Archive for the ‘Tel Aviv’ Category

Tel Aviv | Twitter

You’ve waited for so long- So let us show you #TelAviv! Are you ready for the biggest #party on earth? #Eurovision2019Credits: #Music by Offer Nissim ft Ilan Peled#Israel Calling footage courtesy of Tali Eshkoli#Drone- Shahar Siri, Barak Brinker pic.twitter.com/K1WPv6SdKt

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Sheraton Tel Aviv Hotel – Tel Aviv | SPG – marriott.com

Come and discover our unique position between sea and city. Our luxurious light-filled d cor is a dynamic reflection of Israel’s upbeat and active spirit. Be sure to visit the artist’s quarter and small port in nearby, picturesque Jaffa. We are surrounded by many great restaurants, like: Onza, Salva Vida, OCD Restaurant and Bar Ochel. Stay fit at near by fitness centers, relax at a spa or enjoy a game of golf! We, at the Sheraton Tel Aviv Hotel, are looking forward to your stay with us.

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September 21, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv | Fallout Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Mentioned-only settlement

Tel Aviv (Hebrew: ) is a large city in Israel.

In December 2053, the city was destroyed by a terrorist nuclear weapon, irradiating the surrounding area, and possibly even the entire country.[1]

The manual for Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel states the bombing of Tel Aviv happened in 2035.[2]

The attacks on the city may be a reference to Nevil Shute’s 1957 post-apocalyptic novel On the Beach, in which Tel Aviv is bombed by unknown forces and becomes the second city to be destroyed during the nuclear war.

Tel Aviv is mentioned only in the Fallout Bible and Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel Manual.

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July 26, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv

From the science lab to the beach, biology students share their perspective on life at NYU Tel Aviv.

At NYU Tel Aviv, students experience life in one of the world’s most intriguing and multidimensional cities. A vibrant coastal metropolis on the Mediterranean, Tel Aviv is the cultural, financial, and technological center of Israel. Students explore this truly global city and acquire a sophisticated understanding of Israel, the Middle East and the interrelationships between cultures, political movements, and religious traditions. Students benefit from high caliber local professors who teach students in areas such as journalism, politics, Hebrew and Arabic. Students connect with local culture through experiential learning/internships, partnerships with a local university and excursions to surrounding areas in Israel.

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July 25, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv Pride – Wikipedia

Tel Aviv Pride (Hebrew: , Arabic: ) is an annual, week-long series of events in Tel Aviv that celebrate Israel’s LGBT community life, scheduled during the second week of June, as part of the international observance of Gay Pride Month. The most-attended event is Pride Parade.[citation needed]

The first event that many consider to be the first ‘Pride’ event to take place in Israel was a protest in 1979 at Rabin Square. The event more closely associated with Tel Aviv Pride as it is known today was the Tel Aviv Love Parade in 1997.

The parade assembles and begins at Meir Park, then travels along Bugrashov Street, Ben Yehuda Street and Ben Gurion Boulevard, and culminates in a party in Charles Clore Park on the seafront. There were 200,000 participants reported in 2016, making it one of the largest in the world.[2] The parade is the biggest pride celebration in continental Asia, drawing more than 200,000 people in 2017, approximately 30,000 of them tourists.[3] Tel Aviv was the first location in Israel where “gay” events were organised and also the first city in Israel to host a gay pride parade.

In the early years of the Pride Parade, the majority of participants were politically motivated. Later on, as the Parade grew, people who took part came with the notion that the Parade should focus on LGBT rights, equality and equal representation, and should not be used as a stage for radical politics, which are not accepted by most of the Parade’s participants. Gradually, the Parade came to be less political due to the scale and diversity of participation. In recent years, the Parade’s reputation for inclusiveness, along with Tel Aviv’s world-class status as a gay-friendly destination and a top party city,[4] has attracted more than 100,000 participants, many of them from around the world.

By 2000, the Parade had evolved from being a political demonstration and became more of a social-entertainment event and street celebration.

The eleventh Tel Aviv Pride Parade, which took place in 2008, was accompanied by the opening of the LGBT Centre in Tel Aviv. This is the first municipal gay centre in Israel, whose purpose is to provide services specifically for members of the city’s LGBT community – such as health care, cultural events, meetings of different LGBT groups, a coffee shop, and many others.

During the 2009 Pride Parade, which coincided with the centennial celebration of Tel Aviv’s historic establishment as a city, five same-sex couples got married in what was called “the wedding of the century” by the Israeli celebrity Gal Uchovsky.

The parade on 10 June 2011 grew to an estimated 100,000 participants and included official representatives of LGBT groups from global companies such as Google and Microsoft. (Tel Aviv boasts one of the largest concentrations of hi-tech companies of any city in the world.)[5]

In 2012, the parade attracted crowds exceeding 100,000, making it again the largest gay pride event in the Middle East and Asia. The event is advertised all around the world by the Israeli Tourism Ministry, marking the city of Tel Aviv as “the” premiere LGBT tourism destination.[6]

For 2014, with an anticipated parade attendance of 150,000, a decision was made to move the after-parade beach party to Charles Clore Park (from Gordon Beach) for its much-larger space (the previous location could no longer accommodate the increasingly overwhelming crowds). The event was hosted by Israeli actress/supermodel Moran Attias, with performances by Israel’s transgender superstar Dana International, the Israeli representative for 2014’s Eurovision Song Contest Mei Feingold, and the Israeli actress/pop-rock star Ninet.

