and view 55,000 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides that have been catalogued and indexed at the Institute. These testimonies were conducted in 64 countries and in 42 languages.

Since April 2013, the Visual History Archive has expanded to include a collection of 86 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Conducted in two countries (U.S.A. and Rwanda), and two languages (English and Kinyarwanda), the initial collection of Rwandan testimonies was accomplished in collaboration with Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial, with additional support provided by IBUKA.

Since February 2014, 30 audiovisual testimonies of survivors of the 1937-38 Nanjing Massacre have been integrated into the VHA. These testimonies are in Mandarin and were conducted in Nanjing, China, through a partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall.

Testimonies from survivors and witnesses to the Armenian Genocide were integrated into the Visual History Archive in April 2015, the centennial of that historic event. For this collection the USC Shoah Foundation partnered with the late Dr. J. Michael Hagopian who filmed all the interviews, his wife Antoinette and the Armenian Film Foundation.

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About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

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Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

“Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah”

Claude Lanzmann, the French journalist and director of the landmark 1985 Holocaust documentary Shoah, died in Paris on Thursday at age 92.

Claude Lanzmann died at his home. He had been very, very weak for several days, a spokeswoman for publishing house Gallimard told AFP.

The Four Sisters, a four-part docu-series about four Jewish Holocaust survivors, was just released in France this week.

Also Read: For 25th Anniversary, IFC to Re-Release ‘Shoah’

The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925 and fought in the resistance as a teenager.

In the 1950s, he plunged into a long career in journalism, mostly with Simone de Beauvoirs journal Les Temps Modernes. He took over as chief editor following her death in 1986.

Lanzmanns move into filmmaking grew out of his journalism, first with 1973s Why Israel? that was based on a series of interviews on French TV.

Also Read: 10 Documentary Shorts Make Oscar Shortlist

But he is best remembered for the nine-and-a-half-hour Shoah, named for the French term for the Holocaust, which gathered extensive interviews with survivors and witnesses of Nazi death camps in Poland, as well as horrifying images of the atrocities.

He began work on Shoah in 1974, and gathered more than 350 hours of footage some of which was later used in subsequent film projects.

Halfway through the year, we’ve already lost a number of stars across Hollywood. Here’s a list of some of the notable celebrities and industry professionals in film, TV, music and sports who have passed away so far in 2018.

Jon Paul Steuer

Steuer, a former child actor who starred in Star Trek: The Next Generation, and most recently under the stage name Jonny Jewels for the rock band P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., died on Jan. 1. He was 33.

Mark Tenser

Tenser, president and CEO of B-Movie studio Crown International Pictures, died on Jan. 1. At his request, his age was not disclosed.

Frank Buxton

Buxton, a writer and director best known for his work on The Odd Couple and Happy Days, died on Jan. 2. He was 87.

Donnelly Rhodes

Canadian actor Donnelly Rhodes, who played chief medical officer Dr. Sherman Cottle on the Battlestar Galactica reboot, died on Jan. 8. He was 80.

John Thompson

Thompson, a major action film producer and head of production at Millennium Films, died on Jan. 9 after a battle with leukemia. He was 71.

“Fast” Eddie Clark

Motrhead guitarist Fast Eddie Clarke died on Jan. 10 at the age of 67 after being admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. He was the last living member of the band’s 1976-1982 lineup.

Dolores O’Riordan

The lead singer of Irish rock group The Cranberries, known for hits like “Linger,” “Dreams” and “Zombie,” died on Jan. 15 at age 46. She died suddenly while recording in London.

Hugh Wilson

Wilson, director of the film comedies Police Academy and The First Wives Club and creator of the hit TV series WKRP In Cincinnati, died on Jan. 16. He was 74.

Simon Shelton

The British actor who portrayed Tinky Winky on “Teletubbies,” Simon Shelton – who also went by the name Simon Barnes – died on January 17. He was 52.

Peter Wyngarde

Wyngarde, the cult British actor who served as Mike Myers inspiration for Austin Powers, died on Jan. 18. He was 90.

Dorothy Malone

Dorothy Malone, a glamour queen of Old Hollywood who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for 1956s Written on the Wind and starred in “Peyton Place” and “Basic Instinct,” died on Jan. 19 of natural causes. She was 92.

Olivia Cole

Cole, the Emmy-winning star of the miniseries “Roots,” died on Jan. 19 at her home inSan Miguel de Allende, Mexico. She was 75.

Fredo Santana

Santana, a Chicago rapper who came up with his cousin Chief Keef, died on Jan. 20. No cause of death was immediately revealed, but Santana was hospitalized in October with kidney and liver failure. He was 27.

Connie Sawyer

Sawyer, a late-blooming actress who starred in “When Harry Met Sally” and “Pineapple Express,” died on Jan. 22. She was 105, and the oldest working member of the Screen Actors Guild.

Lari White

The country singer known for her songs “Now I Know” and “That’s My Baby,” as well as an actress who appeared in “Cast Away” and “No Regrets,” died on Jan. 23 following a battle with cancer. She was 52.

Ursula K. Le Guin

The acclaimed fantasy and science fiction writer, whose works include “Tales From Earthsea” and “Lathe of Heaven,” died in her home in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 23. She was 88.

Joel Taylor

Taylor, a star of the Discovery Channel reality show “Storm Chasers,” died on Jan. 23. He was 38.

Ezra Swerdlow

Swerdlow, a New York-based film producer of “The First Wives Club” and with additional credits on “Spaceballs,” “Alien 3,” “Tootsie” and more, died of complications from pancreatic cancer and ALS in Boston on Jan. 23. He was 64.

Mark E. Smith

The lead singer of the prolific British post-punk band The Fall, died on Jan. 24 in his home. He was 60.

John Morris

Morris, a composer who worked on “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein” and many other Mel Brooks movies, died on Jan. 25. He was 91.

Mark Salling

Actor Mark Salling, known for playing Puck on “Glee,” was found dead on Jan. 30 near a riverbed in Sunland, California.Sallings death came as he awaited sentencing in March after pleading guilty last October to possession of child pornography. The actor was 35.

