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The Amazing Racist is a comedy routine done by Ari Shaffir, a Jewish would-be comedian. In the routine Ari protrays himself as a blatant racist in order to film people’s reactions..

The Amazing Racist is part of a DVD released by National Lampoons called “Lost Reality”, out in shops now. It includes this and other things that never made it on the air, such as “Porn Star Idol” and a show where people do absurd things such as being bribed to lick a tramp’s sweaty foot and many others.

The comedian has been ridiculed as a bad version of Comedian Tom Green, who originally founded “instigation-comedy” several years earlier.

Mel Brooks has be quoted as saying “I just don’t think he’s funny”. Woody Allen, upon seeing the skits, said “Creative. But funny?” Adam Sandler is quoted as saying “Who?”. Shaffir has been compared to Pauley Shore and Carrot Top in the internet variety source.

It should also be noted that everyone seen in his videos are willing participants, and that they have all signed release forms. According to other sources, in his Mexican video, the Mexican workers were actually paid to appear in the video.http://nationallampoon.com/movies/los…I WILL SAY THIS ONLY ONCEThis is comedy pure and simple,nobody gave a shit when Dave Chapelle was saying nigger this and nigger that.I do not support or condone racism in any way shape or form.Do not leave me any hate comments and bullshit on this video your comments will be removed and you will be reported to YouTube for harassmentThis video is property of National Lampoon Productions and it’s parent companies.

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Leno delights late show at Napa’s Uptown Theatre – Napa Valley Register

Jay Lenos late show at the Uptown Theatre on Saturday night was an extension of his former Tonight Show monologues. The former TV talk-show host had a night of one-liners, many of which catered to an older crowd, but still forced some smiles from audience members in their 20s and 30s among the nearly sold-out theatre.

Like a frog jumping lily pads, Leno hopped from topic to topic, throwing out zingers on the superiority of flip phones, the ridiculousness of competitive eating, and celebrity gossip.

One of his famous targets was singer Barry Manilow who recently opened up about being gay.

At least we know why Mandy left, Leno said, quickly moving on to jokes about Willie Nelsons marijuana use, Kim and Kanyes marriage, and Bill Cosbys statue being removed from Disney World. Although many of his jokes were seemingly timeless quips about American values (and diet), some were a little dated. For example, Cosbys statue was removed from Disney World in 2015.

The audience didnt seem to mind, though, and boisterous laughter filled the theater. His biggest hit, of course, was his few minutes of joking about President Donald Trump.

He started his political bit by poking fun at former CIA director General David Petraeus, saying something like If he cant keep an affair secret, what chance do you have?

Next was a joke about Trumps newest reality show called The Amazing Racist. Leno nearly let that be the end of the Trump jokes, but then went on to make fun of his intelligence, saying that the only reason why Ben Carson endorsed him was because, as a pediatric neurosurgeon, he was used to working with tiny brains.

The comparison won him a round of applause. It was, by far, his best joke of the night.

After sweeping through some other political figures, Leno continued his one-liners until arriving at a his longest bit about women, men, cats and dogs.

Leno outlined how a man will act like they like a womans cat because he knows he has too, but really he prefers dogs. Why?

A dog will pretend to be interested while a man is talking. Women wont do that, he said.

On the flip side, he said, Everything women hate about a man, they love about a cat. Cats can go out for days and when they come back, he said, they are gifted with better food. When men leave on Friday and dont come back until Monday, they dont get that treatment, Leno said.

Toward the end of the night, Leno finally shared some short, but personal stories. He discussed what it was like performing in clubs run by the Mafia, being raised by a Scottish mother and how his wife never wants to accompany him to get the mail for fear that her photo will be taken.

His last task was to share some jokes to go with the crowd. Then he signed off in the same voice he had signed off with on the Tonight Show.

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Leno delights late show at Napa’s Uptown Theatre – Napa Valley Register

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As Nasty as they wanna be – Cult MTL

Godfrey

With political correctness on the upswing againstthe worlds current political climate, what better time than now to see a group of foul-mouthed comedians go up against it? This week saw the commencement of Just for Laughs fan-favourite series The Nasty Show, an 18+ event thats far from being mature.

From the joys of having a black penis (Godfrey), having sex with a black penis (Yamaneika Saunders), to insecurities surrounding a lack of a black penis (Ari Shaffir and Big Jay Oakerson), The Nasty Show has it all. Much like its sister series, The Ethnic Show, the line-up simply never flops. An endless stream of insanity flows throughout Metropolis for the entirety of the evening, the term off limits seemingly foreign to the comics on the bill.

The series is hosted by The Amazing Racist himself, Ari Shaffir, a man whose past antics include offering driving lessons to Asian-only students, and taking unsuspecting, undocumented Mexicans to an immigration office. Shaffir, a former Orthodox Jew, thoroughly maintains his shock-value methods throughout the show, opening with thetheory thatGod caused the flooding of the world as depicted in Noahs Ark as a punishment for the worlds anal sex craze.

Jimmy Carr

Taking on hosting responsibilities meant Shaffir would be filling the shoes of Quebecs nastiest, Mike Ward. Shaffirs humour generally proves to be more clever, though he fails to capture the same charisma Ward delivers with his hometown audience.

Jimmy Carr, arguably the only big-name talent on the bill, supplied a set of strictly zingers, supplying fun facts about Montreal only to downplay every one of them with a vicious punchline. Jokes about the late pedophile Ren Anglil were surprisingly plentiful, perhaps the only moment of disapproval seen by the (seemingly Celine- loving) audience throughout the entire evening.

Despite the lack of big names (the 2015 edition had Artie Lang and Gilbert Gottfried), The Nasty Show still provides delightfully twisted big laughs from an array of talent. A series like this is perfect for any first date, if your goal is to show your crush just how depraved you truly are.

The Nasty Show continues at Metropolis (59 Ste-Catherine E.) through July 29, $49.99$60.49

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As Nasty as they wanna be – Cult MTL

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

‘Ari Shaffir: Double Negative’ Makes For A Positively Audacious Netflix Debut – Decider

In this age of comedy excess, whod be audacious enough first to push it farther by releasing two comedy specials simultaneously?

