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SHOAH (1985). Condition: New Sealed DVD. Region: ALL, World Wide, it can be played at any DVD player. Subtitle: English, French, Korean, None (you can choose one or turn off subtitle). Cover has the f…

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All Dvds, cover and case included. Dvds look good with just a few light scratches. Dvds play like new. Dvd cover looks good but has a little sticker residue on the front as shown in the photos All ite…

Actor : William Lubtchansky. Director : Claude Lanzmann. Title : Shoah. About Oblivion Enterprises, Inc. DVDs in original pictorial plastic case. still in publisher’s shrinkwrap. never opened. Conditi…

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Actors: None. Studio: Criterion Collection. Playing side of disc is in nice, clean, lightly used but well kept condition. Over all a nice clean viewing copy. If the photo shows the booklet included th…

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Shoah DVD: DVDs & Blu-ray Discs | eBay

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Shoah | documentary film by Lanzmann [1985] | Britannica.com

documentary film by Lanzmann [1985]

THIS IS A DIRECTORY PAGE. Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic.

film was the stepping-stone to Shoah, his most-acclaimed work. After Israel, Why was released, the Foreign Ministry in Israel asked him to create a film on the Holocaust. The film consumed the next 11 years of his life. Perhaps the most-notable aspect of Shoah is that, in nine-and-a-half hours, there

Claude Lanzmanns Shoah (1985), for example, a nine-and-a-half-hour examination of the Nazi concentration camps, received limited theatrical distribution in many areas because of its length but still managed to reach wide audiences through the distribution markets provided by the growing cable television and videocassette industries. Ken Burnss

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Shoah | documentary film by Lanzmann [1985] | Britannica.com

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The European Holocaust | USC Shoah Foundation

USC Shoah Foundations collection of nearly 55,000 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors and witnesses amounts to the largest archive of its kind in the world, and it continues to grow.

Covering a wide-array of experiences and topics, the collection includes interviews with Jewish survivors, homosexual survivors, Jehovahs Witness survivors, liberators and liberation witnesses, political prisoners, rescuers and aid providers, Roma and Sinti (Gypsy) survivors, survivors of Eugenics policies, and war crimes trials participants.

The Institute recorded the vast majority of the Holocaust testimonies in the Visual History Archive during its formative years. Between 1994 and 1999, the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation now USC Shoah Foundation exceeded the goal of founder Steven Spielberg to collect 50,000 Holocaust interviews.

The Institute is now committed to expanding its Visual History Archive and becoming a digital repository for other audiovisual Holocaust survivor and witness testimonies.

Through a program called Preserving the Legacy, USC Shoah Foundation digitizes, indexes, and integrates into the Visual History Archive Holocaust testimony taken and owned by other museums and institutions to make them more accessible to scholars, students, educators, and the general public. Efforts are underway to collect as many as 3,000 new life stories in this fashion.

The Institute is also in the midst of a campaign to record at least 50 testimonies from the North Africa and Middle East region, where the Nazi regime had gained a foothold during World War II.

USC Shoah Foundation has also partnered with USC Institute for Creative Technologies and Conscience Display to conceive and design a cutting-edge technology called New Dimensions in Testimony, which enables people to interact with a projected image of a real Holocaust survivor, who responds to questions asked in real time.

With this endeavor, a handful of Holocaust survivors who have already sat before a camera for USC Shoah Foundations Visual History Archive are giving testimony again. This time, however, they sit before 50 cameras arranged in a rig to capture a three-dimensional recording of them telling their stories in a new way, by answering questions that people are most likely to ask. Funding for New Dimensions in Testimony was provided in part by Pears Foundation and Louis. F. Smith.

To support any of these ongoing projects, please contact Dornsife Advancement at (213) 740-4990 or advancement@dornsife.usc.edu.

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The European Holocaust | USC Shoah Foundation