Louis Zorich

Actor Louis Zorich, star of “Mad About You” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” died on Jan. 30. He had been married to “Moonstruck” star Olympia Dukakis since 1962. He was 93.

Ann Gillis

Actress Ann Gillis, a former child star during the Golden Age of Hollywood and who was featured in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died on Jan. 31. She was 90.

Rasual Butler

Former NBA star Rasual Butler was killed in a car crash on Jan. 31. He was 38.

Dennis Edwards

Edwards, the lead singer of the Motown soul group The Temptations between1968 and 1984, died on Feb. 2 just one day before his 75th birthday.

John Mahoney

Actor John Mahoney, who played Martin Crane on “Frasier” and also starred in “Moonstruck” and “Tin Men,” died on Feb. 4. He was 77.

Mickey Jones

Jones, an actor known for roles in “Total Recall” and “Sling Blade,” died on Feb. 7 following a “long illness.” He was 76.

Jill Messick

Messick, a veteran studio executive, producer and the former manager to actress and activist Rose McGowan, took her own life on Feb. 8. Messick’s family issued a devastating statement blaming, “our new culture of unlimited information sharing and a willingness toaccept statement as fact, specifically citing the fight between Rose McGowan and Harvey Weinstein that also ensnared Messick. She was 50.

Reg E. Cathey

Cathey, the Emmy-winning actor known for his work on “The Wire” and “House of Cards,” died on February 9. He was 59.

John Gavin

Gavin, an actor who starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Spartacus,” died on February 9. He was 86.

Jhann Jhannsson

Jhannsson, an acclaimed, Oscar-nominated and emerging Icelandic film composer known for his work on “Sicario,” “Arrival” and “The Theory of Everything,” died on February 9. He was 48.

Vic Damone

Damone, a singer known for his baritone crooning and for his work on classic films like 1957’s “An Affair to Remember,” died on February 11. He was 89.

Daryle Singletary

The Georgia-born country singer known for his songs “I Let Her Lie” and “Amen Kind of Love” died on February 12. He was 46.

Barbara Alston

Singer Barbara Alston, a member of the ’60s girl group The Crystals who sang on the hit song “Then He Kissed Me,” died on Feb. 16 from complications from the flu. She was 74.

Bruce Margolis

Fox studio executive and TV producer Bruce Margolis, best known for work on “Star” and overseeing “24,” “Prison Break” and “Bones,” died after a battle with cancer on February 16. He was 64.

Billy Graham

The Rev. Billy Graham, a Christian preacher and spiritual adviser to presidents going back to Harry Truman and an icon of American religious life and TV, died on Feb. 21. He was 99.

Emma Chambers

Actress Emma Chambers, who starred in “Notting Hill” and the BBC’s “The Vicar of Dibley,” died on Feb. 21 of natural causes. She was 53.

Bud Luckey

Luckey, an Oscar-nominated animator who designed Woody from Pixar’s Toy Story and voiced Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh, died on Feb. 24. He was 83.

Lewis Gilbert

Gilbert, an Oscar-nominated British director of Alfie and three James Bond movies, died on Feb. 23. He was 97.

Sridevi

Bollywood actress Sridevi Kapoor, also known as just Sridevi, died on Feb. 24. She had appeared in over 150 films in Bollywood. She was 54.

Benjamin Melniker

Melniker, an executive at MGM who had been with the company since 1939, as well as most recently a producer on “Justice League,” died on Feb. 26. He was 104.

Harry J. Ufland

Harry Ufland (right), an agent-turned producer and who was a long-time collaborator with Martin Scorsese on films including “The Last Temptation of Christ,” died in March after suffering from brain cancer. He was 81.

Barry Crimmins

Crimmins, a legendary comedian on the Boston comedy circuit and political advocate for victims of childhood sexual abuse, died on March 1. Weeks before his death Crimmins disclosed a cancer diagnosis. He died beside his wife and filmmaker Bobcat Goldthwaite, who made a documentary on Crimmins titled “Call Me Lucky.” Crimmins was 64.

David Ogden Stiers

The Emmy-nominated actor who playedMajor Charles Emerson Winchester III on “M.A.S.H.” diedof cancer on March 3. He was 75.

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Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

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Claude Lanzmann, director of Holocaust documentary ‘Shoah …

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PARIS French director Claude Lanzmann, whose 9-hour masterpiece “Shoah” bore unflinching witness to the Holocaust through the testimonies of Jewish victims, German executioners and Polish bystanders, has died at the age of 92.

Gallimard, the publishing house for Lanzmann’s autobiography, said he died Thursday morning in Paris. It gave no further details.

The power of “Shoah,” filmed in the 1970s during Lanzmann’s trips to the barren Polish landscapes where the slaughter of Jews was planned and executed, was in viewing the Holocaust as an event in the present, rather than as history. It contained no archival footage, no musical score just the landscape, trains and recounted memories.

Lanzmann was 59 when the movie, his second, came out in 1985. It defined the Holocaust for those who saw it, and defined him as a filmmaker.

“I knew that the subject of the film would be death itself. Death rather than survival,” Lanzmann wrote in the autobiography. “For 12 years I tried to stare relentlessly into the black sun of the Shoah.”

“Claude Lanzmann’s cinematic work left an indelible mark on the collective memory, and shaped the consciousness of the Holocaust of viewers around the world, in these and other generations,” said Avner Shalev, chairman of Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial.

“His departure from us now, along with our recent separation from many Holocaust survivors, marks the end of an era.”

“Shoah” was nearly universally praised. Roger Ebert called it “one of the noblest films ever made” and Time Out and The Guardian were among those ranking it the greatest documentary of all time. The Polish government was a notable dissenter, which dismissed the film as “anti-Polish propaganda.” (but later allowed “Shoah” to be aired in Poland).

In 2013, nearly three decades later, Lanzmann revisited the Holocaust with “The Last of the Unjust,” focusing on his interviews in 1975 with a Vienna rabbi who was the last “elder” of the Theresienstadt ghetto, which was used by the Nazis to fool visitors into believing that the Jews were being treated humanely.