While Dave Chappelle seemingly fits that bill, his two-special collection released earlier in 2017 doesnt quite qualify, as Chappelle had recorded and held onto both Deep In The Heart of Texas and The Age of Spin for a year or two before Netflix came calling and convinced him with cash to release both at once.

No, if its audacious you seek, look no further than the guy who dropped his pants in his first stand-up performance on TV. The guy who called himself The Amazing Racist for a recurring prank segment that the Sham-Wow guy included in his bad and bonkers movie, InAPPropriate Comedy. The guy who found one of his otherwise innocuous jokes at the flashpoint that exposed Carlos Mencias joke thievery. The guy whose comedy storytelling series became a Comedy Central webseries, and later a late-night TV show, only to lose it this year when he sold his new double-special to Netflix instead.

That guy is Ari Shaffir, ladies and germs. ShaffirsDouble Negative collection includes a 44-minute set called Children, followed by a 47-minute called Adulthood;both filmed on the same night at Cap City Comedy Club in Austin. Shaffir took only a brief intermission to change his wardrobe and the lighting, keeping the same crowd in the house.

Shaffir cited Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, the 1995 double-disc collection from The Smashing Pumkpins, as inspiration for him splitting his act thematically into two separate works, and Ayn Rands The Fountainhead in his end credits for freeing me as an artist.

If you know that going in, it might help you connect with Shaffirs life philosophy that children are garbage and that hell fail to follow the advice of his schools guidance counselors to apply myself. Or you could just look at the squint in his eyes and hear him describe how stoned he is, and how stoned he gets, and figure out how his laissez-faire libertarian outlook extends to his extended immaturity in adulthood.

When Louis C.K. namechecked Todd Glass on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, it was a for bit he didnt include on 2017 from his encores in which he jokingly uses Glass as a sounding board. When Shaffir namechecks a fellow comedian, its almost always very intimate and possibly embarrassing. He did that on his first stand-up special, and does so again in his Children set. This time, Shaffir is calling out one of his comedian friends for having a baby with a woman he barely knew, and not taking Shaffirs advice to get an abortion instead.By the way, nobody asks a married couple, What are you going to do? he jokes. Shaffir doesnt want to have kids himself, nor is he a fan of them in general and especially not if theyre accompanying their parents at places typically reserved for adults. Like a fancy restaurant. Or Bonnaroo. Or Oktoberfest in Germany. He realizes this routine generally finds him falling out of favor with any moms in his audience, but thats not going to stop him from feeling nauseous if he has to watch your babies on a cell-phone video.I feel like Im Dexter and I have to fake the emotion, he says. A running thread through the Children episode hinges upon another friend of Shaffirs who got pregnant from a single Tinder date, and whether she heeds his advice or not.

In Adulthood, meanwhile, Shaffir rejoices in all of the behaviors he can continue to indulge in since he doesnt have children of his own. Even if it results in STDs or worse for his genitalia. He also drops a double negative reference in the beginning of this set, addressing a 1994 track from The Notorious B.I.G. in which he dedicates his rap to all the teachers that told me Id never amount to nothin. Shaffir follows that lyric literally down a rabbit hole, before coming back to his own life, and how he avoided becoming a smart adult by smoking a lot of pot. Which eventually finds him traveling to Amsterdam, where a grilled-cheese eatery is more fascinating to him than the Anne Frank House next door.

Shaffir tries to relate young Annes legacy to contemporary times, good taste be damned. Which he fully realizes, too, saying:I can already tell you guys are not going to go with me on this.

But Shaffir will go farther yet, using a story about one of his gay college friends and doubling-down on it with a more recent trip Shaffir took to Thailand to explain why he thinks he may be homophobic.

Because after all of his sexual adventures and misadventures, if not evenThe Thai ladyboy, which Shaffir jokes is like the 92 Dream Team of transsexuals, cannot seduce him successfully, then what hope does he have for expanding his own sexuality?

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Maybe when Shaffir finally matures into full adulthood, hell have sorted that all out.

Sean L. McCarthy works the comedy beat for his own digital newspaper, The Comics Comic; before that, for actual newspapers. Based in NYC but will travel anywhere for the scoop: Ice cream or news. He also tweets @thecomicscomic and podcasts half-hour episodes with comedians revealing origin stories: The Comics Comic Presents Last Things First.

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‘Ari Shaffir: Double Negative’ Makes For A Positively Audacious Netflix Debut – Decider

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

Loyal Stalkers, Chimmi Tenduf-La’s new collection of interlinked short stories, is grim but gripping – India Today

Loyal Stalkers, Chimmi Tenduf-La’s new collection of interlinked short stories, is a far cry from The Amazing Racist, the Sri Lankan author’s much-admired debut novel. Portraying a mixed marriage between an English man and a Sri Lankan woman, Tenduf-La’snovel was funny despite its grave themes. His latest work is much darker.

Nevertheless, his most serious tales reveal a dash of cheerfulness that marks him as a unique writer. A stark contrast between subject and style means he risked the collection being dismissed as superficial. Curiously enough, this peculiarity heightens the darkness and makes the narrative more hard-hitting.

The 15 stories evoke a thousand emotions simultaneously. The ‘happier’ ones such as ‘Lovable Idiot’, ‘My Fair and Lovely Lady’, and ‘Everyone Has to Eat’, have a somewhat R.K. Narayan-like feel despite a shadow of melancholy in the background. Others are simply disconcerting. In the title story, ‘Loyal Stalker’, for instance, Chin-up Channa is a gym instructor obsessed with his beautiful rich client. He first follows her abroad and then takes to living in her house like a phantom, watching, observing, and acting on her behalf-all without her knowledge.

‘The Dog Thrown Off a Building’, probably inspired by a recent real-life incident in India, is equally disturbing, but with a twist towards the end. ‘White Knight’, ‘Devil Mask Tattoo’ and ‘TukTuk Bang’ create the same creepy feeling and sense of anticipation as the psychological crime novels by Britain’s Ruth Rendell. As the title points out, there isn’t one stalker in this book but several. Tenduf-La surprises over and over again convincingly. Meanwhile, the larger plot that links the stories together develops subtly, almost imperceptibly, and unfolds only towards the end.