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Shoah – Barnes & Noble

Shoah

Shoah is an astonishing film on a number of levels, starting with its own existence — a documentary on a subject so horrendous, and horrific, that few potential filmgoers really want to think much about it, or the events related within. But Jewish-French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann took the plunge, head-first into his subject, in the hope that the audience would follow for 570 minutes. And as it turned out, Lanzmann’s extreme approach to filmmaking was precisely the correct one to take in dealing with his subject, the Nazi extermination of Europe’s Jews from 1938 through 1945. At first, in its opening minutes, the documentary seems to be shaping up as a relentless parade of interviews, all done in the subjects’ original languages and translated as audio live in front of the camera, as well as on-screen. But Shoah is a lot more than a succession of talk in multiple languages. Rather, Lanzmann did what one only wishes the Stuart Schulberg documentary Nuremberg (1947) could have done — he brings us and many of his subjects (including some low-level perpetrators) to the sites of the crimes in question, so that we perceive the dimensions and settings when they tell of the vile acts of murder and desecration they were obliged to commit, or which were committed upon them or those around them (including family members — in a quietly horrific moment, one survivor, recalls being forced to carry out the orders to hide a graveyard, and tells of finding the bodies of his own family in one layer of corpses). What’s more, the calm of the talk, and the detachment brought about by the need for translation, has the eerie effect of making the nature of the film — which is definitely not short of striking visuals in support of the interviews — much more enveloping than one could possibly imagine it could ever be. Indeed, by taking a broad approach over a huge canvas, but keeping the moment-to-moment emotional intensity in check, Lanzmann ends up making the unthinkable into a manageable subject for purposes of his film, and delivers a movie that accomplishes the seemingly impossible. And in the process, gradually, one begins to comprehend the unthinkable in dimensions that those present, victims and participants alike — based on the evidence of the survivors before us — must have accepted at the time, which goes some way to explaining the seemingly unanswerable, of how the catastophic events at the film’s center could have occurred. The sad answer, as one realizes about an eighth of the way through the movie, is that it happened in stages, and little steps taken in isolation, the latter being the key element — most of the participants (though certainly not the planners or the major overseers) never realized precisely the dimensions of the horror in which they were complicit, or to which they were witness. Lanzmann’s movie ends up presenting a revelatory account of the “how” behind the greatest international social horror of the twentieth century — the why is better left to historians, social philosophers, and theologians.

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Shoah – Barnes & Noble

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Shoah | Define Shoah at Dictionary.com

or Shoah

[shoh-uh]

ExamplesWord Origin

From Hebrew

Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018

literally: destruction

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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Shoah | Define Shoah at Dictionary.com

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Shoah – Movie Reviews – Rotten Tomatoes

The Tomatometer rating based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Fresh

The Tomatometer is 60% or higher.

Rotten

The Tomatometer is 59% or lower.

Certified Fresh

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Audience Score

Percentage of users who rate a movie or TV show positively.

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Shoah – Movie Reviews – Rotten Tomatoes

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IFC Center – Shoah

Friday, December 24 – Thursday, January 6, 2011

New 35mm print Special 25th Anniversary presentation

The best documentary of all time. Time Out New York

Lanzmanns monumental examination of the Holocaust grew out of a concern that the genocide perpetrated only 40 years earlier was already retreating into the mists of time, that atrocity was becoming sanitized as History. His massive achievementat once epic and intimate, immediate and definitiveis a triumph of form and content that revealed hidden truths while rewriting the rules of documentary filmmaking. Now a quarter-century old, SHOAH remains nothing less than essential.

I consider SHOAH to be the greatest documentary about contemporary history ever made, bar none, and by far the greatest film Ive ever seen about the Holocaust. Marcel Ophls

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IFC Center – Shoah

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About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

The Visual History Archive is an online portal from USC Shoah Foundation that allows users to search through and view 55,000 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides that have been catalogued and indexed at the Institute. These testimonies were conducted in 64 countries and in 42 languages.

Since April 2013, the Visual History Archive has expanded to include a collection of 86 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Conducted in two countries (U.S.A. and Rwanda), and two languages (English and Kinyarwanda), the initial collection of Rwandan testimonies was accomplished in collaboration with Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial, with additional support provided by IBUKA.

Since February 2014, 30 audiovisual testimonies of survivors of the 1937-38 Nanjing Massacre have been integrated into the VHA. These testimonies are in Mandarin and were conducted in Nanjing, China, through a partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall.

Testimonies from survivors and witnesses to the Armenian Genocide were integrated into the Visual History Archive in April 2015, the centennial of that historic event. For this collection the USC Shoah Foundation partnered with the late Dr. J. Michael Hagopian who filmed all the interviews, his wife Antoinette and the Armenian Film Foundation.

Find out more about the Visual History Archive:

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About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

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Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

“Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah”

Claude Lanzmann, the French journalist and director of the landmark 1985 Holocaust documentary Shoah, died in Paris on Thursday at age 92.

Claude Lanzmann died at his home. He had been very, very weak for several days, a spokeswoman for publishing house Gallimard told AFP.

The Four Sisters, a four-part docu-series about four Jewish Holocaust survivors, was just released in France this week.

Also Read: For 25th Anniversary, IFC to Re-Release ‘Shoah’

The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925 and fought in the resistance as a teenager.