In 2017, parade route was briefly blocked by protesters against Israeli occupation of Palestinian Territories. They built a mock separation wall with inscription – Theres no pride in occupation” and did not allow the parade from proceeding for several minutes. They were immediately dispersed by police who were present.[7]

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TEL AVIV | ISRAEL – A TRAVEL TOUR – HD 1080P – YouTube

A walking tour around the city of Tel Aviv, Israel.

Official website and blog: http://globetrotteralpha.com/

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The film chronologically progresses from morning to the small hours of the night, showcasing daily life around Tel Aviv.

For those planning on visiting, those whod like to visit but cannot or those who might be nostalgic and want to re-live their past visits / life there, hopefully this film shall satisfy, time and time again.

Filmed in December 2010.

For more information on Tel Aviv:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Aviv

Google Maps:https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tel…

Filming Equipment:

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– Sony HDR AX2000 – Sony Nex VG10

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– Glidecam HD-2000 hand-held camera stabilization- Glidecam HD-4000 hand-held camera stabilization – Glidecam ‘Smooth Shooter’ body mounted camera stabilization system.- Sennheiser K6 module + ME66 shotgun microphone capsule.

Editing Software:Sony Vegas Pro

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January 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Cheap Flights to Tel Aviv from USA and Canada | WOW air

Tel Aviv is an icon of liberal, progressive Israel, where the LGBT community is welcomed and celebrated. The city also boasts 300 days of sunshine a year, great bars, exciting nightclubs, world-class restaurants and lively flea markets.

Walking and biking is the preferred method of transportation in Tel Aviv, and with a three-mile-long beachside boardwalk, where you can cruise to your hearts desire, there is plenty of opportunities to enjoy the view. We recommend exploring the Neve Tzedek area or taking a stroll down Rothschild Boulevard, Tel Avivs main street. Both offer fascinating architecture, great restaurants, and a vibrant nightlife. Furthermore, a visit to the Sarona market is not to be missed.

The once busy Old Tel Aviv Port has gone through major revitalization since being closed in the 1960s and has turned into one of the most popular entertainment districts of the city. Cozy cafs, trendy boutiques, delectable restaurants and seaside bars now rest on the wooden docks. This is the perfect place to spend a fun and relaxed evening.

For sunbathers, the Gordon-Frishman Beach comes highly recommended. Located besideTel Avivs most popular hotel areas the beach has powdery sands and great views of the Mediterranean.

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Cheap Flights to Tel Aviv from USA and Canada | WOW air

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January 17, 2018   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv & Jaffa – Jewish Virtual Library

Put simply, Tel Aviv is where the action is in Israel.

The beaches are clean and fulll of white sand, the sea enticing, the nightclubs hopping, the shopping plentiful and the restaurants appetizing. During the day, stroll down the boardwalk-style promenade or on the beach itself. At dusk, catch the nightlife scene along Dizengoff Street. Meet up at the sculpture fountain created by the acclaimed Israeli artist Yaacov Agam and go to a club, or just hang out and people-watch from an outdoor cafe. Tel Aviv is also a good base for exploring the northern and southern Mediterranean coasts.

Tel Aviv is the first all-Jewish city in modern times. Originally named Ahuzat Bayit, it was founded by 60 families in 1909 as a Jewish neighborhood near Jaffa. In 1910, the name was changed to Tel Aviv, meaning “hill of spring.” The name was taken from Ezekiel 3:15, “…and I came to the exiles at Tel Aviv,” and from a reference in Herzl’s novel Altneuland, in which he foresaw the future Jewish state as a socialist utopia.

Most Jews were expelled from Jaffa and Tel Aviv by the Turks during World War I, but returned after the war when Britain received the mandate for Palestine.

The population of Tel Aviv gradually swelled, particularly as Jews were stimulated to leave predominantly Arab Jaffa by unrest in the 1920s. Arab forces in Jaffa shelled Tel Aviv in 1948 prior to the beginning of the actual war. Jewish forces responded by capturing the city two days before declaring independence. The declaration was made in the home of the city’s mayor Meir Dizengoff.

Because Jerusalem was occupied by Jordan after Israel became an independent state in 1948, the temporary capital and home of the government offices was in Tel Aviv. Several government offices remain there and Tel Aviv is still home to foreign diplomats from countries (including the U.S.) that don’t recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Today, Tel Aviv is Israel’s second largest city (after Jerusalem), with a population of 380,000, and among the big city problems it shares is traffic congestion. Things are more spread out in Tel Aviv than the smaller cities, but it’s still often easier — and faster — to travel by foot. Walk along the Orange Routes, for example, to get acquainted with the city. Though much of the city is a drab gray, many buildings, especially along Rothschild Boulevard, actually have an interesting architectural pedigree that can be traced to the Bauhaus architecture of pre-Nazi Germany. There are more than 5,000 Bauhaus buildings, the largest number in any one city in the world. In fact, the city’s outstanding universal value led UNESCO to recognize it as a World Heritage Site.” Tel Aviv is also known as, “The white city”, named so in account of the the bright colors of the building style: white, off-white, light yellow. There are over 1,500 buildings marked for historic conservation in Tel Aviv.