His insistence on the fairness of his women characters is a bit off-putting. But Tenduf-La’s characters throb with life: the cricket coach (Coach Uncle); Jinesena, the security guard at Monsoon Lodge; Pasindu Amarasinghe, the young cricketer with an overzealous mother; Kiyoma, the battered maid soldiering on in her life. Overall, a brilliant collection, one of the few to appear in quite some time.

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Loyal Stalkers, Chimmi Tenduf-La’s new collection of interlinked short stories, is grim but gripping – India Today

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

India is the new publishing haven for writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka. Here’s why – Hindustan Times

Indian publishing houses are fast becoming the preferred choice of writers from the neighbouring countries, with an increasing number of manuscripts from Pakistan and Sri Lanka doing well in India.

Yet, it is a tale of many contrasts. Many of the manuscripts were originally rejected in their home countries while they attracted curious attention from Indian publishers. Authors say Indian publishers are more open to experimentation with content, which makes getting published in India a lot easier.

I found Indian editors much more understanding and supportive of the kind of narrative I wanted to write than those in the West. I think the fact that both Indians and Pakistanis live in nuanced societies struggling with modernity helps in debunking the exotic east or terrorist-Muslim kind of stereotypes that seem to form the expectations of Western publishers, says Sabyn Javeri.

Javeris first book Nobody Killed Her was published in India by HarperCollins in March. Its a thriller based on the assassination of a political leader in Pakistan. She says Indian publishers stick to their commitment and seldom flip flop on a decision regarding a manuscript. Her book, she explains, was first acquired by a major international publisher but was later dropped. She said shes glad that editors in India did not stop backing it till it took its final shape a full-fledged book. Javeri says in a booming industry, Indian publishers are at a juncture where they can afford to experiment with content, genre and writers, even as book sales were on the decline in the rest of the world.

Javeri is just one of the many authors from Pakistan whose manuscripts have found a home in India. Haroon Khalid, whose first book A White Trail: A Journey Into the Heart of Pakistans Religious Minorities (Westland) too first found acceptance in India, and he has published two more books in this country since.

If I was publishing in Pakistan, there certainly would be some parts publishers would not publish. Publishers here (in Pakistan) can be a little more particular about what can be written and what not, says Khalid.

They (the publishing houses in Pakistan) are choosy and tend to avoid controversial stuff. There are certain topics that writers and publishers now know they can never talk about, given the events in the past few years, Khalid says.

His second book In Search of Shiva: A Study of Folk Religious Practices (Rupa) was released in 2015 and his latest book Walking with Nanak has again been published by Westland.

The small number of publishers in Pakistan, Khalid notes, is also a strong reason behind Indian publishing houses attracting more and more Pakistani authors.

Javeri says publishing houses in Pakistan often ask authors to sign a legal undertaking that there is nothing defamatory or blasphemous or anti-national before being allowed to publish. I think the whole idea of censoring is restrictive to art, Javeri maintains.

But what is the real driving force behind this immense interest in authors from the subcontinent to Indian publishers? One possible reason is the similar culture and traditions make it easier for a Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Sri Lankan author to connect with his or her readers in India.

Sri Lanka-based author Chhimi Tenduf-La explains, The reviews and feedback I have got from India suggest that there is not much difference between what an Indian and a Sri Lankan audience likes. The lives, culture, class divides and respect for elders are all similar. They have had no issue in connecting.

Chhimis first book The Amazing Racist was published by Hachette India in 2015. His latest book Loyal Stalkers, published by Pan MacMillan, was released earlier this year. I felt that an Indian audience may understand my stories, set in Sri Lanka, without me having to hold their hands, Chhimi says. He says he didnt submit or contact any publisher based in Sri Lanka as he preferred to get rejected by publishers not from his country.

There are other reasons for seeking publishing abroad. We dont offer advances to authors as we cant afford them. Our books are mostly found in local bookshops as well as in countries like Australia, Singapore and the UK, says Sam Perera, of a Sri-Lanka based publishing house Perera-Hussein.

The Indian book market is also much larger than any of those in the neighbouring countries. A shared history often helps to attract the interest of readers. There is a similar cultural sensibility and a mutual understanding of the cultural subtext that runs through our two countries, Javeri says.

Thats true for other countries in the region as well.

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India is the new publishing haven for writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka. Here’s why – Hindustan Times

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June 21, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

Writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka find publishing haven in India – Daijiworld.com

By Somrita Ghosh

New Delhi, Jun 20 (IANS): Indian publishing houses are fast becoming the preferred choice of writers from the neighbouring countries, with an increasing number of manuscripts from Pakistan and Sri Lanka doing well in India.

Yet, it is a tale of many contrasts. Many of the manuscripts were originally rejected in their home countries while they attracted curious attention from Indian publishers. The editors at these publishing houses say that being more open to experimentation with content, the journey of authors from countries like Pakistan and Sri Lanka becomes much easier.

“I found Indian editors much more understanding and supportive of the kind of narrative I wanted to write than those in the West. I think the fact that both Indians and Pakistanis live in nuanced societies struggling with modernity helps in debunking the exotic east or terrorist-Muslim kind of stereotypes that seem to form the expectations of Western publishers,” Sabyn Javeri told IANS in an email conversation from Pakistan.

Javeri has just published her first book “Nobody Killed Her” in India by HarperCollins. It’s a thriller based on political assassination of a leader, underlying the violent history in the subcontinent.

She says Indian publishers stick to their commitment and seldom flip flop on a decision regarding a manuscript. Her book, she claimed, was first acquired by a major international publisher but was later dropped. She expressed her happiness over the fact that “editors in India did not stop backing it” till it took its final shape — a full-fledged book.

She said in a booming industry, Indian publishers are at a juncture where they can afford to experiment with content, genre and writers, even as book sales were on the decline in the rest of the world.

Javeri’s book received critical acclaim in India. But she is just one of the many authors from Pakistan whose manuscripts have found a home in india. Haroon Khalid, whose first book “A White Trail: A Journey Into the Heart of Pakistan’s Religious Minorities” (Westland) too first found acceptance in India, has published two more books in this country.