In the 1950s, he plunged into a long career in journalism, mostly with Simone de Beauvoirs journal Les Temps Modernes. He took over as chief editor following her death in 1986.

Lanzmanns move into filmmaking grew out of his journalism, first with 1973s Why Israel? that was based on a series of interviews on French TV.

Also Read: 10 Documentary Shorts Make Oscar Shortlist

But he is best remembered for the nine-and-a-half-hour Shoah, named for the French term for the Holocaust, which gathered extensive interviews with survivors and witnesses of Nazi death camps in Poland, as well as horrifying images of the atrocities.

He began work on Shoah in 1974, and gathered more than 350 hours of footage some of which was later used in subsequent film projects.

Halfway through the year, we’ve already lost a number of stars across Hollywood. Here’s a list of some of the notable celebrities and industry professionals in film, TV, music and sports who have passed away so far in 2018.

Jon Paul Steuer

Steuer, a former child actor who starred in Star Trek: The Next Generation, and most recently under the stage name Jonny Jewels for the rock band P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., died on Jan. 1. He was 33.

Mark Tenser

Tenser, president and CEO of B-Movie studio Crown International Pictures, died on Jan. 1. At his request, his age was not disclosed.

Frank Buxton

Buxton, a writer and director best known for his work on The Odd Couple and Happy Days, died on Jan. 2. He was 87.

Donnelly Rhodes

Canadian actor Donnelly Rhodes, who played chief medical officer Dr. Sherman Cottle on the Battlestar Galactica reboot, died on Jan. 8. He was 80.

John Thompson

Thompson, a major action film producer and head of production at Millennium Films, died on Jan. 9 after a battle with leukemia. He was 71.

“Fast” Eddie Clark

Motrhead guitarist Fast Eddie Clarke died on Jan. 10 at the age of 67 after being admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. He was the last living member of the band’s 1976-1982 lineup.

Dolores O’Riordan

The lead singer of Irish rock group The Cranberries, known for hits like “Linger,” “Dreams” and “Zombie,” died on Jan. 15 at age 46. She died suddenly while recording in London.

Hugh Wilson

Wilson, director of the film comedies Police Academy and The First Wives Club and creator of the hit TV series WKRP In Cincinnati, died on Jan. 16. He was 74.

Simon Shelton

The British actor who portrayed Tinky Winky on “Teletubbies,” Simon Shelton – who also went by the name Simon Barnes – died on January 17. He was 52.

Peter Wyngarde

Wyngarde, the cult British actor who served as Mike Myers inspiration for Austin Powers, died on Jan. 18. He was 90.

Dorothy Malone

Dorothy Malone, a glamour queen of Old Hollywood who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for 1956s Written on the Wind and starred in “Peyton Place” and “Basic Instinct,” died on Jan. 19 of natural causes. She was 92.

Olivia Cole

Cole, the Emmy-winning star of the miniseries “Roots,” died on Jan. 19 at her home inSan Miguel de Allende, Mexico. She was 75.

Fredo Santana

Santana, a Chicago rapper who came up with his cousin Chief Keef, died on Jan. 20. No cause of death was immediately revealed, but Santana was hospitalized in October with kidney and liver failure. He was 27.

Connie Sawyer

Sawyer, a late-blooming actress who starred in “When Harry Met Sally” and “Pineapple Express,” died on Jan. 22. She was 105, and the oldest working member of the Screen Actors Guild.

Lari White

The country singer known for her songs “Now I Know” and “That’s My Baby,” as well as an actress who appeared in “Cast Away” and “No Regrets,” died on Jan. 23 following a battle with cancer. She was 52.

Ursula K. Le Guin

The acclaimed fantasy and science fiction writer, whose works include “Tales From Earthsea” and “Lathe of Heaven,” died in her home in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 23. She was 88.

Joel Taylor

Taylor, a star of the Discovery Channel reality show “Storm Chasers,” died on Jan. 23. He was 38.

Ezra Swerdlow

Swerdlow, a New York-based film producer of “The First Wives Club” and with additional credits on “Spaceballs,” “Alien 3,” “Tootsie” and more, died of complications from pancreatic cancer and ALS in Boston on Jan. 23. He was 64.

Mark E. Smith

The lead singer of the prolific British post-punk band The Fall, died on Jan. 24 in his home. He was 60.

John Morris

Morris, a composer who worked on “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein” and many other Mel Brooks movies, died on Jan. 25. He was 91.