Israel Fact

Fifty percent of the polished diamonds in the world come from Israel.

Tel Aviv is the country’s business and cultural center. The Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, founded in 1953, and the Diamond Exchange, are two of major economic institutions in the city. For the arts, the Habima National Theater is excellent and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra is world-class. The city also boasts several impressive museums and a top-flight university.

Though no Sears Tower or Empire State Building, the Azrieli Tower is the citys tallest building, at 614 feet (the tallest in the country is Migdal Shaar Ayir in nearby Ramat Gan at 801 feet). Before the Observation Floor was opened to the public, Israels highest observation deck was the 433-foot-high rooftop of the Shalom Meir Tower, which had been Israels tallest building for 34 years. Due to terrorism threats, the Azrieli Towers mall, one of the busiest in Israel, is probably the worlds most secure shopping center.

In addition to Dizengoff, other streets filled with shops, galleries and restaurants worth strolling are Allenby and Ben Yehuda streets. Off Rehov HaCarmel, for example, you’ll find an open-air market. If you walk north from Jaffa down the seashore for about an hour, you’ll reach the Tel Aviv port (Namal), a hip area of restaurants and clubs around the intersection of Dizengoff and Yirmiyahu streets.

The Tel Aviv Museum on Sderot Shaul Hamelekh is home to magnificent works of art, particularly sculpture and paintings by local artists. Another popular museum is the home of Israel’s national poet Hayyim Nahman Bialik. A small, less visited museum is devoted to Nahum Gutman, one of Israel’s most well-known artists.

David Ben-Gurion’s home in the center of Tel Aviv has also been turned into a museum. The modest digs are impressive because they show the simple way the country’s most powerful politician lived. Besides a collection of awards and gifts assembled in the house, his awesome library of 20,000 volumes remains intact, filling much of the upper floor of the house and testifying to the man’s thirst for knowledge.

A less well known museum is the Haganah Museum on Sderot Rothschild. It was set up in the apartment of the founder of the Haganah, Eliyahu Golomb. Despite being one of the most wanted men in Palestine, the British never found Golomb’s home. Additions to the building now house collections of weapons and exhibits on the struggle for independence.

One can’t miss attraction is Beth Hatefutsoth, the Museum of the Diaspora, on the campus of Tel Aviv University. It contains exhibits on the history of the Jewish people covering more than 2,500 years. The University itself is also a nice place to visit and a popular destination for foreign students spending time studying in Israel.

Tel Aviv University is in the suburb of Ramat Aviv. Another academic institution, Bar Ilan University is in the suburb of Ramat Gan. Some of the other well-known neighborhoods in Tel Aviv include the Orthodox enclave of B’nei Brak, the “Beverly Hills” of Israel, Savyon, and one Israel’s earliest modern settlements, Petah Tikvah, which was founded in 1878.

Another can’t miss museum, perhaps the most moving in Israel, is the Palmach Museum. You need a reservation, but it’s well worth it. Instead of walking through halls of exhibits, you follow a group of Palmachniks as they tell the story of their experiences during the fight for independence.

The beautiful area of Neve tzedek (Oasis of Justice) was actually the first neighborhood of Tel Aviv. It was established in 1887 on land that belonged to a political activist named Aaron Shlush. You can still see his house as well as other old buildings representative of the architecture of the early days of settlement in Israel. Don’t miss the Suzanne Dellal Center for dance and theater, the home of the world famous BatSheva Dance Company. Neve Tzedek is the home of many artists whose works are displayed throughout the area. Pull up a chair at a sidewalk cafe and relax before continuing your tour.

A few minutes walk from Neve Tzeded is the IDF museum. This is a collection of building that have exhibits on various IDF units, commanders and weapons. If you’re interested in firearms, this is the place for you. Next door is The Station, another place to shop and eat built the site of the first train station ever built in the Middle East in 1892. Replacing camels, the train took people and freight on the 35 mile journey from Jaffa to Jerusalem in just six hours. The station was no used after 1948 and was left in disrepair until opening as a museum and entertainment complex in 2010.

Jaffa has been a fortified port city overlooking the Mediterranean Sea for more than 4,000 years. It is one of the world’s most ancient towns. It has been the target of conquerors throughout the ages because of its strategic locations between Asia, Africa and Europe.

Israel Fact

According to the Bible, Jonah left from Jaffa on his fateful voyage before encountering the whale. Christians learn hat St. Peter miraculously restored life to Tabitha in Jaffa.

Up until the early 20th century, when visitors came to Palestine, they usually arrived in Jaffa. The coast there is too rocky for ships to land, so they usually had to anchor offshore and send their passengers to the port in longboats and dinghies.

Today, Jaffa is a popular tourist destination because of its beautifully restored old quarter filled with galleries, shops and restaurants. One of the few religious sites is the house of Simon the Tanner, where, according to the New Testament, Peter first realized the gospel message had to be extended beyond the confines of Judaism.