“If I was publishing in Pakistan, there certainly would be some parts publishers would not publish. Publishers here (in Pakistan) can be a little more particular about what can be written and what not,” said Khalid in email answers.

“They (the publishing houses in Pakistan) are choosy and tend to avoid controversial stuff. There are certain topics that writers and publishers now know they can never talk about, given the events in the past few years,” Khalid responded to a question.

His second book “In Search of Shiva: A Study of Folk Religious Practices” (Rupa) was released in 2015 and his latest book “Walking with Nanak” has again been published by Westland.

The small number of publishers in Pakistan, Khalid noted, is a strong reason behind Indian publishing houses attracting more and more Pakistani authors.

Javeri also said that the publishing houses in Pakistan often ask authors to sign a legal undertaking that there is nothing defamatory or blasphemous or anti-national before being allowed to publish.

“I think the whole idea of censoring is restrictive to art,” Javeri maintained.

But what is the real driving force behind this immense interest in authors from the subcontinent to Indian publishers?

One possible reason is the similar culture and traditions make it easier for a Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Sri Lankan author to connect with his or her readers in India.

“The reviews and feedback I have got from India suggest that there is not much difference between what an Indian and a Sri Lankan audience likes. The lives, culture, class divides and respect for elders are all similar. They have had no issue in connecting,” says Sri Lanka-based author Chhimi Tenduf-La.

Chhimi’s first book “The Amazing Racist” was published by Hachette India in 2015. His latest book “Loyal Stalkers”, published by Pan MacMillan, was released this year. “I felt that an Indian audience may understand my stories, set in Sri Lanka, without me having to hold their hands,” Chhimi said. He said he didn’t submit or contact any publisher based in Sri Lanka as he “preferred to get rejected by publishers not from his country.”

There are other reasons for seeking publishing abroad. “We don’t offer advances to authors as we can’t afford them. Our books are mostly found in local bookshops as well as in countries like Australia, Singapore and the UK,” said Sam Perera, Precedent Partner, of a Sri Lanka based publishing house ‘Perera-Hussein’.

The Indian book market is also much larger than any of those in the neighbouring countries. A shared history often helps to attract the interest of readers. “There is a similar cultural sensibility and a mutual understanding of the cultural subtext that runs through our two countries,” Javeri said.

That’s true for other countries in the region too.

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Writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka find publishing haven in India – Daijiworld.com

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June 20, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

Ari Shaffir – Wikipedia

Ari Shaffir

Shaffir performing in July 2016.

Ari Shaffir (born February 12, 1974) is an American comedian, actor, podcaster, writer and producer. He is the producer and host of his podcast, Skeptic Tank, and the stand up comedy web and television series This Is Not Happening on Comedy Central. He also co-hosts the podcast Punch Drunk Sports with Jayson Thibault and Sam Tripoli, and is a regular guest on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast.

Shaffir was born in New York City, and was raised as an Orthodox Jew.[1] His father and grandmother were Holocaust survivors.[2][3] Soon after his birth, his family moved to North Carolina, followed by Maryland.[4][5] He attended high school in Rockville, Maryland, followed by time at Yeshiva University in New York City,[6] where he accepted to study abroad in seminary in Israel for around three-and-a-half years. He added: “There was no test, there was nothing to memorize, so I just poured myself into it … one day I realized I didn’t really believe any of that stuff, so I stopped it.”[7] In 1999, Shaffir graduated from University of Maryland.[8]

Following his graduation from university, Shaffir moved to Los Angeles to improve his chances of success as a stand up comedian.[8] He took up work answering the phones at The Comedy Store, which led to positions in the cover booth and “the door”, until owner Mitzi Shore made him a paid regular, four-and-a-half years later.[4] His early influences in comedy include watching showcase comedy shows on television as a youngster and comedians on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.[9] He cites Bill Burr as his favorite living comedian.[10] Shaffir’s first and only comedy performance on stage before he moved to Los Angeles took place in his early twenties at an open mic night at a “sports comedy place in Northern Virginia”.[4]

Shaffir first became known for his viral video series The Amazing Racist[5] that fans uploaded onto YouTube that he originally shot for a DVD produced by National Lampoon, but was commercially unsuccessful.[7] In 2013, Shaffir created and produced This Is Not Happening, a stand up comedy web series featuring numerous comedians telling true life stories. The show was initially rejected for television broadcast as Shaffir was too unknown, but it was later picked up by Comedy Central which premiered in January 2015.[11] Later that year, Shaffir performed at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.[9]

In 2009, Shaffir acquired a license to use marijuana in California.[4]

In 2011, Shaffir began his podcast, Skeptic Tank.[12] In 2013, Shaffir began to cohost the sports podcast Punch Drunk Sports with fellow comedians Sam Tripoli and Jayson Thibault.[13]

Shaffir appeared in the comedy feature film Keeping Up with the Joneses (2016).[14] January 4th 2017 Shaffir lost contact with his friends and social media to travel the world for four months. Being burnt out by his brief popularity, left Hollywood for New York.

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Clap Clap Boom – NY Blueprint

Comedian and actor Ari Shaffir,who was raised Orthodox and attended Yeshiva University, describes his comedy as a puppet show, but way filthier and without the puppets. He was a featured standup on the HBO comedy series Down and Dirty with Jim Norton and performed at the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal and Toronto, the San Francisco SketchFest, and the Bridgetown Comedy Festival in Portland. Shaffirs satirical shorts The Amazing Racist for National Lampoon went viral on the Internet with millions of views. Additionally, he has appeared on TBSs Conan, Comedy Centrals Jon Benjamin Has A Van, ESPN Classics Cheap Seats, and dozens of national commercials. Aris podcast is called The Skeptic Tank and he is a regular guest on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast.

Derek Gaines started in the vicious comedy clubs of Philadelphia and then began to move around the tri-state area (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York), working and still working on what he would like to call the “Left field crusader show,”the style of comedy that speaks to all but touches the very hearts of the Black, “can’t-be-a-thug suburbanite only children” of the US.