Mark Salling

Actor Mark Salling, known for playing Puck on “Glee,” was found dead on Jan. 30 near a riverbed in Sunland, California.Sallings death came as he awaited sentencing in March after pleading guilty last October to possession of child pornography. The actor was 35.

Louis Zorich

Actor Louis Zorich, star of “Mad About You” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” died on Jan. 30. He had been married to “Moonstruck” star Olympia Dukakis since 1962. He was 93.

Ann Gillis

Actress Ann Gillis, a former child star during the Golden Age of Hollywood and who was featured in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died on Jan. 31. She was 90.

Rasual Butler

Former NBA star Rasual Butler was killed in a car crash on Jan. 31. He was 38.

Dennis Edwards

Edwards, the lead singer of the Motown soul group The Temptations between1968 and 1984, died on Feb. 2 just one day before his 75th birthday.

John Mahoney

Actor John Mahoney, who played Martin Crane on “Frasier” and also starred in “Moonstruck” and “Tin Men,” died on Feb. 4. He was 77.

Mickey Jones

Jones, an actor known for roles in “Total Recall” and “Sling Blade,” died on Feb. 7 following a “long illness.” He was 76.

Jill Messick

Messick, a veteran studio executive, producer and the former manager to actress and activist Rose McGowan, took her own life on Feb. 8. Messick’s family issued a devastating statement blaming, “our new culture of unlimited information sharing and a willingness toaccept statement as fact, specifically citing the fight between Rose McGowan and Harvey Weinstein that also ensnared Messick. She was 50.

Reg E. Cathey

Cathey, the Emmy-winning actor known for his work on “The Wire” and “House of Cards,” died on February 9. He was 59.

John Gavin

Gavin, an actor who starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Spartacus,” died on February 9. He was 86.

Jhann Jhannsson

Jhannsson, an acclaimed, Oscar-nominated and emerging Icelandic film composer known for his work on “Sicario,” “Arrival” and “The Theory of Everything,” died on February 9. He was 48.

Vic Damone

Damone, a singer known for his baritone crooning and for his work on classic films like 1957’s “An Affair to Remember,” died on February 11. He was 89.

Daryle Singletary

The Georgia-born country singer known for his songs “I Let Her Lie” and “Amen Kind of Love” died on February 12. He was 46.

Barbara Alston

Singer Barbara Alston, a member of the ’60s girl group The Crystals who sang on the hit song “Then He Kissed Me,” died on Feb. 16 from complications from the flu. She was 74.

Bruce Margolis

Fox studio executive and TV producer Bruce Margolis, best known for work on “Star” and overseeing “24,” “Prison Break” and “Bones,” died after a battle with cancer on February 16. He was 64.

Billy Graham

The Rev. Billy Graham, a Christian preacher and spiritual adviser to presidents going back to Harry Truman and an icon of American religious life and TV, died on Feb. 21. He was 99.

Emma Chambers

Actress Emma Chambers, who starred in “Notting Hill” and the BBC’s “The Vicar of Dibley,” died on Feb. 21 of natural causes. She was 53.

Bud Luckey

Luckey, an Oscar-nominated animator who designed Woody from Pixar’s Toy Story and voiced Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh, died on Feb. 24. He was 83.

Lewis Gilbert

Gilbert, an Oscar-nominated British director of Alfie and three James Bond movies, died on Feb. 23. He was 97.

Sridevi

Bollywood actress Sridevi Kapoor, also known as just Sridevi, died on Feb. 24. She had appeared in over 150 films in Bollywood. She was 54.

Benjamin Melniker

Melniker, an executive at MGM who had been with the company since 1939, as well as most recently a producer on “Justice League,” died on Feb. 26. He was 104.

Harry J. Ufland

Harry Ufland (right), an agent-turned producer and who was a long-time collaborator with Martin Scorsese on films including “The Last Temptation of Christ,” died in March after suffering from brain cancer. He was 81.

Barry Crimmins

Crimmins, a legendary comedian on the Boston comedy circuit and political advocate for victims of childhood sexual abuse, died on March 1. Weeks before his death Crimmins disclosed a cancer diagnosis. He died beside his wife and filmmaker Bobcat Goldthwaite, who made a documentary on Crimmins titled “Call Me Lucky.” Crimmins was 64.

David Ogden Stiers

The Emmy-nominated actor who playedMajor Charles Emerson Winchester III on “M.A.S.H.” diedof cancer on March 3. He was 75.