You can walk from Tel Aviv, but it’s a good 40 minutes, and once you get past the strip of hotels not as well-trafficked, especially at night. The easiest spot to locate is Hagana Square where the clock tower stands. It was built in 1906 by the Turkish Sultan, Abdul Hamid II, to commemorate his 30th anniversary as ruler.

If you head toward the minaret towering over the Mahmoudiya Mosque, you’ll find yourself in a Middle Eastern buffet, with cafes and kiosks selling all of the region’s delicacies.

The Visitors’ Center in Kedumim Square has exhibits of archaeological remains and the history of Jaffa. The square is a good place to sit and have a picnic and people watch. At night, bands often play here. The streets off the square are lined with shops, nightclubs and cafes.

The ancient port is now a modern sailing facility and a tourist attraction with restaurants and entertainment.

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Tel Aviv & Jaffa – Jewish Virtual Library

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January 15, 2018   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Lorde Cancels Tel Aviv Concert, Caves to Critics of Israel

Grammy winner Lorde has formally canceled her upcoming concert scheduled for Tel Aviv on June 5 after caving to anti-Israel activists and fans.

We regret to announce the cancelation of the Lorde concert in Israel planned for June, the shows organizers told Israeli media outlet YNET (viaNew Zealand Media and Entertainment). The tickets already bought will be reimbursed within 14 business days. As to the circumstances that led to the cancellation of the show, Lorde is expected to publish a statement via Twitter soon.

The singer released the following statement:

hey guys, so about this israel show ive received an overwhelming number of messages & letters and have had a lot of discussions with people holding many views, and i think the right decision at this time is to cancel the show. i pride myself on being an informed young citizen, and i had done a lot of reading and sought a lot of opinions before deciding to book a show in tel aviv, but Im not too proud to admit i didnt make the right call on this one. tel aviv, its been a dream of mine to visit this beautiful part of the world for many years, and im truly sorry to reverse my commitment to come play for you. i hope one day we can all dance. L x

Also Read: Lorde Predicted Fall of Powerful Men in Hollywood Almost a Year Ago: ‘This Came True I Guess’

IsraeliCulture Minister Miri Regev hoped Lorde would reverse her decision. Lorde, Im hoping you can be a pure heroine, like the title of your first album, be a heroine of pure culture, free from any foreign and ridiculous political considerations, she said.

Lordeannounced her 2018 Melodrama world tourback in June. A performance was scheduled for the Tel Aviv Convention Centre on June 5, 2018 at 7 p.m. ActivistsNadia Abu-Shanab (Palestinian) and Justine Sachs (Jewish)wrote a joint letter to Lordethat called for her to cancel her Israel concert stop in protest of the countrys treatment of Palestinians.

The 60th Grammy Awards nominations were a triumph for hip-hop — but beyond that, they embraced a few dark horses and ignored several favorites. Here’s the scorecard.

SURPRISE: Jay-Z, the guy with the most nominations this year, eight, was recognized in major categories (Album of the Year, Song of the Year, Record of the Year) where he was not expected to be a big contender.

SNUB: For the first time in three years, country music was shut out in the top categories, leaving the likes of Miranda Lambert and her The Weight of These Wings album out in the cold.

SURPRISE: Julia Michaels, the only white artist in the Best New Artist category also made a surprise appearance in the Song of the Year category with Issues.

SNUB: The pioneering rockers Metallica were thought to have a chance to crash the Album of the Year category with Hardwired To Self Destruct, but they ended up with a single nod in the Best Rock Song category.

SNUB: James Arthur, Logic and Cardi B. were considered likelier Best New Artist nominees, but rapper Lil Uzi Vert grabbed the final slot.

SNUB: Everybody thought Ed Sheerand be a lock for the top categories, but everybody was wrong — his album and song Shape of You shockingly landed a paltry two nominations in the pop categories.

SURPRISE: Its not a surprise that the deep-voiced bard was nominated for his final album, but its delicious to find Leonard Cohen competing against Chris Cornell and Foo Fighters in the Best Rock Performance category, and against Alabama Shakes and Blind Boys of Alabama for Best American Roots Performance.

SNUB: Lady Gaga was thought to be a Song of the Year contender for Million Reasons and an Album of the Year contender for Joanne, but couldnt get noms outside the pop categories.

SURPRISE: Senator Bernie Sanders lost in the primaries but is now nominated for Best Spoken Word Album for Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In. This time, hes competing against Bruce Springsteen and Carrie Fisher.

SNUB: Kesha did get two pop nominations for her album Rainbow and song Praying, but she had Song of the Year and Record of the Year aspirations.

SURPRISE: Childish Gambino, the name used by actor Donald Glover in his musical career, wasnt expected to contend in the Album of the Year and Record of the Year categories, but his album Awaken My Love and song Redbone were both nominees.

SNUB: We wont really know if Grammy voters have cooled on Taylor Swift until next year, when her album Reputation is eligible. But the singles Look What You Made Me Do was eligible, and it was shut out.

Voters loved Julia Michaels, Childish Gambino and Bernie Sanders (!), but didnt embrace Tayor Swift, Lady Gaga or country music

The 60th Grammy Awards nominations were a triumph for hip-hop — but beyond that, they embraced a few dark horses and ignored several favorites. Here’s the scorecard.