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Clap Clap Boom – NY Blueprint

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The Amazing Racist – Ari nearly gets killed LOL! – SUB FOR …

We are giving away 5 AMD Ryzen 1800x processors May 1st – All you have to do is subscribe to enter the drawing Like Comment & Subscribe for more epic videos The Amazing Racist is a comedy routine done by Ari Shaffir, a Jewish would-be comedian. In the routine Ari protrays himself as a blatant racist in order to film people’s reactions.. The Amazing Racist is part of a DVD released by National Lampoons called “Lost Reality”, out in shops now. It includes this and other things that never made it on the air, such as “Porn Star Idol” and a show where people do absurd things such as being bribed to lick a tramp’s sweaty foot and many others. The comedian has been ridiculed as a bad version of Comedian Tom Green, who originally founded “instigation-comedy” several years earlier. Mel Brooks has be quoted as saying “I just don’t think he’s funny”. Woody Allen, upon seeing the skits, said “Creative. But funny?” Adam Sandler is quoted as saying “Who?”. Shaffir has been compared to Pauley Shore and Carrot Top in the internet variety source. It should also be noted that everyone seen in his videos are willing participants, and that they have all signed release forms. According to other sources, in his Mexican video, the Mexican workers were actually paid to appear in the video.http://nationallampoon.com/movies/los…I WILL SAY THIS ONLY ONCEThis is comedy pure and simple,nobody gave a shit when Dave Chapelle was saying nigger this and nigger that.I do not support or condone racism in any way shape or form.Do not leave me any hate comments and bullshit on this video your comments will be removed and you will be reported to YouTube for harassmentThis video is property of National Lampoon Productions and it’s parent companies. More Info – Buy the video here http://nationallampoon.com/movies/los…

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November 25, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

Leno delights late show at Napa’s Uptown Theatre – Napa Valley Register

Jay Lenos late show at the Uptown Theatre on Saturday night was an extension of his former Tonight Show monologues. The former TV talk-show host had a night of one-liners, many of which catered to an older crowd, but still forced some smiles from audience members in their 20s and 30s among the nearly sold-out theatre. Like a frog jumping lily pads, Leno hopped from topic to topic, throwing out zingers on the superiority of flip phones, the ridiculousness of competitive eating, and celebrity gossip. One of his famous targets was singer Barry Manilow who recently opened up about being gay. At least we know why Mandy left, Leno said, quickly moving on to jokes about Willie Nelsons marijuana use, Kim and Kanyes marriage, and Bill Cosbys statue being removed from Disney World. Although many of his jokes were seemingly timeless quips about American values (and diet), some were a little dated. For example, Cosbys statue was removed from Disney World in 2015. The audience didnt seem to mind, though, and boisterous laughter filled the theater. His biggest hit, of course, was his few minutes of joking about President Donald Trump. He started his political bit by poking fun at former CIA director General David Petraeus, saying something like If he cant keep an affair secret, what chance do you have? Next was a joke about Trumps newest reality show called The Amazing Racist. Leno nearly let that be the end of the Trump jokes, but then went on to make fun of his intelligence, saying that the only reason why Ben Carson endorsed him was because, as a pediatric neurosurgeon, he was used to working with tiny brains. The comparison won him a round of applause. It was, by far, his best joke of the night. After sweeping through some other political figures, Leno continued his one-liners until arriving at a his longest bit about women, men, cats and dogs. Leno outlined how a man will act like they like a womans cat because he knows he has too, but really he prefers dogs. Why? A dog will pretend to be interested while a man is talking. Women wont do that, he said. On the flip side, he said, Everything women hate about a man, they love about a cat. Cats can go out for days and when they come back, he said, they are gifted with better food. When men leave on Friday and dont come back until Monday, they dont get that treatment, Leno said. Toward the end of the night, Leno finally shared some short, but personal stories. He discussed what it was like performing in clubs run by the Mafia, being raised by a Scottish mother and how his wife never wants to accompany him to get the mail for fear that her photo will be taken. His last task was to share some jokes to go with the crowd. Then he signed off in the same voice he had signed off with on the Tonight Show.

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As Nasty as they wanna be – Cult MTL

Godfrey With political correctness on the upswing againstthe worlds current political climate, what better time than now to see a group of foul-mouthed comedians go up against it? This week saw the commencement of Just for Laughs fan-favourite series The Nasty Show, an 18+ event thats far from being mature. From the joys of having a black penis (Godfrey), having sex with a black penis (Yamaneika Saunders), to insecurities surrounding a lack of a black penis (Ari Shaffir and Big Jay Oakerson), The Nasty Show has it all. Much like its sister series, The Ethnic Show, the line-up simply never flops. An endless stream of insanity flows throughout Metropolis for the entirety of the evening, the term off limits seemingly foreign to the comics on the bill. The series is hosted by The Amazing Racist himself, Ari Shaffir, a man whose past antics include offering driving lessons to Asian-only students, and taking unsuspecting, undocumented Mexicans to an immigration office. Shaffir, a former Orthodox Jew, thoroughly maintains his shock-value methods throughout the show, opening with thetheory thatGod caused the flooding of the world as depicted in Noahs Ark as a punishment for the worlds anal sex craze. Jimmy Carr Taking on hosting responsibilities meant Shaffir would be filling the shoes of Quebecs nastiest, Mike Ward. Shaffirs humour generally proves to be more clever, though he fails to capture the same charisma Ward delivers with his hometown audience. Jimmy Carr, arguably the only big-name talent on the bill, supplied a set of strictly zingers, supplying fun facts about Montreal only to downplay every one of them with a vicious punchline. Jokes about the late pedophile Ren Anglil were surprisingly plentiful, perhaps the only moment of disapproval seen by the (seemingly Celine- loving) audience throughout the entire evening. Despite the lack of big names (the 2015 edition had Artie Lang and Gilbert Gottfried), The Nasty Show still provides delightfully twisted big laughs from an array of talent. A series like this is perfect for any first date, if your goal is to show your crush just how depraved you truly are. The Nasty Show continues at Metropolis (59 Ste-Catherine E.) through July 29, $49.99$60.49