His final work, a series of interviews with four Holocaust survivors stitched together into a single 4 hour film, was released in French theaters Wednesday. But even before that, Lanzmann showed his breadth with the 2017 documentary, “Napalm,” which narrated his visit to North Korea in the late 1950s, including him recounting his unconsummated affair with a Red Cross nurse in the country.

“The cinematic work of Claude Lanzmann shows how much art contributes to the construction of our collective memory, giving individual resonance to each story,” said Audrey Azoulay, a former French culture minister and current director general of UNESCO.

Lanzmann was born Nov. 27, 1925, in Paris, the child of French Jews. After his mother left in 1934 and the war broke out, Claude and his two siblings moved to a farm where their father timed his children as they practiced escaping to a shelter he had dug.

Lanzmann ultimately joined the Resistance as a Communist and became intellectually enamored with Jean-Paul Sartre, whose “Anti-Semite and Jew” formed the philosophical underpinning of what would later be his life’s work.

Lanzmann joined Sartre’s circle and ended up having an affair with Simone de Beauvoir, Sartre’s companion who was 17 years older than the young acolyte. Lanzmann left for Israel and moved in with Beauvoir when he returned, from 1952 to 1959, according to “The Patagonia Hare,” his autobiography. Sartre, Lanzmann’s hero, became a constant in their life together.

“So I was an opportunist ‘on the make’ you say. But she was beautiful. My attraction to her was genuine,” he once told Beauvoir’s biographer. Long after their affair ended, Beauvoir provided much of the financial support for “Shoah.”

Lanzmann tinkered in politics and journalism, working periodically for the journal France Dimanche, taking on freelance assignments. He joined Sartre in signing the Manifesto for the 121, calling on French soldiers to refuse fighting in Algeria, and was prosecuted.

In 1968, he did television reporting on the Israeli Army in the Sinai Peninsula, which led to his first film: “Israel, Why.”

Beauvoir, writing about Lanzmann in her memoir “Force of Circumstance” described him as someone who “seemed to be carrying the weight of a whole ancestral experience on his shoulders.”

It was this weight that ultimately led a vagabond intellectual to examine the defining event of 20th century Judaism, obsessively tracking down those who were closest to the dead. “The film would have to take up the ultimate challenge; take the place of the non-existent images of death in the gas chambers,” he wrote.

The film opens with Simon Srebnik, who as a 13-year-old Jewish detainee sang for the SS and fed their rabbits at the Chelmno concentration camp. Crediting a sweet voice with his survival, Srebnik performs the same songs for Lanzmann as he is rowed along the placid river that leads to the camp. Later, it is revealed that among Srebnik’s tasks was to dump bags filled crushed bones of Jews into the same waters.

He filmed Abraham Bomba at work in a Tel Aviv barbershop, describing how he cut women’s hair inside the gas chambers Treblinka. With periodic questions by Lanzmann, Bomba recounts how after each group of women was done, the barbers were asked to leave for a few minutes, the women were gassed and then the men returned to cut the hair of dozens more naked women accompanied by their children.

“This room is the last place where they went in alive and they will never go out alive again,” he said. “We just cut their hair to make them believe they’re getting a nice haircut.” The barber begged to stop when he recalled seeing the wife and sister of a friend come in, but Lanzmann prodded him to continue.

Lanzmann sometimes used secret cameras to record testimony, including that of Franz Suchomel, a former guard at Treblinka who pointed like a schoolteacher to a blueprint of the camp to show how bodies were disposed of, describing new gas chambers that could “finish off 3,000 people in two hours.” At one point during the interview, Lanzmann promised Suchomel that he would not be recorded.

One of the most harrowing interviews Lanzmann did was also among the briefest in “Shoah” Yitzhak Zuckerman, a leader of the Jewish resistance in Warsaw, who survived Treblinka and saw untold numbers of friends and comrades die. He told Lanzmann bitterly, “if you could lick my heart, it would poison you.”

At the film’s premier, the French journalist Jean Daniel told Lanzmann: “This justifies a life.”

Lanzmann is survived by his third wife, Dominique, and his daughter Angelique. His son Felix died last year.

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Claude Lanzmann Dead: Holocaust Documentary ‘Shoah …

3:10 AM PDT 7/5/2018byJordan Mintzer, Georg Szalai

Claude Lanzmann, the French director behind the landmark nine-and-a-half-hour Holocaust documentary Shoah, has died. He was 92.

A spokesperson for the Gallimard publishing house, which published his memoir, told The Hollywood Reporter on Thursday that Lanzmann died June 28 in a Paris hospital. No cause of death was given.

Released in 1985, Shoah considered one of the greatest films ever made about the Holocaust won the New York Film Critics Circle award for best nonfiction film and the BAFTA award for best documentary.

His other documentaries include Tsahal (1994), about the Israel Defense Forces; The Last of the Unjust (2013), about the last president of the Jewish Council in the Theresienstadt ghetto in the former Czechoslovakia; and Napalm (2017).

Lanzmann was honored at the 2013 Berlin International Film Festival with a Golden Bear for lifetime achievement.

Claude Lanzmann was one of the great documentarists,” Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick said in a statement. “With his depictions of inhumanity and violence, of anti-Semitism and its consequences, he created a new kind of cinematic and ethical exploration. We mourn the loss of an important personality of the political-intellectual life of our time.

In 2015, filmmaker Adam Benzine documented Lanzmann’s 12-year process in making Shoahwith a 40-minute documentary, Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah. It included never-before-seen outtakes from Lanzmann’s interviews with Holocaust survivors andreceived an Academy Award nomination for best short-subject documentary.

Lanzmann’s final project, The Four Sisters a four-part documentary series that was made for the Franco-German broadcaster Arte was released theatrically in France on the day before his death.

Composed of footage shot for Shoah but not used in the final movie, The Four Sisters consists of interviews with four women who survived the Holocaust. It premiered in the U.S. in October at the New York Film Festival and was acquired by Cohen Media Group, which will release it this year.