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Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

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Shoah DVD: DVDs & Blu-ray Discs | eBay

eBayShop by category Shop by category {“modules”:[“unloadOptimization”,”bandwidthDetection”],”unloadOptimization”:{“browsers”:{“Firefox”:true,”Chrome”:true}},”bandwidthDetection”:{“url”:”https://ir.ebaystatic.com/cr/v/c1/thirtysevens.jpg”,”maxViews”:4,”imgSize”:37,”expiry”:300000,”timeout”:250}} {“delay”:300} SHOAH (1985). Condition: New Sealed DVD. Region: ALL, World Wide, it can be played at any DVD player. Subtitle: English, French, Korean, None (you can choose one or turn off subtitle). Cover has the f… $30.00 Buy It Now or Best Offer All Dvds, cover and case included. Dvds look good with just a few light scratches. Dvds play like new. Dvd cover looks good but has a little sticker residue on the front as shown in the photos All ite… Actor : William Lubtchansky. Director : Claude Lanzmann. Title : Shoah. About Oblivion Enterprises, Inc. DVDs in original pictorial plastic case. still in publisher’s shrinkwrap. never opened. Conditi… $49.99 Buy It Now or Best Offer Free Shipping Actors: None. Studio: Criterion Collection. Playing side of disc is in nice, clean, lightly used but well kept condition. Over all a nice clean viewing copy. If the photo shows the booklet included th…

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Shoah | documentary film by Lanzmann [1985] | Britannica.com

documentary film by Lanzmann [1985] THIS IS A DIRECTORY PAGE. Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic. film was the stepping-stone to Shoah, his most-acclaimed work. After Israel, Why was released, the Foreign Ministry in Israel asked him to create a film on the Holocaust. The film consumed the next 11 years of his life. Perhaps the most-notable aspect of Shoah is that, in nine-and-a-half hours, there Claude Lanzmanns Shoah (1985), for example, a nine-and-a-half-hour examination of the Nazi concentration camps, received limited theatrical distribution in many areas because of its length but still managed to reach wide audiences through the distribution markets provided by the growing cable television and videocassette industries. Ken Burnss

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The European Holocaust | USC Shoah Foundation

USC Shoah Foundations collection of nearly 55,000 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors and witnesses amounts to the largest archive of its kind in the world, and it continues to grow. Covering a wide-array of experiences and topics, the collection includes interviews with Jewish survivors, homosexual survivors, Jehovahs Witness survivors, liberators and liberation witnesses, political prisoners, rescuers and aid providers, Roma and Sinti (Gypsy) survivors, survivors of Eugenics policies, and war crimes trials participants. The Institute recorded the vast majority of the Holocaust testimonies in the Visual History Archive during its formative years. Between 1994 and 1999, the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation now USC Shoah Foundation exceeded the goal of founder Steven Spielberg to collect 50,000 Holocaust interviews. The Institute is now committed to expanding its Visual History Archive and becoming a digital repository for other audiovisual Holocaust survivor and witness testimonies. Through a program called Preserving the Legacy, USC Shoah Foundation digitizes, indexes, and integrates into the Visual History Archive Holocaust testimony taken and owned by other museums and institutions to make them more accessible to scholars, students, educators, and the general public. Efforts are underway to collect as many as 3,000 new life stories in this fashion. The Institute is also in the midst of a campaign to record at least 50 testimonies from the North Africa and Middle East region, where the Nazi regime had gained a foothold during World War II. USC Shoah Foundation has also partnered with USC Institute for Creative Technologies and Conscience Display to conceive and design a cutting-edge technology called New Dimensions in Testimony, which enables people to interact with a projected image of a real Holocaust survivor, who responds to questions asked in real time. With this endeavor, a handful of Holocaust survivors who have already sat before a camera for USC Shoah Foundations Visual History Archive are giving testimony again. This time, however, they sit before 50 cameras arranged in a rig to capture a three-dimensional recording of them telling their stories in a new way, by answering questions that people are most likely to ask. Funding for New Dimensions in Testimony was provided in part by Pears Foundation and Louis. F. Smith. To support any of these ongoing projects, please contact Dornsife Advancement at (213) 740-4990 or advancement@dornsife.usc.edu.