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

‘Ari Shaffir: Double Negative’ Makes For A Positively Audacious Netflix Debut – Decider

In this age of comedy excess, whod be audacious enough first to push it farther by releasing two comedy specials simultaneously? While Dave Chappelle seemingly fits that bill, his two-special collection released earlier in 2017 doesnt quite qualify, as Chappelle had recorded and held onto both Deep In The Heart of Texas and The Age of Spin for a year or two before Netflix came calling and convinced him with cash to release both at once. No, if its audacious you seek, look no further than the guy who dropped his pants in his first stand-up performance on TV. The guy who called himself The Amazing Racist for a recurring prank segment that the Sham-Wow guy included in his bad and bonkers movie, InAPPropriate Comedy. The guy who found one of his otherwise innocuous jokes at the flashpoint that exposed Carlos Mencias joke thievery. The guy whose comedy storytelling series became a Comedy Central webseries, and later a late-night TV show, only to lose it this year when he sold his new double-special to Netflix instead. That guy is Ari Shaffir, ladies and germs. ShaffirsDouble Negative collection includes a 44-minute set called Children, followed by a 47-minute called Adulthood;both filmed on the same night at Cap City Comedy Club in Austin. Shaffir took only a brief intermission to change his wardrobe and the lighting, keeping the same crowd in the house. Shaffir cited Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, the 1995 double-disc collection from The Smashing Pumkpins, as inspiration for him splitting his act thematically into two separate works, and Ayn Rands The Fountainhead in his end credits for freeing me as an artist. If you know that going in, it might help you connect with Shaffirs life philosophy that children are garbage and that hell fail to follow the advice of his schools guidance counselors to apply myself. Or you could just look at the squint in his eyes and hear him describe how stoned he is, and how stoned he gets, and figure out how his laissez-faire libertarian outlook extends to his extended immaturity in adulthood. When Louis C.K. namechecked Todd Glass on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, it was a for bit he didnt include on 2017 from his encores in which he jokingly uses Glass as a sounding board. When Shaffir namechecks a fellow comedian, its almost always very intimate and possibly embarrassing. He did that on his first stand-up special, and does so again in his Children set. This time, Shaffir is calling out one of his comedian friends for having a baby with a woman he barely knew, and not taking Shaffirs advice to get an abortion instead.By the way, nobody asks a married couple, What are you going to do? he jokes. Shaffir doesnt want to have kids himself, nor is he a fan of them in general and especially not if theyre accompanying their parents at places typically reserved for adults. Like a fancy restaurant. Or Bonnaroo. Or Oktoberfest in Germany. He realizes this routine generally finds him falling out of favor with any moms in his audience, but thats not going to stop him from feeling nauseous if he has to watch your babies on a cell-phone video.I feel like Im Dexter and I have to fake the emotion, he says. A running thread through the Children episode hinges upon another friend of Shaffirs who got pregnant from a single Tinder date, and whether she heeds his advice or not. In Adulthood, meanwhile, Shaffir rejoices in all of the behaviors he can continue to indulge in since he doesnt have children of his own. Even if it results in STDs or worse for his genitalia. He also drops a double negative reference in the beginning of this set, addressing a 1994 track from The Notorious B.I.G. in which he dedicates his rap to all the teachers that told me Id never amount to nothin. Shaffir follows that lyric literally down a rabbit hole, before coming back to his own life, and how he avoided becoming a smart adult by smoking a lot of pot. Which eventually finds him traveling to Amsterdam, where a grilled-cheese eatery is more fascinating to him than the Anne Frank House next door. Shaffir tries to relate young Annes legacy to contemporary times, good taste be damned. Which he fully realizes, too, saying:I can already tell you guys are not going to go with me on this. But Shaffir will go farther yet, using a story about one of his gay college friends and doubling-down on it with a more recent trip Shaffir took to Thailand to explain why he thinks he may be homophobic. Because after all of his sexual adventures and misadventures, if not evenThe Thai ladyboy, which Shaffir jokes is like the 92 Dream Team of transsexuals, cannot seduce him successfully, then what hope does he have for expanding his own sexuality? Pop-Up Newsletter Stay up to date with news, recaps, theories & more with our weekly, season-long email. Maybe when Shaffir finally matures into full adulthood, hell have sorted that all out. Sean L. McCarthy works the comedy beat for his own digital newspaper, The Comics Comic; before that, for actual newspapers. Based in NYC but will travel anywhere for the scoop: Ice cream or news. He also tweets @thecomicscomic and podcasts half-hour episodes with comedians revealing origin stories: The Comics Comic Presents Last Things First. Watch Ari Shaffir: Double Negative on Netflix

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Loyal Stalkers, Chimmi Tenduf-La’s new collection of interlinked short stories, is grim but gripping – India Today

Loyal Stalkers, Chimmi Tenduf-La’s new collection of interlinked short stories, is a far cry from The Amazing Racist, the Sri Lankan author’s much-admired debut novel. Portraying a mixed marriage between an English man and a Sri Lankan woman, Tenduf-La’snovel was funny despite its grave themes. His latest work is much darker. Nevertheless, his most serious tales reveal a dash of cheerfulness that marks him as a unique writer. A stark contrast between subject and style means he risked the collection being dismissed as superficial. Curiously enough, this peculiarity heightens the darkness and makes the narrative more hard-hitting. The 15 stories evoke a thousand emotions simultaneously. The ‘happier’ ones such as ‘Lovable Idiot’, ‘My Fair and Lovely Lady’, and ‘Everyone Has to Eat’, have a somewhat R.K. Narayan-like feel despite a shadow of melancholy in the background. Others are simply disconcerting. In the title story, ‘Loyal Stalker’, for instance, Chin-up Channa is a gym instructor obsessed with his beautiful rich client. He first follows her abroad and then takes to living in her house like a phantom, watching, observing, and acting on her behalf-all without her knowledge. ‘The Dog Thrown Off a Building’, probably inspired by a recent real-life incident in India, is equally disturbing, but with a twist towards the end. ‘White Knight’, ‘Devil Mask Tattoo’ and ‘TukTuk Bang’ create the same creepy feeling and sense of anticipation as the psychological crime novels by Britain’s Ruth Rendell. As the title points out, there isn’t one stalker in this book but several. Tenduf-La surprises over and over again convincingly. Meanwhile, the larger plot that links the stories together develops subtly, almost imperceptibly, and unfolds only towards the end. His insistence on the fairness of his women characters is a bit off-putting. But Tenduf-La’s characters throb with life: the cricket coach (Coach Uncle); Jinesena, the security guard at Monsoon Lodge; Pasindu Amarasinghe, the young cricketer with an overzealous mother; Kiyoma, the battered maid soldiering on in her life. Overall, a brilliant collection, one of the few to appear in quite some time. Watchlist