In the 1950s, Lanzmann lived with French writer and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir. He was married three times: to Judith Magre, a French actress; Angelika Schrobsdorff, a German writer and actress; and Dominique Petithory, a nutritionist.

In his 2012 autobiography, The Patagonian Hare: A Memoir, Lanzmann revealed about how he came up with the title for Shoah.

“How could there be a name for something that was utterly without precedent in the history of mankind? If it had been possible not to give the film a title, I would have done so,” he wrote. “The word ‘shoah’ occurred to me one night as self-evident because, not speaking Hebrew, I did not understand its meaning, which was another way of not naming it. But for those who speak Hebrew, ‘shoah’ is just as inadequate. The term occurs several times in the Bible. It means ‘catastrophe,’ ‘destruction,’ ‘annihilation’ For me, ‘shoah’ was a signifier with no signified, a brief, opaque utterance, an impenetrable, unbreakable word.”

Rhett Bartlett contributed to this report.

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Shoah director Claude Lanzmann dies aged 92 | Film | The …

Claude Lanzmann, the French film-maker and journalist who was best known for the exhaustive Holocaust documentary Shoah, has died aged 92. Lanzmanns family confirmed his death to Le Monde, though its cause has not been revealed.

The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925, and as a teenager fought in the resistance before studying philosophy at the Sorbonne after the war. After a period teaching in West Germany in the late 40s, he returned to France and, after meeting Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, he was invited to join the board of Les Temps Modernes, the influential journal they had founded in 1945. He embarked on a passionate relationship with de Beauvoir, 18 years his senior, and they lived together from 1952 to 1959. In 1986, Lanzmann became chief editor of Les Temps Modernes on de Beauvoirs death and remained in the post for the rest of his life.

As a journalist, Lanzmann fully engaged with the political ferment of the 1950s and 60s, writing lengthy and significant articles about Israel, North Korea and Tibet, and was one of the signatories of the Manifesto of the 121, denouncing French government actions in Algeria.

Lanzmanns film-making grew out of his journalistic and intellectual preoccupations. His first documentary Pourquoi Israel? (Why Israel?) began as a series of interviews he conducted for a French TV show; it was his attempt to answer the anti-colonialist broadsides of his fellow leftwing intellectuals and grapple with what he called the complex Israeli reality. It was released in 1973 as the country reached its 25th anniversary.

He began filming Shoah in 1974, filming interviews with death camp survivors all over the world. He told the Guardian he had resisted visiting the site of the Nazi camps until 1978. When I saw the village of Treblinka still existed, that people who were witnesses to everything still existed, that there was a normal train station, the bomb that I was exploded. I started to shoot. At one point, Lanzmann was attacked while attempting a covert interview, and was hospitalised for a month. With no archive footage, and originally planned as a two-hour film, the monumental 560-minute work emerged in 1985, before being screened in Israel a year later.

Shoahs impact was felt far and wide. Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, said: [Shoah] has been hailed by many as the greatest documentary of all time, but more importantly it made those who watched it a witness to the truth through survivor and perpetrator testimony. Lanzmann played a pivotal role in keeping the memory and truth of the Holocaust alive. Shoah was ground-breaking in the 1980s and still is to this day. The film and his work educated so many around the world and for that we owe him a great debt.

Lanzmann would later cull a number of feature-length films from the 350 hours of footage: including Sobibor, October 14, 1943, 4 p.m. about a partially successful uprising against the camp guards; The Karski Report, about a Polish resistance fighter who attempted to make the allied command aware of the horrific massacres occurring in Poland; and The Last of the Unjust, an interview with Benjamin Murmelstein, a rabbi who was one of the Jewish administrators of the Theresienstadt ghetto.

Lanzmanns final film, Napalm, which premiered at Cannes in 2017, drew on his earlier visit to North Korea as a young journalist, in which he revealed his brief affair with a North Korean nurse. He subsequently completed a four-part TV series, The Four Sisters, again examining the experiences of Holocaust survivors.

In 2011 Lanzmann was made grand officer of the Legion dHonneur, and in 2013 was awarded an honorary Golden Bear by the Berlin film festival.

Lanzmann was married three times: to actor Judith Magre (divorcing in 1971), German writer Angelika Schrobsdorff (divorcing in 1990), and epidemiologist Dominique Petithory (who he married in 1995). Lanzmann had two children, Angelique and Felix; the latter died aged 23 in 2017 from cancer.

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Shoah – Barnes & Noble

Shoah Shoah is an astonishing film on a number of levels, starting with its own existence — a documentary on a subject so horrendous, and horrific, that few potential filmgoers really want to think much about it, or the events related within. But Jewish-French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann took the plunge, head-first into his subject, in the hope that the audience would follow for 570 minutes. And as it turned out, Lanzmann’s extreme approach to filmmaking was precisely the correct one to take in dealing with his subject, the Nazi extermination of Europe’s Jews from 1938 through 1945. At first, in its opening minutes, the documentary seems to be shaping up as a relentless parade of interviews, all done in the subjects’ original languages and translated as audio live in front of the camera, as well as on-screen. But Shoah is a lot more than a succession of talk in multiple languages. Rather, Lanzmann did what one only wishes the Stuart Schulberg documentary Nuremberg (1947) could have done — he brings us and many of his subjects (including some low-level perpetrators) to the sites of the crimes in question, so that we perceive the dimensions and settings when they tell of the vile acts of murder and desecration they were obliged to commit, or which were committed upon them or those around them (including family members — in a quietly horrific moment, one survivor, recalls being forced to carry out the orders to hide a graveyard, and tells of finding the bodies of his own family in one layer of corpses). What’s more, the calm of the talk, and the detachment brought about by the need for translation, has the eerie effect of making the nature of the film — which is definitely not short of striking visuals in support of the interviews — much more enveloping than one could possibly imagine it could ever be. Indeed, by taking a broad approach over a huge canvas, but keeping the moment-to-moment emotional intensity in check, Lanzmann ends up making the unthinkable into a manageable subject for purposes of his film, and delivers a movie that accomplishes the seemingly impossible. And in the process, gradually, one begins to comprehend the unthinkable in dimensions that those present, victims and participants alike — based on the evidence of the survivors before us — must have accepted at the time, which goes some way to explaining the seemingly unanswerable, of how the catastophic events at the film’s center could have occurred. The sad answer, as one realizes about an eighth of the way through the movie, is that it happened in stages, and little steps taken in isolation, the latter being the key element — most of the participants (though certainly not the planners or the major overseers) never realized precisely the dimensions of the horror in which they were complicit, or to which they were witness. Lanzmann’s movie ends up presenting a revelatory account of the “how” behind the greatest international social horror of the twentieth century — the why is better left to historians, social philosophers, and theologians.