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Lorde Cancels Tel Aviv Concert, Caves to Critics of Israel

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December 23, 2017   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv | Twitter

You’ve waited for so long- So let us show you #TelAviv! Are you ready for the biggest #party on earth? #Eurovision2019Credits: #Music by Offer Nissim ft Ilan Peled#Israel Calling footage courtesy of Tali Eshkoli#Drone- Shahar Siri, Barak Brinker pic.twitter.com/K1WPv6SdKt

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October 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Sheraton Tel Aviv Hotel – Tel Aviv | SPG – marriott.com

Come and discover our unique position between sea and city. Our luxurious light-filled d cor is a dynamic reflection of Israel’s upbeat and active spirit. Be sure to visit the artist’s quarter and small port in nearby, picturesque Jaffa. We are surrounded by many great restaurants, like: Onza, Salva Vida, OCD Restaurant and Bar Ochel. Stay fit at near by fitness centers, relax at a spa or enjoy a game of golf! We, at the Sheraton Tel Aviv Hotel, are looking forward to your stay with us.

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September 21, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv | Fallout Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Mentioned-only settlement Tel Aviv (Hebrew: ) is a large city in Israel. In December 2053, the city was destroyed by a terrorist nuclear weapon, irradiating the surrounding area, and possibly even the entire country.[1] The manual for Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel states the bombing of Tel Aviv happened in 2035.[2] The attacks on the city may be a reference to Nevil Shute’s 1957 post-apocalyptic novel On the Beach, in which Tel Aviv is bombed by unknown forces and becomes the second city to be destroyed during the nuclear war. Tel Aviv is mentioned only in the Fallout Bible and Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel Manual.

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July 26, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv

From the science lab to the beach, biology students share their perspective on life at NYU Tel Aviv. At NYU Tel Aviv, students experience life in one of the world’s most intriguing and multidimensional cities. A vibrant coastal metropolis on the Mediterranean, Tel Aviv is the cultural, financial, and technological center of Israel. Students explore this truly global city and acquire a sophisticated understanding of Israel, the Middle East and the interrelationships between cultures, political movements, and religious traditions. Students benefit from high caliber local professors who teach students in areas such as journalism, politics, Hebrew and Arabic. Students connect with local culture through experiential learning/internships, partnerships with a local university and excursions to surrounding areas in Israel.

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July 25, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv Pride – Wikipedia

Tel Aviv Pride (Hebrew: , Arabic: ) is an annual, week-long series of events in Tel Aviv that celebrate Israel’s LGBT community life, scheduled during the second week of June, as part of the international observance of Gay Pride Month. The most-attended event is Pride Parade.[citation needed] The first event that many consider to be the first ‘Pride’ event to take place in Israel was a protest in 1979 at Rabin Square. The event more closely associated with Tel Aviv Pride as it is known today was the Tel Aviv Love Parade in 1997. The parade assembles and begins at Meir Park, then travels along Bugrashov Street, Ben Yehuda Street and Ben Gurion Boulevard, and culminates in a party in Charles Clore Park on the seafront. There were 200,000 participants reported in 2016, making it one of the largest in the world.[2] The parade is the biggest pride celebration in continental Asia, drawing more than 200,000 people in 2017, approximately 30,000 of them tourists.[3] Tel Aviv was the first location in Israel where “gay” events were organised and also the first city in Israel to host a gay pride parade. In the early years of the Pride Parade, the majority of participants were politically motivated. Later on, as the Parade grew, people who took part came with the notion that the Parade should focus on LGBT rights, equality and equal representation, and should not be used as a stage for radical politics, which are not accepted by most of the Parade’s participants. Gradually, the Parade came to be less political due to the scale and diversity of participation. In recent years, the Parade’s reputation for inclusiveness, along with Tel Aviv’s world-class status as a gay-friendly destination and a top party city,[4] has attracted more than 100,000 participants, many of them from around the world. By 2000, the Parade had evolved from being a political demonstration and became more of a social-entertainment event and street celebration. The eleventh Tel Aviv Pride Parade, which took place in 2008, was accompanied by the opening of the LGBT Centre in Tel Aviv. This is the first municipal gay centre in Israel, whose purpose is to provide services specifically for members of the city’s LGBT community – such as health care, cultural events, meetings of different LGBT groups, a coffee shop, and many others. During the 2009 Pride Parade, which coincided with the centennial celebration of Tel Aviv’s historic establishment as a city, five same-sex couples got married in what was called “the wedding of the century” by the Israeli celebrity Gal Uchovsky. The parade on 10 June 2011 grew to an estimated 100,000 participants and included official representatives of LGBT groups from global companies such as Google and Microsoft. (Tel Aviv boasts one of the largest concentrations of hi-tech companies of any city in the world.)[5] In 2012, the parade attracted crowds exceeding 100,000, making it again the largest gay pride event in the Middle East and Asia. The event is advertised all around the world by the Israeli Tourism Ministry, marking the city of Tel Aviv as “the” premiere LGBT tourism destination.[6] For 2014, with an anticipated parade attendance of 150,000, a decision was made to move the after-parade beach party to Charles Clore Park (from Gordon Beach) for its much-larger space (the previous location could no longer accommodate the increasingly overwhelming crowds). The event was hosted by Israeli actress/supermodel Moran Attias, with performances by Israel’s transgender superstar Dana International, the Israeli representative for 2014’s Eurovision Song Contest Mei Feingold, and the Israeli actress/pop-rock star Ninet. In 2017, parade route was briefly blocked by protesters against Israeli occupation of Palestinian Territories. They built a mock separation wall with inscription – Theres no pride in occupation” and did not allow the parade from proceeding for several minutes. They were immediately dispersed by police who were present.[7] Template:Commons category inlne