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India is the new publishing haven for writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka. Here’s why – Hindustan Times

Indian publishing houses are fast becoming the preferred choice of writers from the neighbouring countries, with an increasing number of manuscripts from Pakistan and Sri Lanka doing well in India. Yet, it is a tale of many contrasts. Many of the manuscripts were originally rejected in their home countries while they attracted curious attention from Indian publishers. Authors say Indian publishers are more open to experimentation with content, which makes getting published in India a lot easier. I found Indian editors much more understanding and supportive of the kind of narrative I wanted to write than those in the West. I think the fact that both Indians and Pakistanis live in nuanced societies struggling with modernity helps in debunking the exotic east or terrorist-Muslim kind of stereotypes that seem to form the expectations of Western publishers, says Sabyn Javeri. Javeris first book Nobody Killed Her was published in India by HarperCollins in March. Its a thriller based on the assassination of a political leader in Pakistan. She says Indian publishers stick to their commitment and seldom flip flop on a decision regarding a manuscript. Her book, she explains, was first acquired by a major international publisher but was later dropped. She said shes glad that editors in India did not stop backing it till it took its final shape a full-fledged book. Javeri says in a booming industry, Indian publishers are at a juncture where they can afford to experiment with content, genre and writers, even as book sales were on the decline in the rest of the world. Javeri is just one of the many authors from Pakistan whose manuscripts have found a home in India. Haroon Khalid, whose first book A White Trail: A Journey Into the Heart of Pakistans Religious Minorities (Westland) too first found acceptance in India, and he has published two more books in this country since. If I was publishing in Pakistan, there certainly would be some parts publishers would not publish. Publishers here (in Pakistan) can be a little more particular about what can be written and what not, says Khalid. They (the publishing houses in Pakistan) are choosy and tend to avoid controversial stuff. There are certain topics that writers and publishers now know they can never talk about, given the events in the past few years, Khalid says. His second book In Search of Shiva: A Study of Folk Religious Practices (Rupa) was released in 2015 and his latest book Walking with Nanak has again been published by Westland. The small number of publishers in Pakistan, Khalid notes, is also a strong reason behind Indian publishing houses attracting more and more Pakistani authors. Javeri says publishing houses in Pakistan often ask authors to sign a legal undertaking that there is nothing defamatory or blasphemous or anti-national before being allowed to publish. I think the whole idea of censoring is restrictive to art, Javeri maintains. But what is the real driving force behind this immense interest in authors from the subcontinent to Indian publishers? One possible reason is the similar culture and traditions make it easier for a Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Sri Lankan author to connect with his or her readers in India. Sri Lanka-based author Chhimi Tenduf-La explains, The reviews and feedback I have got from India suggest that there is not much difference between what an Indian and a Sri Lankan audience likes. The lives, culture, class divides and respect for elders are all similar. They have had no issue in connecting. Chhimis first book The Amazing Racist was published by Hachette India in 2015. His latest book Loyal Stalkers, published by Pan MacMillan, was released earlier this year. I felt that an Indian audience may understand my stories, set in Sri Lanka, without me having to hold their hands, Chhimi says. He says he didnt submit or contact any publisher based in Sri Lanka as he preferred to get rejected by publishers not from his country. There are other reasons for seeking publishing abroad. We dont offer advances to authors as we cant afford them. Our books are mostly found in local bookshops as well as in countries like Australia, Singapore and the UK, says Sam Perera, of a Sri-Lanka based publishing house Perera-Hussein. The Indian book market is also much larger than any of those in the neighbouring countries. A shared history often helps to attract the interest of readers. There is a similar cultural sensibility and a mutual understanding of the cultural subtext that runs through our two countries, Javeri says. Thats true for other countries in the region as well. Follow @htlifeandstyle for more

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June 21, 2017   Posted in: The Amazing Racist  Comments Closed