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September 13, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Shoah | Define Shoah at Dictionary.com

or Shoah [shoh-uh] ExamplesWord Origin From Hebrew Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018 literally: destruction Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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August 7, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Shoah – Movie Reviews – Rotten Tomatoes

The Tomatometer rating based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show. Fresh The Tomatometer is 60% or higher. Rotten The Tomatometer is 59% or lower. Certified Fresh Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics. Audience Score Percentage of users who rate a movie or TV show positively.

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IFC Center – Shoah

Friday, December 24 – Thursday, January 6, 2011 New 35mm print Special 25th Anniversary presentation The best documentary of all time. Time Out New York Lanzmanns monumental examination of the Holocaust grew out of a concern that the genocide perpetrated only 40 years earlier was already retreating into the mists of time, that atrocity was becoming sanitized as History. His massive achievementat once epic and intimate, immediate and definitiveis a triumph of form and content that revealed hidden truths while rewriting the rules of documentary filmmaking. Now a quarter-century old, SHOAH remains nothing less than essential. I consider SHOAH to be the greatest documentary about contemporary history ever made, bar none, and by far the greatest film Ive ever seen about the Holocaust. Marcel Ophls

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About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

The Visual History Archive is an online portal from USC Shoah Foundation that allows users to search through and view 55,000 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides that have been catalogued and indexed at the Institute. These testimonies were conducted in 64 countries and in 42 languages. Since April 2013, the Visual History Archive has expanded to include a collection of 86 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Conducted in two countries (U.S.A. and Rwanda), and two languages (English and Kinyarwanda), the initial collection of Rwandan testimonies was accomplished in collaboration with Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial, with additional support provided by IBUKA. Since February 2014, 30 audiovisual testimonies of survivors of the 1937-38 Nanjing Massacre have been integrated into the VHA. These testimonies are in Mandarin and were conducted in Nanjing, China, through a partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall. Testimonies from survivors and witnesses to the Armenian Genocide were integrated into the Visual History Archive in April 2015, the centennial of that historic event. For this collection the USC Shoah Foundation partnered with the late Dr. J. Michael Hagopian who filmed all the interviews, his wife Antoinette and the Armenian Film Foundation. Find out more about the Visual History Archive:

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July 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

“Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah” Claude Lanzmann, the French journalist and director of the landmark 1985 Holocaust documentary Shoah, died in Paris on Thursday at age 92. Claude Lanzmann died at his home. He had been very, very weak for several days, a spokeswoman for publishing house Gallimard told AFP. The Four Sisters, a four-part docu-series about four Jewish Holocaust survivors, was just released in France this week. Also Read: For 25th Anniversary, IFC to Re-Release ‘Shoah’ The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925 and fought in the resistance as a teenager. In the 1950s, he plunged into a long career in journalism, mostly with Simone de Beauvoirs journal Les Temps Modernes. He took over as chief editor following her death in 1986. Lanzmanns move into filmmaking grew out of his journalism, first with 1973s Why Israel? that was based on a series of interviews on French TV. Also Read: 10 Documentary Shorts Make Oscar Shortlist But he is best remembered for the nine-and-a-half-hour Shoah, named for the French term for the Holocaust, which gathered extensive interviews with survivors and witnesses of Nazi death camps in Poland, as well as horrifying images of the atrocities. He began work on Shoah in 1974, and gathered more than 350 hours of footage some of which was later used in subsequent film projects. Halfway through the year, we’ve already lost a number of stars across Hollywood. Here’s a list of some of the notable celebrities and industry professionals in film, TV, music and sports who have passed away so far in 2018. Jon Paul Steuer Steuer, a former child actor who starred in Star Trek: The Next Generation, and most recently under the stage name Jonny Jewels for the rock band P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., died on Jan. 1. He was 33. Mark Tenser Tenser, president and CEO of B-Movie studio Crown International Pictures, died on Jan. 1. At his request, his age was not disclosed. Frank Buxton Buxton, a writer and director best known for his work on The Odd Couple and Happy Days, died on Jan. 2. He was 87. Donnelly Rhodes Canadian actor Donnelly Rhodes, who played chief medical officer Dr. Sherman Cottle on the Battlestar Galactica reboot, died on Jan. 8. He was 80. John Thompson Thompson, a major action film producer and head of production at Millennium Films, died on Jan. 9 after a battle with leukemia. He was 71. “Fast” Eddie Clark Motrhead guitarist Fast Eddie Clarke died on Jan. 10 at the age of 67 after being admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. He was the last living member of the band’s 1976-1982 lineup. Dolores O’Riordan The lead singer of Irish rock group The Cranberries, known for hits like “Linger,” “Dreams” and “Zombie,” died on Jan. 15 at age 46. She died suddenly while recording in London. Hugh Wilson Wilson, director of the film comedies Police Academy and The First Wives Club and creator of the hit TV series WKRP In Cincinnati, died on Jan. 16. He was 74. Simon Shelton The British actor who portrayed Tinky Winky on “Teletubbies,” Simon Shelton – who also went by the name Simon Barnes – died on January 17. He was 52. Peter Wyngarde Wyngarde, the cult British actor who served as Mike Myers inspiration for Austin Powers, died on Jan. 18. He was 90. Dorothy Malone Dorothy Malone, a glamour queen of Old Hollywood who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for 1956s Written on the Wind and starred in “Peyton Place” and “Basic Instinct,” died on Jan. 19 of natural causes. She was 92. Olivia Cole Cole, the Emmy-winning star of the miniseries “Roots,” died on Jan. 19 at her home inSan Miguel de Allende, Mexico. She was 75. Fredo Santana Santana, a Chicago rapper who came up with his cousin Chief Keef, died on Jan. 20. No cause of death was immediately revealed, but Santana was hospitalized in October with kidney and liver failure. He was 27. Connie Sawyer Sawyer, a late-blooming actress who starred in “When Harry Met Sally” and “Pineapple Express,” died on Jan. 22. She was 105, and the oldest working member of the Screen Actors Guild. Lari White The country singer known for her songs “Now I Know” and “That’s My Baby,” as well as an actress who appeared in “Cast Away” and “No Regrets,” died on Jan. 23 following a battle with cancer. She was 52. Ursula K. Le Guin The acclaimed fantasy and science fiction writer, whose works include “Tales From Earthsea” and “Lathe of Heaven,” died in her home in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 23. She was 88. Joel Taylor Taylor, a star of the Discovery Channel reality show “Storm Chasers,” died on Jan. 23. He was 38. Ezra Swerdlow Swerdlow, a New York-based film producer of “The First Wives Club” and with additional credits on “Spaceballs,” “Alien 3,” “Tootsie” and more, died of complications from pancreatic cancer and ALS in Boston on Jan. 23. He was 64. Mark E. Smith The lead singer of the prolific British post-punk band The Fall, died on Jan. 24 in his home. He was 60. John Morris Morris, a composer who worked on “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein” and many other Mel Brooks movies, died on Jan. 25. He was 91. Mark Salling Actor Mark Salling, known for playing Puck on “Glee,” was found dead on Jan. 30 near a riverbed in Sunland, California.Sallings death came as he awaited sentencing in March after pleading guilty last October to possession of child pornography. The actor was 35. Louis Zorich Actor Louis Zorich, star of “Mad About You” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” died on Jan. 30. He had been married to “Moonstruck” star Olympia Dukakis since 1962. He was 93. Ann Gillis Actress Ann Gillis, a former child star during the Golden Age of Hollywood and who was featured in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died on Jan. 31. She was 90. Rasual Butler Former NBA star Rasual Butler was killed in a car crash on Jan. 31. He was 38. Dennis Edwards Edwards, the lead singer of the Motown soul group The Temptations between1968 and 1984, died on Feb. 2 just one day before his 75th birthday. John Mahoney Actor John Mahoney, who played Martin Crane on “Frasier” and also starred in “Moonstruck” and “Tin Men,” died on Feb. 4. He was 77. Mickey Jones Jones, an actor known for roles in “Total Recall” and “Sling Blade,” died on Feb. 7 following a “long illness.” He was 76. Jill Messick Messick, a veteran studio executive, producer and the former manager to actress and activist Rose McGowan, took her own life on Feb. 8. Messick’s family issued a devastating statement blaming, “our new culture of unlimited information sharing and a willingness toaccept statement as fact, specifically citing the fight between Rose McGowan and Harvey Weinstein that also ensnared Messick. She was 50. Reg E. Cathey Cathey, the Emmy-winning actor known for his work on “The Wire” and “House of Cards,” died on February 9. He was 59. John Gavin Gavin, an actor who starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Spartacus,” died on February 9. He was 86. Jhann Jhannsson Jhannsson, an acclaimed, Oscar-nominated and emerging Icelandic film composer known for his work on “Sicario,” “Arrival” and “The Theory of Everything,” died on February 9. He was 48. Vic Damone Damone, a singer known for his baritone crooning and for his work on classic films like 1957’s “An Affair to Remember,” died on February 11. He was 89. Daryle Singletary The Georgia-born country singer known for his songs “I Let Her Lie” and “Amen Kind of Love” died on February 12. He was 46. Barbara Alston Singer Barbara Alston, a member of the ’60s girl group The Crystals who sang on the hit song “Then He Kissed Me,” died on Feb. 16 from complications from the flu. She was 74. Bruce Margolis Fox studio executive and TV producer Bruce Margolis, best known for work on “Star” and overseeing “24,” “Prison Break” and “Bones,” died after a battle with cancer on February 16. He was 64. Billy Graham The Rev. Billy Graham, a Christian preacher and spiritual adviser to presidents going back to Harry Truman and an icon of American religious life and TV, died on Feb. 21. He was 99. Emma Chambers Actress Emma Chambers, who starred in “Notting Hill” and the BBC’s “The Vicar of Dibley,” died on Feb. 21 of natural causes. She was 53. Bud Luckey Luckey, an Oscar-nominated animator who designed Woody from Pixar’s Toy Story and voiced Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh, died on Feb. 24. He was 83. Lewis Gilbert Gilbert, an Oscar-nominated British director of Alfie and three James Bond movies, died on Feb. 23. He was 97. Sridevi Bollywood actress Sridevi Kapoor, also known as just Sridevi, died on Feb. 24. She had appeared in over 150 films in Bollywood. She was 54. Benjamin Melniker Melniker, an executive at MGM who had been with the company since 1939, as well as most recently a producer on “Justice League,” died on Feb. 26. He was 104. Harry J. Ufland Harry Ufland (right), an agent-turned producer and who was a long-time collaborator with Martin Scorsese on films including “The Last Temptation of Christ,” died in March after suffering from brain cancer. He was 81. Barry Crimmins Crimmins, a legendary comedian on the Boston comedy circuit and political advocate for victims of childhood sexual abuse, died on March 1. Weeks before his death Crimmins disclosed a cancer diagnosis. He died beside his wife and filmmaker Bobcat Goldthwaite, who made a documentary on Crimmins titled “Call Me Lucky.” Crimmins was 64. David Ogden Stiers The Emmy-nominated actor who playedMajor Charles Emerson Winchester III on “M.A.S.H.” diedof cancer on March 3. He was 75.