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Shoah – Barnes & Noble

Shoah Shoah is an astonishing film on a number of levels, starting with its own existence — a documentary on a subject so horrendous, and horrific, that few potential filmgoers really want to think much about it, or the events related within. But Jewish-French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann took the plunge, head-first into his subject, in the hope that the audience would follow for 570 minutes. And as it turned out, Lanzmann’s extreme approach to filmmaking was precisely the correct one to take in dealing with his subject, the Nazi extermination of Europe’s Jews from 1938 through 1945. At first, in its opening minutes, the documentary seems to be shaping up as a relentless parade of interviews, all done in the subjects’ original languages and translated as audio live in front of the camera, as well as on-screen. But Shoah is a lot more than a succession of talk in multiple languages. Rather, Lanzmann did what one only wishes the Stuart Schulberg documentary Nuremberg (1947) could have done — he brings us and many of his subjects (including some low-level perpetrators) to the sites of the crimes in question, so that we perceive the dimensions and settings when they tell of the vile acts of murder and desecration they were obliged to commit, or which were committed upon them or those around them (including family members — in a quietly horrific moment, one survivor, recalls being forced to carry out the orders to hide a graveyard, and tells of finding the bodies of his own family in one layer of corpses). What’s more, the calm of the talk, and the detachment brought about by the need for translation, has the eerie effect of making the nature of the film — which is definitely not short of striking visuals in support of the interviews — much more enveloping than one could possibly imagine it could ever be. Indeed, by taking a broad approach over a huge canvas, but keeping the moment-to-moment emotional intensity in check, Lanzmann ends up making the unthinkable into a manageable subject for purposes of his film, and delivers a movie that accomplishes the seemingly impossible. And in the process, gradually, one begins to comprehend the unthinkable in dimensions that those present, victims and participants alike — based on the evidence of the survivors before us — must have accepted at the time, which goes some way to explaining the seemingly unanswerable, of how the catastophic events at the film’s center could have occurred. The sad answer, as one realizes about an eighth of the way through the movie, is that it happened in stages, and little steps taken in isolation, the latter being the key element — most of the participants (though certainly not the planners or the major overseers) never realized precisely the dimensions of the horror in which they were complicit, or to which they were witness. Lanzmann’s movie ends up presenting a revelatory account of the “how” behind the greatest international social horror of the twentieth century — the why is better left to historians, social philosophers, and theologians.

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Shoah | Define Shoah at Dictionary.com

or Shoah [shoh-uh] ExamplesWord Origin From Hebrew Dictionary.com UnabridgedBased on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. 2018 literally: destruction Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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Shoah – Movie Reviews – Rotten Tomatoes

The Tomatometer rating based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show. Fresh The Tomatometer is 60% or higher. Rotten The Tomatometer is 59% or lower. Certified Fresh Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics. Audience Score Percentage of users who rate a movie or TV show positively.

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IFC Center – Shoah

Friday, December 24 – Thursday, January 6, 2011 New 35mm print Special 25th Anniversary presentation The best documentary of all time. Time Out New York Lanzmanns monumental examination of the Holocaust grew out of a concern that the genocide perpetrated only 40 years earlier was already retreating into the mists of time, that atrocity was becoming sanitized as History. His massive achievementat once epic and intimate, immediate and definitiveis a triumph of form and content that revealed hidden truths while rewriting the rules of documentary filmmaking. Now a quarter-century old, SHOAH remains nothing less than essential. I consider SHOAH to be the greatest documentary about contemporary history ever made, bar none, and by far the greatest film Ive ever seen about the Holocaust. Marcel Ophls

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August 2, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

About the Visual History Archive | USC Shoah Foundation

The Visual History Archive is an online portal from USC Shoah Foundation that allows users to search through and view 55,000 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides that have been catalogued and indexed at the Institute. These testimonies were conducted in 64 countries and in 42 languages. Since April 2013, the Visual History Archive has expanded to include a collection of 86 audiovisual testimonies of survivors and witnesses of the 1994 Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Conducted in two countries (U.S.A. and Rwanda), and two languages (English and Kinyarwanda), the initial collection of Rwandan testimonies was accomplished in collaboration with Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial, with additional support provided by IBUKA. Since February 2014, 30 audiovisual testimonies of survivors of the 1937-38 Nanjing Massacre have been integrated into the VHA. These testimonies are in Mandarin and were conducted in Nanjing, China, through a partnership with the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall. Testimonies from survivors and witnesses to the Armenian Genocide were integrated into the Visual History Archive in April 2015, the centennial of that historic event. For this collection the USC Shoah Foundation partnered with the late Dr. J. Michael Hagopian who filmed all the interviews, his wife Antoinette and the Armenian Film Foundation. Find out more about the Visual History Archive:

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July 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed