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March 30, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

TEL AVIV | ISRAEL – A TRAVEL TOUR – HD 1080P – YouTube

A walking tour around the city of Tel Aviv, Israel. Official website and blog: http://globetrotteralpha.com/ Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobeTrotter… Check us out on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/globetrotte… Help me create the next travel videos by showing your support: https://www.patreon.com/globetrottera… The film chronologically progresses from morning to the small hours of the night, showcasing daily life around Tel Aviv. For those planning on visiting, those whod like to visit but cannot or those who might be nostalgic and want to re-live their past visits / life there, hopefully this film shall satisfy, time and time again. Filmed in December 2010. For more information on Tel Aviv:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Aviv Google Maps:https://www.google.com/maps/place/Tel… Filming Equipment: Cameras: – Sony HDR AX2000 – Sony Nex VG10 Camera Accessories: – Glidecam HD-2000 hand-held camera stabilization- Glidecam HD-4000 hand-held camera stabilization – Glidecam ‘Smooth Shooter’ body mounted camera stabilization system.- Sennheiser K6 module + ME66 shotgun microphone capsule. Editing Software:Sony Vegas Pro

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January 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Cheap Flights to Tel Aviv from USA and Canada | WOW air

Tel Aviv is an icon of liberal, progressive Israel, where the LGBT community is welcomed and celebrated. The city also boasts 300 days of sunshine a year, great bars, exciting nightclubs, world-class restaurants and lively flea markets. Walking and biking is the preferred method of transportation in Tel Aviv, and with a three-mile-long beachside boardwalk, where you can cruise to your hearts desire, there is plenty of opportunities to enjoy the view. We recommend exploring the Neve Tzedek area or taking a stroll down Rothschild Boulevard, Tel Avivs main street. Both offer fascinating architecture, great restaurants, and a vibrant nightlife. Furthermore, a visit to the Sarona market is not to be missed. The once busy Old Tel Aviv Port has gone through major revitalization since being closed in the 1960s and has turned into one of the most popular entertainment districts of the city. Cozy cafs, trendy boutiques, delectable restaurants and seaside bars now rest on the wooden docks. This is the perfect place to spend a fun and relaxed evening. For sunbathers, the Gordon-Frishman Beach comes highly recommended. Located besideTel Avivs most popular hotel areas the beach has powdery sands and great views of the Mediterranean.

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January 17, 2018   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Tel Aviv & Jaffa – Jewish Virtual Library