Writers from Pakistan, Sri Lanka find publishing haven in India – Daijiworld.com

By Somrita Ghosh New Delhi, Jun 20 (IANS): Indian publishing houses are fast becoming the preferred choice of writers from the neighbouring countries, with an increasing number of manuscripts from Pakistan and Sri Lanka doing well in India. Yet, it is a tale of many contrasts. Many of the manuscripts were originally rejected in their home countries while they attracted curious attention from Indian publishers. The editors at these publishing houses say that being more open to experimentation with content, the journey of authors from countries like Pakistan and Sri Lanka becomes much easier. “I found Indian editors much more understanding and supportive of the kind of narrative I wanted to write than those in the West. I think the fact that both Indians and Pakistanis live in nuanced societies struggling with modernity helps in debunking the exotic east or terrorist-Muslim kind of stereotypes that seem to form the expectations of Western publishers,” Sabyn Javeri told IANS in an email conversation from Pakistan. Javeri has just published her first book “Nobody Killed Her” in India by HarperCollins. It’s a thriller based on political assassination of a leader, underlying the violent history in the subcontinent. She says Indian publishers stick to their commitment and seldom flip flop on a decision regarding a manuscript. Her book, she claimed, was first acquired by a major international publisher but was later dropped. She expressed her happiness over the fact that “editors in India did not stop backing it” till it took its final shape — a full-fledged book. She said in a booming industry, Indian publishers are at a juncture where they can afford to experiment with content, genre and writers, even as book sales were on the decline in the rest of the world. Javeri’s book received critical acclaim in India. But she is just one of the many authors from Pakistan whose manuscripts have found a home in india. Haroon Khalid, whose first book “A White Trail: A Journey Into the Heart of Pakistan’s Religious Minorities” (Westland) too first found acceptance in India, has published two more books in this country. “If I was publishing in Pakistan, there certainly would be some parts publishers would not publish. Publishers here (in Pakistan) can be a little more particular about what can be written and what not,” said Khalid in email answers. “They (the publishing houses in Pakistan) are choosy and tend to avoid controversial stuff. There are certain topics that writers and publishers now know they can never talk about, given the events in the past few years,” Khalid responded to a question. His second book “In Search of Shiva: A Study of Folk Religious Practices” (Rupa) was released in 2015 and his latest book “Walking with Nanak” has again been published by Westland. The small number of publishers in Pakistan, Khalid noted, is a strong reason behind Indian publishing houses attracting more and more Pakistani authors. Javeri also said that the publishing houses in Pakistan often ask authors to sign a legal undertaking that there is nothing defamatory or blasphemous or anti-national before being allowed to publish. “I think the whole idea of censoring is restrictive to art,” Javeri maintained. But what is the real driving force behind this immense interest in authors from the subcontinent to Indian publishers? One possible reason is the similar culture and traditions make it easier for a Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Sri Lankan author to connect with his or her readers in India. “The reviews and feedback I have got from India suggest that there is not much difference between what an Indian and a Sri Lankan audience likes. The lives, culture, class divides and respect for elders are all similar. They have had no issue in connecting,” says Sri Lanka-based author Chhimi Tenduf-La. Chhimi’s first book “The Amazing Racist” was published by Hachette India in 2015. His latest book “Loyal Stalkers”, published by Pan MacMillan, was released this year. “I felt that an Indian audience may understand my stories, set in Sri Lanka, without me having to hold their hands,” Chhimi said. He said he didn’t submit or contact any publisher based in Sri Lanka as he “preferred to get rejected by publishers not from his country.” There are other reasons for seeking publishing abroad. “We don’t offer advances to authors as we can’t afford them. Our books are mostly found in local bookshops as well as in countries like Australia, Singapore and the UK,” said Sam Perera, Precedent Partner, of a Sri Lanka based publishing house ‘Perera-Hussein’. The Indian book market is also much larger than any of those in the neighbouring countries. A shared history often helps to attract the interest of readers. “There is a similar cultural sensibility and a mutual understanding of the cultural subtext that runs through our two countries,” Javeri said. That’s true for other countries in the region too.

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Ari Shaffir – Wikipedia

Ari Shaffir Shaffir performing in July 2016. Ari Shaffir (born February 12, 1974) is an American comedian, actor, podcaster, writer and producer. He is the producer and host of his podcast, Skeptic Tank, and the stand up comedy web and television series This Is Not Happening on Comedy Central. He also co-hosts the podcast Punch Drunk Sports with Jayson Thibault and Sam Tripoli, and is a regular guest on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Shaffir was born in New York City, and was raised as an Orthodox Jew.[1] His father and grandmother were Holocaust survivors.[2][3] Soon after his birth, his family moved to North Carolina, followed by Maryland.[4][5] He attended high school in Rockville, Maryland, followed by time at Yeshiva University in New York City,[6] where he accepted to study abroad in seminary in Israel for around three-and-a-half years. He added: “There was no test, there was nothing to memorize, so I just poured myself into it … one day I realized I didn’t really believe any of that stuff, so I stopped it.”[7] In 1999, Shaffir graduated from University of Maryland.[8] Following his graduation from university, Shaffir moved to Los Angeles to improve his chances of success as a stand up comedian.[8] He took up work answering the phones at The Comedy Store, which led to positions in the cover booth and “the door”, until owner Mitzi Shore made him a paid regular, four-and-a-half years later.[4] His early influences in comedy include watching showcase comedy shows on television as a youngster and comedians on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.[9] He cites Bill Burr as his favorite living comedian.[10] Shaffir’s first and only comedy performance on stage before he moved to Los Angeles took place in his early twenties at an open mic night at a “sports comedy place in Northern Virginia”.[4] Shaffir first became known for his viral video series The Amazing Racist[5] that fans uploaded onto YouTube that he originally shot for a DVD produced by National Lampoon, but was commercially unsuccessful.[7] In 2013, Shaffir created and produced This Is Not Happening, a stand up comedy web series featuring numerous comedians telling true life stories. The show was initially rejected for television broadcast as Shaffir was too unknown, but it was later picked up by Comedy Central which premiered in January 2015.[11] Later that year, Shaffir performed at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.[9] In 2009, Shaffir acquired a license to use marijuana in California.[4] In 2011, Shaffir began his podcast, Skeptic Tank.[12] In 2013, Shaffir began to cohost the sports podcast Punch Drunk Sports with fellow comedians Sam Tripoli and Jayson Thibault.[13] Shaffir appeared in the comedy feature film Keeping Up with the Joneses (2016).[14] January 4th 2017 Shaffir lost contact with his friends and social media to travel the world for four months. Being burnt out by his brief popularity, left Hollywood for New York.

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Clap Clap Boom – NY Blueprint

Comedian and actor Ari Shaffir,who was raised Orthodox and attended Yeshiva University, describes his comedy as a puppet show, but way filthier and without the puppets. He was a featured standup on the HBO comedy series Down and Dirty with Jim Norton and performed at the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal and Toronto, the San Francisco SketchFest, and the Bridgetown Comedy Festival in Portland. Shaffirs satirical shorts The Amazing Racist for National Lampoon went viral on the Internet with millions of views. Additionally, he has appeared on TBSs Conan, Comedy Centrals Jon Benjamin Has A Van, ESPN Classics Cheap Seats, and dozens of national commercials. Aris podcast is called The Skeptic Tank and he is a regular guest on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Derek Gaines started in the vicious comedy clubs of Philadelphia and then began to move around the tri-state area (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York), working and still working on what he would like to call the “Left field crusader show,”the style of comedy that speaks to all but touches the very hearts of the Black, “can’t-be-a-thug suburbanite only children” of the US.

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