Claude Lanzmann, Director of Holocaust Doc ‘Shoah,’ Dies at 92

“Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah” Claude Lanzmann, the French journalist and director of the landmark 1985 Holocaust documentary Shoah, died in Paris on Thursday at age 92. Claude Lanzmann died at his home. He had been very, very weak for several days, a spokeswoman for publishing house Gallimard told AFP. The Four Sisters, a four-part docu-series about four Jewish Holocaust survivors, was just released in France this week. Also Read: For 25th Anniversary, IFC to Re-Release ‘Shoah’ The son of Russian Jewish immigrants to France, Lanzmann was born in Paris in 1925 and fought in the resistance as a teenager. In the 1950s, he plunged into a long career in journalism, mostly with Simone de Beauvoirs journal Les Temps Modernes. He took over as chief editor following her death in 1986. Lanzmanns move into filmmaking grew out of his journalism, first with 1973s Why Israel? that was based on a series of interviews on French TV. Also Read: 10 Documentary Shorts Make Oscar Shortlist But he is best remembered for the nine-and-a-half-hour Shoah, named for the French term for the Holocaust, which gathered extensive interviews with survivors and witnesses of Nazi death camps in Poland, as well as horrifying images of the atrocities. He began work on Shoah in 1974, and gathered more than 350 hours of footage some of which was later used in subsequent film projects. Halfway through the year, we’ve already lost a number of stars across Hollywood. Here’s a list of some of the notable celebrities and industry professionals in film, TV, music and sports who have passed away so far in 2018. Jon Paul Steuer Steuer, a former child actor who starred in Star Trek: The Next Generation, and most recently under the stage name Jonny Jewels for the rock band P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., died on Jan. 1. He was 33. Mark Tenser Tenser, president and CEO of B-Movie studio Crown International Pictures, died on Jan. 1. At his request, his age was not disclosed. Frank Buxton Buxton, a writer and director best known for his work on The Odd Couple and Happy Days, died on Jan. 2. He was 87. Donnelly Rhodes Canadian actor Donnelly Rhodes, who played chief medical officer Dr. Sherman Cottle on the Battlestar Galactica reboot, died on Jan. 8. He was 80. John Thompson Thompson, a major action film producer and head of production at Millennium Films, died on Jan. 9 after a battle with leukemia. He was 71. “Fast” Eddie Clark Motrhead guitarist Fast Eddie Clarke died on Jan. 10 at the age of 67 after being admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. He was the last living member of the band’s 1976-1982 lineup. Dolores O’Riordan The lead singer of Irish rock group The Cranberries, known for hits like “Linger,” “Dreams” and “Zombie,” died on Jan. 15 at age 46. She died suddenly while recording in London. Hugh Wilson Wilson, director of the film comedies Police Academy and The First Wives Club and creator of the hit TV series WKRP In Cincinnati, died on Jan. 16. He was 74. Simon Shelton The British actor who portrayed Tinky Winky on “Teletubbies,” Simon Shelton – who also went by the name Simon Barnes – died on January 17. He was 52. Peter Wyngarde Wyngarde, the cult British actor who served as Mike Myers inspiration for Austin Powers, died on Jan. 18. He was 90. Dorothy Malone Dorothy Malone, a glamour queen of Old Hollywood who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for 1956s Written on the Wind and starred in “Peyton Place” and “Basic Instinct,” died on Jan. 19 of natural causes. She was 92. Olivia Cole Cole, the Emmy-winning star of the miniseries “Roots,” died on Jan. 19 at her home inSan Miguel de Allende, Mexico. She was 75. Fredo Santana Santana, a Chicago rapper who came up with his cousin Chief Keef, died on Jan. 20. No cause of death was immediately revealed, but Santana was hospitalized in October with kidney and liver failure. He was 27. Connie Sawyer Sawyer, a late-blooming actress who starred in “When Harry Met Sally” and “Pineapple Express,” died on Jan. 22. She was 105, and the oldest working member of the Screen Actors Guild. Lari White The country singer known for her songs “Now I Know” and “That’s My Baby,” as well as an actress who appeared in “Cast Away” and “No Regrets,” died on Jan. 23 following a battle with cancer. She was 52. Ursula K. Le Guin The acclaimed fantasy and science fiction writer, whose works include “Tales From Earthsea” and “Lathe of Heaven,” died in her home in Portland, Oregon on Jan. 23. She was 88. Joel Taylor Taylor, a star of the Discovery Channel reality show “Storm Chasers,” died on Jan. 23. He was 38. Ezra Swerdlow Swerdlow, a New York-based film producer of “The First Wives Club” and with additional credits on “Spaceballs,” “Alien 3,” “Tootsie” and more, died of complications from pancreatic cancer and ALS in Boston on Jan. 23. He was 