Put simply, Tel Aviv is where the action is in Israel. The beaches are clean and fulll of white sand, the sea enticing, the nightclubs hopping, the shopping plentiful and the restaurants appetizing. During the day, stroll down the boardwalk-style promenade or on the beach itself. At dusk, catch the nightlife scene along Dizengoff Street. Meet up at the sculpture fountain created by the acclaimed Israeli artist Yaacov Agam and go to a club, or just hang out and people-watch from an outdoor cafe. Tel Aviv is also a good base for exploring the northern and southern Mediterranean coasts. Tel Aviv is the first all-Jewish city in modern times. Originally named Ahuzat Bayit, it was founded by 60 families in 1909 as a Jewish neighborhood near Jaffa. In 1910, the name was changed to Tel Aviv, meaning “hill of spring.” The name was taken from Ezekiel 3:15, “…and I came to the exiles at Tel Aviv,” and from a reference in Herzl’s novel Altneuland, in which he foresaw the future Jewish state as a socialist utopia. Most Jews were expelled from Jaffa and Tel Aviv by the Turks during World War I, but returned after the war when Britain received the mandate for Palestine. The population of Tel Aviv gradually swelled, particularly as Jews were stimulated to leave predominantly Arab Jaffa by unrest in the 1920s. Arab forces in Jaffa shelled Tel Aviv in 1948 prior to the beginning of the actual war. Jewish forces responded by capturing the city two days before declaring independence. The declaration was made in the home of the city’s mayor Meir Dizengoff. Because Jerusalem was occupied by Jordan after Israel became an independent state in 1948, the temporary capital and home of the government offices was in Tel Aviv. Several government offices remain there and Tel Aviv is still home to foreign diplomats from countries (including the U.S.) that don’t recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Today, Tel Aviv is Israel’s second largest city (after Jerusalem), with a population of 380,000, and among the big city problems it shares is traffic congestion. Things are more spread out in Tel Aviv than the smaller cities, but it’s still often easier — and faster — to travel by foot. Walk along the Orange Routes, for example, to get acquainted with the city. Though much of the city is a drab gray, many buildings, especially along Rothschild Boulevard, actually have an interesting architectural pedigree that can be traced to the Bauhaus architecture of pre-Nazi Germany. There are more than 5,000 Bauhaus buildings, the largest number in any one city in the world. In fact, the city’s outstanding universal value led UNESCO to recognize it as a World Heritage Site.” Tel Aviv is also known as, “The white city”, named so in account of the the bright colors of the building style: white, off-white, light yellow. There are over 1,500 buildings marked for historic conservation in Tel Aviv. Israel Fact Fifty percent of the polished diamonds in the world come from Israel. Tel Aviv is the country’s business and cultural center. The Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, founded in 1953, and the Diamond Exchange, are two of major economic institutions in the city. For the arts, the Habima National Theater is excellent and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra is world-class. The city also boasts several impressive museums and a top-flight university. Though no Sears Tower or Empire State Building, the Azrieli Tower is the citys tallest building, at 614 feet (the tallest in the country is Migdal Shaar Ayir in nearby Ramat Gan at 801 feet). Before the Observation Floor was opened to the public, Israels highest observation deck was the 433-foot-high rooftop of the Shalom Meir Tower, which had been Israels tallest building for 34 years. Due to terrorism threats, the Azrieli Towers mall, one of the busiest in Israel, is probably the worlds most secure shopping center. In addition to Dizengoff, other streets filled with shops, galleries and restaurants worth strolling are Allenby and Ben Yehuda streets. Off Rehov HaCarmel, for example, you’ll find an open-air market. If you walk north from Jaffa down the seashore for about an hour, you’ll reach the Tel Aviv port (Namal), a hip area of restaurants and clubs around the intersection of Dizengoff and Yirmiyahu streets. The Tel Aviv Museum on Sderot Shaul Hamelekh is home to magnificent works of art, particularly sculpture and paintings by local artists. Another popular museum is the home of Israel’s national poet Hayyim Nahman Bialik. A small, less visited museum is devoted to Nahum Gutman, one of Israel’s most well-known artists. David Ben-Gurion’s home in the center of Tel Aviv has also been turned into a museum. The modest digs are impressive because they show the simple way the country’s most powerful politician lived. Besides a collection of awards and gifts assembled in the house, his awesome library of 20,000 volumes remains intact, filling much of the upper floor of the house and testifying to the man’s thirst for knowledge. A less well known museum is the Haganah Museum on Sderot Rothschild. It was set up in the apartment of the founder of the Haganah, Eliyahu Golomb. Despite being one of the most wanted men in Palestine, the British never found Golomb’s home. Additions to the building now house collections of weapons and exhibits on the struggle for independence. One can’t miss attraction is Beth Hatefutsoth, the Museum of the Diaspora, on the campus of Tel Aviv University. It contains exhibits on the history of the Jewish people covering more than 2,500 years. The University itself is also a nice place to visit and a popular destination for foreign students spending time studying in Israel. Tel Aviv University is in the suburb of Ramat Aviv. Another academic institution, Bar Ilan University is in the suburb of Ramat Gan. Some of the other well-known neighborhoods in Tel Aviv include the Orthodox enclave of B’nei Brak, the “Beverly Hills” of Israel, Savyon, and one Israel’s earliest modern settlements, Petah Tikvah, which was founded in 1878. Another can’t miss museum, perhaps the most moving in Israel, is the Palmach Museum. You need a reservation, but it’s well worth it. Instead of walking through halls of exhibits, you follow a group of Palmachniks as they tell the story of their experiences during the fight for independence. The beautiful area of Neve tzedek (Oasis of Justice) was actually the first neighborhood of Tel Aviv. It was established in 1887 on land that belonged to a political activist named Aaron Shlush. You can still see his house as well as other old buildings representative of the architecture of the early days of settlement in Israel. Don’t miss the Suzanne Dellal Center for dance and theater, the home of the world famous BatSheva Dance Company. Neve Tzedek is the home of many artists whose works are displayed throughout the area. Pull up a chair at a sidewalk cafe and relax before continuing your tour. A few minutes walk from Neve Tzeded is the IDF museum. This is a collection of building that have exhibits on various IDF units, commanders and weapons. If you’re interested in firearms, this is the place for you. Next door is The Station, another place to shop and eat built the site of the first train station ever built in the Middle East in 1892. Replacing camels, the train took people and freight on the 35 mile journey from Jaffa to Jerusalem in just six hours. The station was no used after 1948 and was left in disrepair until opening as a museum and entertainment complex in 2010. Jaffa has been a fortified port city overlooking the Mediterranean Sea for more than 4,000 years. It is one of the world’s most ancient towns. It has been the target of conquerors throughout the ages because of its strategic locations between Asia, Africa and Europe. Israel Fact According to the Bible, Jonah left from Jaffa on his fateful voyage before encountering the whale. Christians learn hat St. Peter miraculously restored life to Tabitha in Jaffa. Up until the early 20th century, when visitors came to Palestine, they usually arrived in Jaffa. The coast there is too rocky for ships to land, so they usually had to anchor offshore and send their passengers to the port in longboats and dinghies. Today, Jaffa is a popular tourist destination because of its beautifully restored old quarter filled with galleries, shops and restaurants. One of the few religious sites is the house of Simon the Tanner, where, according to the New Testament, Peter first realized the gospel message had to be extended beyond the confines of Judaism. You can walk from Tel Aviv, but it’s a good 40 minutes, and once you get past the strip of hotels not as well-trafficked, especially at night. The easiest spot to locate is Hagana Square where the clock tower stands. It was built in 1906 by the Turkish Sultan, Abdul Hamid II, to commemorate his 30th anniversary as ruler. If you head toward the minaret towering over the Mahmoudiya Mosque, you’ll find yourself in a Middle Eastern buffet, with cafes and kiosks selling all of the region’s delicacies. The Visitors’ Center in Kedumim Square has exhibits of archaeological remains and the history of Jaffa. The square is a good place to sit and have a picnic and people watch. At night, bands often play here. The streets off the square are lined with shops, nightclubs and cafes. The ancient port is now a modern sailing facility and a tourist attraction with restaurants and entertainment.