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July 8, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Claude Lanzmann, director of Holocaust documentary ‘Shoah …

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings. PARIS French director Claude Lanzmann, whose 9-hour masterpiece “Shoah” bore unflinching witness to the Holocaust through the testimonies of Jewish victims, German executioners and Polish bystanders, has died at the age of 92. Gallimard, the publishing house for Lanzmann’s autobiography, said he died Thursday morning in Paris. It gave no further details. The power of “Shoah,” filmed in the 1970s during Lanzmann’s trips to the barren Polish landscapes where the slaughter of Jews was planned and executed, was in viewing the Holocaust as an event in the present, rather than as history. It contained no archival footage, no musical score just the landscape, trains and recounted memories. Lanzmann was 59 when the movie, his second, came out in 1985. It defined the Holocaust for those who saw it, and defined him as a filmmaker. “I knew that the subject of the film would be death itself. Death rather than survival,” Lanzmann wrote in the autobiography. “For 12 years I tried to stare relentlessly into the black sun of the Shoah.” “Claude Lanzmann’s cinematic work left an indelible mark on the collective memory, and shaped the consciousness of the Holocaust of viewers around the world, in these and other generations,” said Avner Shalev, chairman of Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial. “His departure from us now, along with our recent separation from many Holocaust survivors, marks the end of an era.” “Shoah” was nearly universally praised. Roger Ebert called it “one of the noblest films ever made” and Time Out and The Guardian were among those ranking it the greatest documentary of all time. The Polish government was a notable dissenter, which dismissed the film as “anti-Polish propaganda.” (but later allowed “Shoah” to be aired in Poland). In 2013, nearly three decades later, Lanzmann revisited the Holocaust with “The Last of the Unjust,” focusing on his interviews in 1975 with a Vienna rabbi who was the last “elder” of the Theresienstadt ghetto, which was used by the Nazis to fool visitors into believing that the Jews were being treated humanely. His final work, a series of interviews with four Holocaust survivors stitched together into a single 4 hour film, was released in French theaters Wednesday. But even before that, Lanzmann showed his breadth with the 2017 documentary, “Napalm,” which narrated his visit to North Korea in the late 1950s, including him recounting his unconsummated affair with a Red Cross nurse in the country. “The cinematic work of Claude Lanzmann shows how much art contributes to the construction of our collective memory, giving individual resonance to each story,” said Audrey Azoulay, a former French culture minister and current director general of UNESCO. Lanzmann was born Nov. 27, 1925, in Paris, the child of French Jews. After his mother left in 1934 and the war broke out, Claude and his two siblings moved to a farm where their father timed his children as they practiced escaping to a shelter he had dug. Lanzmann ultimately joined the Resistance as a Communist and became intellectually enamored with Jean-Paul Sartre, whose “Anti-Semite and Jew” formed the philosophical underpinning of what would later be his life’s work. Lanzmann joined Sartre’s circle and ended up having an affair with Simone de Beauvoir, Sartre’s companion who was 17 years older than the young acolyte. Lanzmann left for Israel and moved in with Beauvoir when he returned, from 1952 to 1959, according to “The Patagonia Hare,” his autobiography. Sartre, Lanzmann’s hero, became a constant in their life together. “So I was an opportunist ‘on the make’ you say. But she was beautiful. My attraction to her was genuine,” he once told Beauvoir’s biographer. Long after their affair ended, Beauvoir provided much of the financial support for “Shoah.” Lanzmann tinkered in politics and journalism, working periodically for the journal France Dimanche, taking on freelance assignments. He joined Sartre in signing the Manifesto for the 121, calling on French soldiers to refuse fighting in Algeria, and was prosecuted. In 1968, he did television reporting on the Israeli Army in the Sinai Peninsula, which led to his first film: “Israel, Why.” Beauvoir, writing about Lanzmann in her memoir “Force of Circumstance” described him as someone who “seemed to be carrying the weight of a whole ancestral experience on his shoulders.” It was this weight that ultimately led a vagabond intellectual to examine the defining event of 20th century Judaism, obsessively tracking down those who were closest to the dead. “The film would have to take up the ultimate challenge; take the place of the non-existent images of death in the gas chambers,” he wrote. The film opens with Simon Srebnik, who as a 13-year-old Jewish detainee sang for the SS and fed their rabbits at the Chelmno concentration camp. Crediting a sweet voice with his survival, Srebnik performs the same songs for Lanzmann as he is rowed along the placid river that leads to the camp. Later, it is revealed that among Srebnik’s tasks was to dump bags filled crushed bones of Jews into the same waters. He filmed Abraham Bomba at work in a Tel Aviv barbershop, describing how he cut women’s hair inside the gas chambers Treblinka. With periodic questions by Lanzmann, Bomba recounts how after each group of women was done, the barbers were asked to leave for a few minutes, the women were gassed and then the men returned to cut the hair of dozens more naked women accompanied by their children. “This room is the last place where they went in alive and they will never go out alive again,” he said. “We just cut their hair to make them believe they’re getting a nice haircut.” The barber begged to stop when he recalled seeing the wife and sister of a friend come in, but Lanzmann prodded him to continue. Lanzmann sometimes used secret cameras to record testimony, including that of Franz Suchomel, a former guard at Treblinka who pointed like a schoolteacher to a blueprint of the camp to show how bodies were disposed of, describing new gas chambers that could “finish off 3,000 people in two hours.” At one point during the interview, Lanzmann promised Suchomel that he would not be recorded. One of the most harrowing interviews Lanzmann did was also among the briefest in “Shoah” Yitzhak Zuckerman, a leader of the Jewish resistance in Warsaw, who survived Treblinka and saw untold numbers of friends and comrades die. He told Lanzmann bitterly, “if you could lick my heart, it would poison you.” At the film’s premier, the French journalist Jean Daniel told Lanzmann: “This justifies a life.” Lanzmann is survived by his third wife, Dominique, and his daughter Angelique. His son Felix died last year.