64. Mark E. Smith The lead singer of the prolific British post-punk band The Fall, died on Jan. 24 in his home. He was 60. John Morris Morris, a composer who worked on “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein” and many other Mel Brooks movies, died on Jan. 25. He was 91. Mark Salling Actor Mark Salling, known for playing Puck on “Glee,” was found dead on Jan. 30 near a riverbed in Sunland, California.Sallings death came as he awaited sentencing in March after pleading guilty last October to possession of child pornography. The actor was 35. Louis Zorich Actor Louis Zorich, star of “Mad About You” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” died on Jan. 30. He had been married to “Moonstruck” star Olympia Dukakis since 1962. He was 93. Ann Gillis Actress Ann Gillis, a former child star during the Golden Age of Hollywood and who was featured in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died on Jan. 31. She was 90. Rasual Butler Former NBA star Rasual Butler was killed in a car crash on Jan. 31. He was 38. Dennis Edwards Edwards, the lead singer of the Motown soul group The Temptations between1968 and 1984, died on Feb. 2 just one day before his 75th birthday. John Mahoney Actor John Mahoney, who played Martin Crane on “Frasier” and also starred in “Moonstruck” and “Tin Men,” died on Feb. 4. He was 77. Mickey Jones Jones, an actor known for roles in “Total Recall” and “Sling Blade,” died on Feb. 7 following a “long illness.” He was 76. Jill Messick Messick, a veteran studio executive, producer and the former manager to actress and activist Rose McGowan, took her own life on Feb. 8. Messick’s family issued a devastating statement blaming, “our new culture of unlimited information sharing and a willingness toaccept statement as fact, specifically citing the fight between Rose McGowan and Harvey Weinstein that also ensnared Messick. She was 50. Reg E. Cathey Cathey, the Emmy-winning actor known for his work on “The Wire” and “House of Cards,” died on February 9. He was 59. John Gavin Gavin, an actor who starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Spartacus,” died on February 9. He was 86. Jhann Jhannsson Jhannsson, an acclaimed, Oscar-nominated and emerging Icelandic film composer known for his work on “Sicario,” “Arrival” and “The Theory of Everything,” died on February 9. He was 48. Vic Damone Damone, a singer known for his baritone crooning and for his work on classic films like 1957’s “An Affair to Remember,” died on February 11. He was 89. Daryle Singletary The Georgia-born country singer known for his songs “I Let Her Lie” and “Amen Kind of Love” died on February 12. He was 46. Barbara Alston Singer Barbara Alston, a member of the ’60s girl group The Crystals who sang on the hit song “Then He Kissed Me,” died on Feb. 16 from complications from the flu. She was 74. Bruce Margolis Fox studio executive and TV producer Bruce Margolis, best known for work on “Star” and overseeing “24,” “Prison Break” and “Bones,” died after a battle with cancer on February 16. He was 64. Billy Graham The Rev. Billy Graham, a Christian preacher and spiritual adviser to presidents going back to Harry Truman and an icon of American religious life and TV, died on Feb. 21. He was 99. Emma Chambers Actress Emma Chambers, who starred in “Notting Hill” and the BBC’s “The Vicar of Dibley,” died on Feb. 21 of natural causes. She was 53. Bud Luckey Luckey, an Oscar-nominated animator who designed Woody from Pixar’s Toy Story and voiced Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh, died on Feb. 24. He was 83. Lewis Gilbert Gilbert, an Oscar-nominated British director of Alfie and three James Bond movies, died on Feb. 23. He was 97. Sridevi Bollywood actress Sridevi Kapoor, also known as just Sridevi, died on Feb. 24. She had appeared in over 150 films in Bollywood. She was 54. Benjamin Melniker Melniker, an executive at MGM who had been with the company since 1939, as well as most recently a producer on “Justice League,” died on Feb. 26. He was 104. Harry J. Ufland Harry Ufland (right), an agent-turned producer and who was a long-time collaborator with Martin Scorsese on films including “The Last Temptation of Christ,” died in March after suffering from brain cancer. He was 81. Barry Crimmins Crimmins, a legendary comedian on the Boston comedy circuit and political advocate for victims of childhood sexual abuse, died on March 1. Weeks before his death Crimmins disclosed a cancer diagnosis. He died beside his wife and filmmaker Bobcat Goldthwaite, who made a documentary on Crimmins titled “Call Me Lucky.” Crimmins was 64. David Ogden Stiers The Emmy-nominated actor who playedMajor Charles Emerson Winchester III on “M.A.S.H.” diedof cancer on March 3. He was 75.

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July 8, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Shoah  Comments Closed


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