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January 15, 2018   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed

Lorde Cancels Tel Aviv Concert, Caves to Critics of Israel

Grammy winner Lorde has formally canceled her upcoming concert scheduled for Tel Aviv on June 5 after caving to anti-Israel activists and fans. We regret to announce the cancelation of the Lorde concert in Israel planned for June, the shows organizers told Israeli media outlet YNET (viaNew Zealand Media and Entertainment). The tickets already bought will be reimbursed within 14 business days. As to the circumstances that led to the cancellation of the show, Lorde is expected to publish a statement via Twitter soon. The singer released the following statement: hey guys, so about this israel show ive received an overwhelming number of messages & letters and have had a lot of discussions with people holding many views, and i think the right decision at this time is to cancel the show. i pride myself on being an informed young citizen, and i had done a lot of reading and sought a lot of opinions before deciding to book a show in tel aviv, but Im not too proud to admit i didnt make the right call on this one. tel aviv, its been a dream of mine to visit this beautiful part of the world for many years, and im truly sorry to reverse my commitment to come play for you. i hope one day we can all dance. L x Also Read: Lorde Predicted Fall of Powerful Men in Hollywood Almost a Year Ago: ‘This Came True I Guess’ IsraeliCulture Minister Miri Regev hoped Lorde would reverse her decision. Lorde, Im hoping you can be a pure heroine, like the title of your first album, be a heroine of pure culture, free from any foreign and ridiculous political considerations, she said. Lordeannounced her 2018 Melodrama world tourback in June. A performance was scheduled for the Tel Aviv Convention Centre on June 5, 2018 at 7 p.m. ActivistsNadia Abu-Shanab (Palestinian) and Justine Sachs (Jewish)wrote a joint letter to Lordethat called for her to cancel her Israel concert stop in protest of the countrys treatment of Palestinians. The 60th Grammy Awards nominations were a triumph for hip-hop — but beyond that, they embraced a few dark horses and ignored several favorites. Here’s the scorecard. SURPRISE: Jay-Z, the guy with the most nominations this year, eight, was recognized in major categories (Album of the Year, Song of the Year, Record of the Year) where he was not expected to be a big contender. SNUB: For the first time in three years, country music was shut out in the top categories, leaving the likes of Miranda Lambert and her The Weight of These Wings album out in the cold. SURPRISE: Julia Michaels, the only white artist in the Best New Artist category also made a surprise appearance in the Song of the Year category with Issues. SNUB: The pioneering rockers Metallica were thought to have a chance to crash the Album of the Year category with Hardwired To Self Destruct, but they ended up with a single nod in the Best Rock Song category. SNUB: James Arthur, Logic and Cardi B. were considered likelier Best New Artist nominees, but rapper Lil Uzi Vert grabbed the final slot. SNUB: Everybody thought Ed Sheerand be a lock for the top categories, but everybody was wrong — his album and song Shape of You shockingly landed a paltry two nominations in the pop categories. SURPRISE: Its not a surprise that the deep-voiced bard was nominated for his final album, but its delicious to find Leonard Cohen competing against Chris Cornell and Foo Fighters in the Best Rock Performance category, and against Alabama Shakes and Blind Boys of Alabama for Best American Roots Performance. SNUB: Lady Gaga was thought to be a Song of the Year contender for Million Reasons and an Album of the Year contender for Joanne, but couldnt get noms outside the pop categories. SURPRISE: Senator Bernie Sanders lost in the primaries but is now nominated for Best Spoken Word Album for Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In. This time, hes competing against Bruce Springsteen and Carrie Fisher. SNUB: Kesha did get two pop nominations for her album Rainbow and song Praying, but she had Song of the Year and Record of the Year aspirations. SURPRISE: Childish Gambino, the name used by actor Donald Glover in his musical career, wasnt expected to contend in the Album of the Year and Record of the Year categories, but his album Awaken My Love and song Redbone were both nominees. SNUB: We wont really know if Grammy voters have cooled on Taylor Swift until next year, when her album Reputation is eligible. But the singles Look What You Made Me Do was eligible, and it was shut out. Voters loved Julia Michaels, Childish Gambino and Bernie Sanders (!), but didnt embrace Tayor Swift, Lady Gaga or country music The 60th Grammy Awards nominations were a triumph for hip-hop — but beyond that, they embraced a few dark horses and ignored several favorites. Here’s the scorecard.

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December 23, 2017   Posted in: Tel Aviv  Comments Closed


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