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July 8, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Claude Lanzmann Dead: Holocaust Documentary ‘Shoah …

3:10 AM PDT 7/5/2018byJordan Mintzer, Georg Szalai Claude Lanzmann, the French director behind the landmark nine-and-a-half-hour Holocaust documentary Shoah, has died. He was 92. A spokesperson for the Gallimard publishing house, which published his memoir, told The Hollywood Reporter on Thursday that Lanzmann died June 28 in a Paris hospital. No cause of death was given. Released in 1985, Shoah considered one of the greatest films ever made about the Holocaust won the New York Film Critics Circle award for best nonfiction film and the BAFTA award for best documentary. His other documentaries include Tsahal (1994), about the Israel Defense Forces; The Last of the Unjust (2013), about the last president of the Jewish Council in the Theresienstadt ghetto in the former Czechoslovakia; and Napalm (2017). Lanzmann was honored at the 2013 Berlin International Film Festival with a Golden Bear for lifetime achievement. Claude Lanzmann was one of the great documentarists,” Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick said in a statement. “With his depictions of inhumanity and violence, of anti-Semitism and its consequences, he created a new kind of cinematic and ethical exploration. We mourn the loss of an important personality of the political-intellectual life of our time. In 2015, filmmaker Adam Benzine documented Lanzmann’s 12-year process in making Shoahwith a 40-minute documentary, Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah. It included never-before-seen outtakes from Lanzmann’s interviews with Holocaust survivors andreceived an Academy Award nomination for best short-subject documentary. Lanzmann’s final project, The Four Sisters a four-part documentary series that was made for the Franco-German broadcaster Arte was released theatrically in France on the day before his death. Composed of footage shot for Shoah but not used in the final movie, The Four Sisters consists of interviews with four women who survived the Holocaust. It premiered in the U.S. in October at the New York Film Festival and was acquired by Cohen Media Group, which will release it this year. In the 1950s, Lanzmann lived with French writer and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir. He was married three times: to Judith Magre, a French actress; Angelika Schrobsdorff, a German writer and actress; and Dominique Petithory, a nutritionist. In his 2012 autobiography, The Patagonian Hare: A Memoir, Lanzmann revealed about how he came up with the title for Shoah. “How could there be a name for something that was utterly without precedent in the history of mankind? If it had been possible not to give the film a title, I would have done so,” he wrote. “The word ‘shoah’ occurred to me one night as self-evident because, not speaking Hebrew, I did not understand its meaning, which was another way of not naming it. But for those who speak Hebrew, ‘shoah’ is just as inadequate. The term occurs several times in the Bible. It means ‘catastrophe,’ ‘destruction,’ ‘annihilation’ For me, ‘shoah’ was a signifier with no signified, a brief, opaque utterance, an impenetrable, unbreakable word.” Rhett Bartlett contributed to this report.

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July 8, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Shoah director Claude Lanzmann dies aged 92 | Film | The …

Claude Lanzmann, the French film-maker and journalist who was best known for the exhaustive Holocaust documentary Shoah, has died aged 92. Lanzmanns family confirmed his death to Le Monde, though its cause has not been revealed. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925, and as a teenager fought in the resistance before studying philosophy at the Sorbonne after the war. After a period teaching in West Germany in the late 40s, he returned to France and, after meeting Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, he was invited to join the board of Les Temps Modernes, the influential journal they had founded in 1945. He embarked on a passionate relationship with de Beauvoir, 18 years his senior, and they lived together from 1952 to 1959. In 1986, Lanzmann became chief editor of Les Temps Modernes on de Beauvoirs death and remained in the post for the rest of his life. As a journalist, Lanzmann fully engaged with the political ferment of the 1950s and 60s, writing lengthy and significant articles about Israel, North Korea and Tibet, and was one of the signatories of the Manifesto of the 121, denouncing French government actions in Algeria. Lanzmanns film-making grew out of his journalistic and intellectual preoccupations. His first documentary Pourquoi Israel? (Why Israel?) began as a series of interviews he conducted for a French TV show; it was his attempt to answer the anti-colonialist broadsides of his fellow leftwing intellectuals and grapple with what he called the complex Israeli reality. It was released in 1973 as the country reached its 25th anniversary. He began filming Shoah in 1974, filming interviews with death camp survivors all over the world. He told the Guardian he had resisted visiting the site of the Nazi camps until 1978. When I saw the village of Treblinka still existed, that people who were witnesses to everything still existed, that there was a normal train station, the bomb that I was exploded. I started to shoot. At one point, Lanzmann was attacked while attempting a covert interview, and was hospitalised for a month. With no archive footage, and originally planned as a two-hour film, the monumental 560-minute work emerged in 1985, before being screened in Israel a year later. Shoahs impact was felt far and wide. Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, said: [Shoah] has been hailed by many as the greatest documentary of all time, but more importantly it made those who watched it a witness to the truth through survivor and perpetrator testimony. Lanzmann played a pivotal role in keeping the memory and truth of the Holocaust alive. Shoah was ground-breaking in the 1980s and still is to this day. The film and his work educated so many around the world and for that we owe him a great debt. Lanzmann would later cull a number of feature-length films from the 350 hours of footage: including Sobibor, October 14, 1943, 4 p.m. about a partially successful uprising against the camp guards; The Karski Report, about a Polish resistance fighter who attempted to make the allied command aware of the horrific massacres occurring in Poland; and The Last of the Unjust, an interview with Benjamin Murmelstein, a rabbi who was one of the Jewish administrators of the Theresienstadt ghetto. Lanzmanns final film, Napalm, which premiered at Cannes in 2017, drew on his earlier visit to North Korea as a young journalist, in which he revealed his brief affair with a North Korean nurse. He subsequently completed a four-part TV series, The Four Sisters, again examining the experiences of Holocaust survivors. In 2011 Lanzmann was made grand officer of the Legion dHonneur, and in 2013 was awarded an honorary Golden Bear by the Berlin film festival. Lanzmann was married three times: to actor Judith Magre (divorcing in 1971), German writer Angelika Schrobsdorff (divorcing in 1990), and epidemiologist Dominique Petithory (who he married in 1995). Lanzmann had two children, Angelique and Felix; the latter died aged 23 in 2017 from cancer.

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